Search and Surveillance Powers Bill

  • discharged on 02 July 2009

Search and Surveillance Powers Bill

Government Bill

300—1

Explanatory note

General policy statement

The Search and Surveillance Powers Bill implements the Government’s decisions on the legislative reform of search and surveillance powers. These decisions were largely based on the Law Commission’s report, Search and Surveillance Powers (NZLC 97).

Core police search powers are contained in statutes that are up to 50 years old. The law has thus become outdated and has been supplemented by case law to fill gaps in the legislation. Search powers have been granted to non-police law enforcement agencies and have developed in a piecemeal manner scattered throughout various pieces of legislation, often in an incoherent or inconsistent manner. In particular—

  • there are inconsistencies in the way search powers are framed and how they may be exercised; and

  • legislation does not always meet law enforcement needs or adequately provide protections to those who may be subject to search; and

  • there is uncertainty as to the nature or extent of some existing search powers and procedures.

The Bill will reform the law to provide a coherent, consistent and certain approach in balancing the complementary values of law enforcement and human rights.

The law has also failed to keep pace with technology. Criminals have increasingly been able to use computers and other electronic devices to commit or facilitate illegal activity. The Bill provides for the appropriate legislative powers to enable law enforcement agencies to extract electronic information and use surveillance devices in order to investigate and combat criminal activity.

In addition the Law Commission’s report noted that judicial dissatisfaction has been expressed with aspects of the status quo, particularly the quality of applications for search warrants. The Bill addresses that concern by, amongst other things, providing for the training of issuing officers who issue search warrants, prescribing forms for warrant applications, and imposing reporting requirements.

Overall, the Bill will provide a much needed reform of the law on search and surveillance in New Zealand.

Clause by clause analysis

Clause 1 is the Title clause.

Clause 2 is the commencement clause and provides that the Bill comes into force on 1 July 2010.

Part 1
General provisions

Clause 3 is the interpretation clause.

Clause 4 states that the Act binds the Crown.

Part 2
Police powers

Subpart 1Rules about internal searches and search warrant powers in relation to places, vehicles, and other things

Clause 5 states a general prohibition on internal searches of people's bodies, with exceptions related to searching the mouth of a person who consents to that search, and to some Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 offences. Clause 5 corresponds to the current section 18A(1) and (5) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975.

Clause 6 sets out the grounds on which an issuing officer may issue a search warrant, on application by a member of the police, in relation to a place, vehicle, or other thing.

Subpart 2Warrantless powers to enter, search, and seize when effecting arrest

Clause 7 authorises a member of the police to enter a place or vehicle without a warrant in some circumstances in which a person is unlawfully at large (as defined in clause 3).

Clause 8 authorises a member of the police, in certain circumstances set out in clause 8, to enter a place or vehicle without a warrant and to arrest a person suspected of having committed an offence punishable by imprisonment.

Stopping vehicle without warrant to effect arrest

Clause 9 sets out the circumstances in which a member of the police may stop a vehicle to arrest a person.

Clause 10 specifies the powers and duties of a member of the police when exercising the stopping power under clause 10.

Subpart 3Warrantless searches of people locked up in police custody

Clause 11 sets out the rules for searching people locked up in police custody.

Clause 12 provides for searchers to be employed to conduct searches under clause 11.

Clause 13 provides for the return of property taken by a search under clause 11.

Subpart 4Warrantless powers of entry in urgent circumstances

Clause 14 allows a member of the police to enter a place or vehicle without a warrant in some situations of urgency and to take preventative action.

Subpart 5Warrantless powers in relation to evidence of serious offending

Clause 15 authorises a member of the police to enter a place or vehicle in circumstances, set out in clause 15, that require the securing of evidential material relating to serious offences.

Clause 16 authorises a member of the police to search a person in a public place in relation to evidence of serious offences.

Clause 17 provides a power similar to that of clause 16 in relation to searching vehicles in public places.

Subpart 6Warrantless powers in relation to arms offences

Clause 18 provides for warrantless searches associated with arms (as defined in clause 3).

Subpart 7Police powers in relation to Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 offences

Clauses 19 to 23 relate to searches in the context of offences against the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975.

