Part 4 Good reasons for refusing access to personal information

27 Security, defence, international relations, etc

(1)

An agency may refuse to disclose any information requested pursuant to principle 6 if the disclosure of the information would be likely—

(a)

to prejudice the security or defence of New Zealand or the international relations of the Government of New Zealand; or

(b)

to prejudice the entrusting of information to the Government of New Zealand on a basis of confidence by—

(i)

the Government of any other country or any agency of such a Government; or

(ii)

any international organisation; or

(c)

to prejudice the maintenance of the law, including the prevention, investigation, and detection of offences, and the right to a fair trial; or

(d)

to endanger the safety of any individual.

(2)

An agency may refuse to disclose any information requested pursuant to principle 6 if the disclosure of the information would be likely—

(a)

to prejudice the security or defence of—

(i)

the self-governing State of the Cook Islands; or

(ii)

the self-governing State of Niue; or

(iii)

Tokelau; or

(iv)

the Ross Dependency; or

(b)

to prejudice relations between any of the Governments of—

(i)

New Zealand:

(ii)

the self-governing State of the Cook Islands:

(iii)

the self-governing State of Niue; or

(c)

to prejudice the international relations of the Governments of—

(i)

the self-governing State of the Cook Islands; or

(ii)

the self-governing State of Niue.

Compare: 1982 No 156 s 27(1)(a); 1987 No 8 s 4(2); 1987 No 174 s 26(1)(a)