Protected Objects Act 1975

Schedule 4
Categories of protected New Zealand objects

s 2(1)

  • Schedule 4: added, on 1 November 2006, by section 32 of the Protected Objects Amendment Act 2006 (2006 No 37).

1 Archaeological, ethnographic, and historical objects of non-New Zealand origin, relating to New Zealand
  • This category consists of archaeological and historical objects of non-New Zealand origin that—

    • (a) have been in New Zealand for not less than 50 years and are in or have been in a public collection; and

    • (b) are not represented by at least 2 comparable examples permanently held in New Zealand public collections; and

    • (c) include any object of Polynesian creation or modification brought to New Zealand before 1800 or created or modified by the former Polynesian inhabitants of the Kermadec Islands before 1800.

2 Art objects including fine, decorative, and popular art
  • (1) This category includes the following objects and their supporting documentation and preparatory material:

    • (a) architectural material, including whole or parts of architectural structures, fixtures, fittings, and decoration and interior decoration:

    • (b) arms and armour:

    • (c) art works in fibre or fabric or both:

    • (d) artists’ prints, posters, illustrated books, and similar art works with potential for multiple production:

    • (e) book art:

    • (f) ceramics and glass:

    • (g) costumes and textiles:

    • (h) furniture:

    • (i) horological instruments:

    • (j) jewellery and body adornment:

    • (k) metalwork:

    • (l) musical instruments:

    • (m) paintings:

    • (n) photographs, moving image art works, sound art works and film, and similar art works with potential for multiple production:

    • (o) sculpture, carving, and other 3-dimensional art works that are either unique or have potential for multiple production:

    • (p) unique art works on paper, including watercolours, drawings, and sketches:

    • (q) woodwork:

    • (r) other art works, including (but not limited to) scrimshaw, plastics, paper, stone, shell, kauri gum, and bone.

    (2) An object is included in this category if it is—

    • (a) not represented by at least 2 comparable examples permanently held in New Zealand public collections; and

    • (b) made by—

      • (i) an artist or maker born in or related to New Zealand and who is no longer living; or

      • (ii) a living artist or maker born in or related to New Zealand where that artist or maker is not the owner; and

    • (c) not less than 50 years old.

3 Documentary heritage objects
  • (1) In this category, unless the context otherwise requires,—

    collection means forming a collection assembled by a person, objects that originate from a common source, or objects devoted to a single theme, person, place, event, or thing

    record means recorded information, in any format, created or received by a person or an organisation in the course of business undertaken by that person or organisation and stored in any format.

    (2) Objects in this category include (but are not limited to)—

    • (a) books:

    • (b) maps and other cartographic records:

    • (c) photographs and negatives:

    • (d) ephemera:

    • (e) music scores:

    • (f) film:

    • (g) sound recordings:

    • (h) cinematographic, video production, or any other production comprising moving images or recorded sound:

    • (i) digitally born objects, supporting material, and applications and technical infrastructure important for their understanding.

    (3) An object is included in this category if it—

    • (a) is not represented by at least 2 comparable examples permanently held in New Zealand public collections; and

    • (b) is—

      • (i) not less than 50 years old; or

      • (ii) any unique document or collection of unique documents not less than 50 years old; or

    (4) This category does not include any document owned by its living creator who was born in or is related to New Zealand.

4 Ngā taonga tūturu
  • This category includes any taonga tūturu.

5 Natural science objects
  • (1) In this category, unless the context otherwise requires,—

    description means the scientific description of a taxon in the manner prescribed by the international codes of zoological, mineralogical, and botanical nomenclature

    fossil, irrespective of how it is preserved, means an object constituting the remains or traces of a non-human organism that lived in New Zealand prior to human habitation; including (but not limited to) the whole organism or parts of it, or trace evidence of its behaviour

    meteorite means a natural object of extraterrestrial origin

    mineral means an element or chemical compound that occurs naturally in rocks, soil, or water; and—

    • (a) includes—

      • (i) crystals and naturally occurring metals; and

      • (ii) gemstones, whether or not polished or faceted by humans; but

    • (b) does not include—

      • (i) minerals, ores, and concentrates intended for industrial use; or

      • (ii) any work made by humans from minerals

    taxon means a taxonomic grouping of extant or extinct organisms, such as a genus, species, or sub-species

    tektite means a small glassy natural object of non-volcanic origin

    ventifact means a stone or pebble, shaped, worn, faceted, cut, or polished by the abrasive action of windblown dust or sand.

    (2) This category consists of extant or extinct native organisms, products of animal and plant behaviour (such as nests, coprolites, and kauri gum), fossils, fluids, rocks, and minerals (including, but not limited to, ventifacts, obsidians, pumices, meteorites, and tektites) of New Zealand origin or related to New Zealand.