Clause 19 permits warrantless searches of places and vehicles in specified circumstances relating to controlled drugs, precursor substances, and Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 offences.

Clause 20 allows a member of the police to search a person found in or on a place or vehicle that is being searched under clause 19.

Clause 21 allows a member of the police to search a person and seize controlled drugs and precursor substances found during the search, in specified circumstances relating to controlled drugs, precursor substances, and Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 offences.

Clause 22 sets out the requirements for internal searches of a person's body by a medical practitioner in specific situations relating to Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 offences.

Clause 23 describes the possible effects on bail applications by a person who refuses to undergo a search under clause 25.

Subpart 8Warrantless powers in relation to offences against section 202A of Crimes Act 1961

Clause 24 provides the meanings of disabling substance and offensive weapon for the purposes of subpart 8.

Clause 25 authorises a member of the police to stop and search a person in specified circumstances relating to knives, offensive weapons, and disabling substances, and to seize the knives, weapons, and substances.

Clause 26 authorises a member of the police to stop, search, and detain a vehicle in specified circumstances relating to knives, offensive weapons, and disabling substances, and to seize the knives, weapons, and substances.

Subpart 9Warrantless search of vehicle for stolen property

Clause 27 authorises searching a vehicle for stolen property.

Subpart 10Other powers related to search of vehicles

Stopping vehicles with or without warrant for purposes of search

Clause 28 sets out the meaning of a statutory search power for the purposes of clause 28. Clause 28 also sets out how and in what circumstances a member of the police may exercise a statutory search power to stop a vehicle to search it.

Warrantless powers relating to road blocks and road closures

Clause 29 sets out how and in what circumstances a senior member of the police (as defined in clause 3) may authorise a road block in order to arrest a person.

Clause 30 specifies the duration of an authorisation under clause 29, and requires written records of the road block to be kept.

Clause 31 sets out what any member of the police may do when a road block is authorised under clause 29.

Clause 32 authorises a senior member of the police (as defined in clause 3) to close a road temporarily in certain circumstances.

Subpart 11Examination orders

Examination orders in business contexts

Clause 33 provides that the Commissioner may apply to a Judge for an examination order in a business context, and sets out the application's requirements.

Clause 34 sets out the conditions for making an examination order in a business context against a person.

Examination orders in contexts other than those of business

Clause 35 provides that the Commissioner or his or her delegate may apply to a Judge for an examination order in a non-business context, and sets out the application's requirements.

Clause 36 sets out the conditions of making an examination order in a non-business context.

Other provisions that apply to examination order applications

Clause 37 sets out other provisions relating to search warrant applications that apply, with modifications, to applications for examination orders.

Making examination orders and contents of examination orders

Clause 38 permits a Judge to make an examination order against a person in a business or non-business context, and specifies the matters on which the Judge must be satisfied before making the order.

Clause 39 specifies the form and content of an examination order.

Other provisions relating to examination orders

Clause 40 requires that a person against whom an examination order is made must be given a reasonable opportunity to be accompanied by a lawyer when appearing before the Commissioner or his or her delegate.

Clause 41 provides that an examination order remains in force for a period specified in the order, but of no more than 30 days after the date on which the order is made.

Clause 42 sets out other provisions relating to search warrants that apply, with modifications, to examination orders.

Subpart 12Other matters

Clause 43 preserves the common law defence of necessity as it applies to people other than members of the police.

Part 3
Enforcement officers' powers and orders

Subpart 1Surveillance device warrants and residual warrants

Clause 44 sets out various circumstances in which an enforcement officer (as defined in clause 3) does not require a warrant to undertake certain activities.

Clause 45 sets out further situations of urgency or emergency, when the duration of the surveillance is to be no longer than 72 hours, in which a surveillance device warrant is not needed.

Clause 46 sets out situations in which an enforcement officer must obtain a surveillance device warrant.

Application for surveillance device warrant

Clause 47 states the particulars that an application for a surveillance device warrant must contain.

Clause 48 specifies the conditions for issuing a surveillance device warrant.

