New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000

3 Purpose

(1)

The purpose of this Act is to provide for the public funding and provision of personal health services, public health services, and disability support services, and to establish new publicly-owned health and disability organisations, in order to pursue the following objectives:

(a)

to achieve for New Zealanders—

(i)

the improvement, promotion, and protection of their health:

(ii)

the promotion of the inclusion and participation in society and independence of people with disabilities:

(iii)

the best care or support for those in need of services:

(b)

to reduce health disparities by improving the health outcomes of Maori and other population groups:

(c)

to provide a community voice in matters relating to personal health services, public health services, and disability support services—

(i)

by providing for elected board members of DHBs:

(ii)

by providing for board meetings and certain committee meetings to be open to the public:

(iii)

by providing for consultation on strategic planning:

(d)

to facilitate access to, and the dissemination of information to deliver, appropriate, effective, and timely health services, public health services and programmes, both for the protection and the promotion of public health, and disability support services.

(2)

The objectives stated in subsection (1) are to be pursued to the extent that they are reasonably achievable within the funding provided.

(3)

To avoid any doubt, nothing in this Act—

(a)

entitles a person to preferential access to services on the basis of race; or

(b)

limits section 73 of the Human Rights Act 1993 (which relates to measures to ensure equality).

(4)

In giving effect to the purposes set out in subsection (1), the Crown and DHBs must endeavour to promote the integration of all health services, especially primary and secondary services.

(5)

In giving effect to the purposes set out in subsection (1), the Crown and DHBs must endeavour to provide for health services to be organised at either a local, regional, or national level depending on the optimum arrangement for the most effective delivery of properly co-ordinated health services.