    (3) Objects in this category include—

    • (a) a category of type specimen as defined by the current edition of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, or the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria: Bacteriological Code:

    • (b) a specimen considered to be scientifically important for defining a taxon through having been illustrated in the original description, or new material subsequently illustrated (that is, hypotypes) and used to expand or refine this description in the scientific literature:

    • (c) a specimen of an extant or extinct plant or rock or mineral, animal, or other organism or fossil or part thereof including any developmental stage, shell, or skeletal or supporting element, of which there is not a sufficient selection in New Zealand public collections to define the variation, range, and environmental context of the taxon or object.

    (4) Duplicates of a category of type specimen as defined by the current edition of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, or the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria: Bacteriological Code may be excluded from this category if there is sufficient original type material held in New Zealand public collections to define the taxon.

6 New Zealand archaeological objects
  • This category consists of any objects, assemblages, scientific samples, and organic remains derived from a New Zealand archaeological site, as defined by the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014.

    Schedule 4 clause 6: amended, on 20 May 2014, by section 107 of the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 (2014 No 26).

7 Numismatic and philatelic objects
  • (1) The philatelic category consists of any items of the New Zealand Post Museum Collection.

    (2) The numismatics category consists of the following objects:

    • (a) examples of the Resolution and Adventure Medal, 1772:

    • (b) the Pattern Waitangi Crown:

    • (c) issued £50 and £100 New Zealand banknotes produced before 1933:

    • (d) examples of the New Zealand Cross, Victoria Cross, and George Cross, and their associated groups, awarded to a New Zealander or related to New Zealand:

    • (e) any related original art work and design of New Zealand coins and banknotes.

    (3) The numismatic and philatelic categories include (but are not limited to) dies and printing plates associated with the manufacture of New Zealand coins, banknotes, postage, and revenue stamps.

8 Science, technology, industry, economy, and transport objects
  • (1) Objects in this category include (but are not limited to) any—

    • (a) vessel:

    • (b) machine:

    • (c) vehicle:

    • (d) aircraft:

    • (e) equipment:

    • (f) machinery:

    • (g) tool:

    • (h) patent model:

    • (i) model:

    • (j) accessory:

    • (k) part:

    • (l) component:

    • (m) prototype:

    • (n) object:

    • (o) device, apparatus, instrument, implement, or structure:

    • (p) dies and plates:

    • (q) documentation:

    • (r) ephemera.

    (2) Objects in this category are related to—

    • (a) air, land, and water transport:

    • (b) communication, printing, and information technology:

    • (c) design:

    • (d) energy production and distribution:

    • (e) engineering:

    • (f) extractive industries:

    • (g) human and animal health:

    • (h) hydrology:

    • (i) manufacturing:

    • (j) primary production and processing:

    • (k) research, invention, and applied technology:

    • (l) the service and recreation industries:

    • (m) surveying.

    (3) An object is included in this category if it is—

    • (a) not represented by at least 2 comparable examples permanently held in New Zealand public collections; and

    • (b) not less than 50 years old.

9 Social history objects
  • (1) This category includes (but is not limited to) objects relating to—

    • (a) community organisations and activities:

    • (b) courts, tribunals, and law enforcement, including (but not limited to) the Police, law-breakers, and prison life:

    • (c) cultural life and arts and crafts:

    • (d) domestic life, including buildings, fixtures and decorations, equipment and furniture, costumes and textiles, and personal effects:

    • (e) education:

    • (f) exploration, voyaging, migration, and settlement:

    • (g) health, medicine, and welfare:

    • (h) international relations:

    • (i) leisure and recreation, including all forms of sport, entertainment, and tourism:

    • (j) New Zealand military history:

    • (k) personal histories:

    • (l) religion and missions:

    • (m) social and political issues:

    • (n) transport and communications:

    • (o) urban and rural culture:

    • (p) work life, including specialised trades and labour material, trade unionism, company activity and corporate identity, trade and commerce, and agriculture and industry:

    • (q) any other objects in these categories.

    (2) In this category, unless the context otherwise requires, New Zealand military history means the history of—

    • (a) wars and conflicts involving New Zealand or New Zealanders or New Zealand residents, including (but not limited to) military and non-military activities and experiences:

    • (b) the New Zealand Defence Force and its antecedent components:

    • (c) operations and activities involving New Zealand Defence Forces:

    • (d) New Zealand allies within New Zealand or associated with New Zealand Defence Forces:

    • (e) forces opposing the New Zealand Defence Forces whether in New Zealand or overseas:

    • (f) regular or irregular sea, land, and air force units in which New Zealanders have taken part.

    (3) This category includes New Zealand manufactured or designed military objects and their associated documentation.

    (4) An object is included in this category if it is—

    • (a) not represented by at least 2 comparable examples permanently held in New Zealand public collections; and

    • (b) not less than 50 years old.