Clause 49 lists provisions (relating to verification and mode of application, and to retention of documents) that apply to search warrants that also apply, with some modifications, to applications for surveillance device warrants.

Issuing of surveillance device warrant

Clause 50 stipulates who may issue a surveillance device warrant, and in what conditions he or she may issue it.

Clause 51 restricts the issue of surveillance device warrants that would impinge on certain lawyer-client communications to which legal professional privilege normally applies.

Clause 52 specifies the form and contents of a surveillance device warrant.

Carrying out activities authorised by surveillance device warrants

Clause 53 specifies who may carry out the activities authorised by a surveillance device warrant.

Other provisions applying to surveillance device warrants

Clause 54 lists provisions (relating to transmission of warrants and when they are invalid) that apply to search warrants that also apply, with some modifications, to surveillance device warrants.

Surveillance device warrant reports

Clause 55 sets out reporting requirements in relation to surveillance device warrants by those who carry out activities authorised by the warrants.

Clause 56 sets out reporting requirements in relation to the use of surveillance devices under clause 45 in situations of urgency or emergency.

Clause 57 details the possible actions a Judge may take on receipt of a report under clause 55.

Clause 58 details the possible actions a Judge may take on receipt of a report under clause 56.

Residual warrants

Clause 59 sets out the circumstances in which a law enforcement agency must obtain a residual warrant.

Application for residual warrant

Clause 60 states the particulars that an application for a residual warrant must contain.

Clause 61 specifies the conditions for issuing a residual warrant.

Clause 62 lists provisions (relating to verification and mode of application, and to retention of documents) that apply to search warrants that also apply, with some modifications, to applications for residual warrants.

Issuing of residual warrants

Clause 63 stipulates who may issue a residual warrant, and in what conditions he or she may issue it.

Clause 64 restricts the issue of residual warrants that would impinge on certain lawyer-client communications to which legal professional privilege normally applies.

Clause 65 specifies the form and content of a residual warrant.

Carrying out activities authorised by residual warrants

Clause 66 specifies who may carry out the activities authorised by a residual warrant.

Other provisions that apply to residual warrants

Clause 67 lists provisions (relating to transmission of warrants and when they are invalid) that apply to search warrants that also apply, with some modifications, to residual warrants.

Residual warrant reports

Clause 68 sets out reporting requirements in relation to residual warrants by those who carry out activities authorised by the warrants.

Clause 69 details the possible actions a Judge may take on receipt of a report under clause 68.

Subpart 2Production and monitoring orders

Clause 70 is the interpretation provision for subpart 2 of Part 3.

Clause 71 provides that an enforcement officer who may apply for a search warrant to obtain documents may apply to an issuing officer (as defined in clause 3) for a production order and sets out the application's requirements.

Clause 72 sets out the conditions for making a production order.

Clause 73 list provisions (relating to verification and mode of application, and to retention of documents) that apply to search warrants that also apply, with some modifications, to a production order.

Clause 74 sets out the conditions under which an issuing officer may make a production order.

Clause 75 specifies the form and content of a production order.

Clause 76 provides that a production order remain in force for a period specified in the order, but of no more than 30 days after the date on which the order is made.

Clause 77 lists some provisions that apply to search warrants that also apply, with some modification, to production orders.

Clause 78 enables the enforcement officer who applied for the production order to do various things in relation to a document produced in compliance with a production order.

Subpart 3Police and customs officer powers in relation to delivery under section 12 of Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978

Clause 79 provides that Part 4 provisions apply to searches conducted under subpart 3 of Part 3.

Clause 80 relates the meanings of terms used in the subpart to their meanings in the Customs and Excise Act 1996.

Clause 81 sets out circumstances, relating to deliveries under section 12 of the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978, and to offences under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975, when a member of the police or customs officer may search a person, detain him or her, enter and search places, craft, and vehicles, and seize things.

Subpart 4Warrantless powers of entry and search incidental to arrest or detention

Clause 82 applies subpart 4 to any person who has a statutory power of arrest or detention.

Clause 83 authorises a person to whom subpart 4 applies to enter a place and search it, in specified circumstances, on arrest by that person of another person.

Clause 84 enables a person to whom subpart 4 applies who has arrested a person to search a vehicle for evidential material in relation to the offence for which that person was arrested.

Clauses 85 to 87 authorise a person to whom subpart 4 applies to carry out, in certain circumstances, a rub-down search of a person who is arrested or detained pursuant to a statutory power of detention, and specify the parameters of a rub-down search.

Clause 88 authorises the search of a person by a person to whom subpart 4 applies, in specified circumstances.

Part 4
General provisions in relation to search and inspection powers

Subpart 1Application of rules and consent searches

Clause 89 enables a duty imposed on an enforcement officer by Part 4 to be carried out by another enforcement officer employed by or engaged by the law enforcement agency. This is to ensure flexibility in the conduct of searching that involves considerable material or extends over a lengthy period. Clause 89 also provides for the transfer of obligations under this Part where a thing that is seized or produced is transferred from one law enforcement agency to another, for the purposes of investigation or prosecution.

Clause 90 sets out rules of application concerning clauses 91 to 94 (which relates to consent searches).

Clause 91 sets out the purposes for which a consent search may be undertaken.

Clause 92 requires an enforcement officer to determine that a consent search is for a purpose authorised by clause 91 before undertaking a consent search. Clause 91 also requires an enforcement officer to advise a person from whom consent is sought of the reason for the proposed search, and that the person may either consent or refuse to consent to the search.

Clause 93 provides that non-compliance with the requirements of clauses 91 and 92 makes the search unlawful.

Clause 94 provides that, with one exception, a person under 14 years of age is unable to consent to the search of a place, vehicle, or other thing.

Clause 95 provides that clauses 91 to 94 do not—

  • apply to a search conducted as a condition of entry to any public or private place; or

  • apply to a search conducted in accordance with a power conferred by an enactment; or

  • affect the rule of law relating to the implied licence to enter property.

Subpart 2Search warrants

Clause 96 is an application clause which explains when clauses 97 to 101 apply.

Clause 97 defines the term applicant for the purposes of this subpart.

Clause 98 describes the particulars that must be included in an application for a search warrant. Clause 98(2) enables an issuing officer (a person entitled to issue a search warrant) to require an applicant to supply further information concerning the grounds on which the search warrant is sought, but limits the nature of information that may be sought about an informant. Clause 98 also requires applicants to disclose information about certain previous applications for a search warrant in relation to the place, vehicle, or other thing proposed to be searched, and to make reasonable inquiries for that purpose.

Clause 99 requires an application for a search warrant to contain or be accompanied by a statement by the applicant confirming the truth and accuracy of the contents of the application.

Clause 100 sets out rules governing the mode of application for a search warrant. In general an applicant must make a written application and appear in person before, or communicate orally with, an issuing officer. In certain circumstances an issuing officer may allow an application for a search warrant to be made without the need for an application in writing. An issuing officer may dispense with the need for either a personal appearance or an oral communication in some circumstances. If the issuing officer dispenses with the need for a written application, or the need for either a personal appearance by the applicant or any oral communication, the issuing officer must record the grounds for the application as soon as practicable.

Clause 101 requires documents relating to search warrant applications and related documents to be kept until the completion of any proceedings in respect of which the validity of the warrant may be in issue and in any other case for a period of 2 years.

Issuing of search warrant

Clause 102 substantially limits the ability to issue a warrant to seize any thing held by a lawyer and also corresponds to some of the criteria in section 67(1) of the Evidence Act 2008.

Clause 103 sets out rules about the form of search warrants, to whom they may be directed and executed, the conditions that may be imposed by an issuing officer, and the particulars that must be included in the warrant.

Clause 104 enables an issuing officer to require the provision of a search warrant report to the issuing officer within a specified period. A search warrant report must indicate whether the warrant was executed, whether the execution resulted in the seizure of evidential material, and if so, certain details about that material, together with information about the exercise of other powers in conjunction with the execution of the warrant and information about resulting criminal proceedings.

Clause 105 facilitates the use of facsimile or electronic copies of search warrants and enables the use of a copy made at the direction of the issuing officer.

Clause 106 defines when execution of a warrant is taken to have occurred.

Clause 107 specifies when a search warrant is invalid.

Clause 108 relates to the appointment of an issuing officer. A Judge is an issuing officer. Any Justice of the Peace, Community Magistrate, Registrar, Deputy Registrar, or other person may also be appointed as an issuing officer, for a term not exceeding 3 years. Such a person may not be appointed as an issuing officer unless he or she has sufficient knowledge, skill, and experience to act as an issuing officer.

Subpart 3Carrying out inspection and search powers

Clause 109 defines the term search power for the purposes of subpart 3. In general terms those provisions will apply in respect of every search warrant issued under the Bill (once enacted) or any provision listed in the Schedule and every power conferred by the Bill (once enacted) or any provision listed in the Schedule to enter and search (without warrant) any place, vehicle, or other thing.

Clause 110 specifies the things that may be done by a person exercising a search power.

Clause 111 enables a person exercising a search power to seize an item of uncertain status and remove it to another location to determine whether it may lawfully be seized.

Clause 112 sets out the powers of persons called on to assist a person exercising a search power and sets out duties of persons in relation to control of any person being used as an assistant.

Giving directions

Clause 113 provides that the powers conferred by clauses 110 to 112 are subject to—

  • conditions imposed by an issuing officer who issues a search warrant; and

  • subpart 4 of this Part (which relates to privilege and confidentiality).

Clause 114 enables a person carrying out a search to secure the place, vehicle, or other thing being searched, and in certain circumstances, exclude other persons from the scene of the search or give them reasonable directions.

Establishing search scene

Clause 115 enables the exercise of special powers (in particular the entry and securing of a place, vehicle, or other thing and any related items) while an application for a search warrant is pending.

Detention of person at search scene

Clause 116 sets out powers of detention that may be exercised when a person exercises a power to search a place or vehicle.

Powers of search incidental to power of arrest

Clause 117 describes powers to search the person that may be exercised while a person with a power to arrest is searching a place or vehicle.

Clause 118 describes powers to search a suspect when that suspect is pursued by a person with a power of arrest who was, or was intending to, conduct a search of a person or vehicle.

Moving vehicle for safekeeping and other purposes

Clause 119 confers powers on law enforcement officers to move a vehicle to another place for the purposes of search, safekeeping, or road safety.

Seizure of items in plain view

Clause 120 enables the seizure of evidential material in plain view.

Search of persons

Clause 121 sets out special rules governing the search of a person, including identification, the advice to be given, the period of any detention, and the use of force and equipment in conducting the search.

Clause 122 requires law enforcment agencies that employ persons with the power of search to issue guidelines to those persons about the use of strip searching.

Search warrants to enter and search vehicles

Clause 123 enables a person executing a search warrant authorising the entry and search of a vehicle to enter any place where the person has reasonable grounds to believe the vehicle is.

Provision of particulars and other information

Clause 124 confers power on a person exercising a power to stop or search a vehicle, to require the person in the vehicle to supply particulars, and to require the vehicle to remain stopped for as long as is reasonably necessary to undertake the search.

Clause 125 requires a person who stops a vehicle to identify himself or herself to the driver, inform the driver of his or her authority to stop the vehicle, and if not in uniform produce evidence of his or her identity on request.

Computer searches

Clause 126 sets out the circumstances in which persons with knowledge of a computer, computer network, or other data storage devices may be required to assist persons exercising a search power.

Identification and notice

Clause 127 sets out identification and notice requirements for a person exercising a search power.

Clause 128 requires the provision of an inventory of items seized, and a copy of the authority for the search and seizure, to the occupier of the place, or the person in charge of the vehicle or other place, from where the seizure took place.

Clause 129 enables compliance with certain requirements in clauses 127 and 128 to be deferred on the order of a District Court Judge.

Clause 130 enables the further postponement of, or dispensation from, the obligation to comply with those provisions

Subpart 4Privilege and confidentiality

General

Clause 131 recognises, for the purposes of this subpart, privileges described or acknowledged under sections 53(5), 54, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 64, and 68 of the Evidence Act 2006. There is an exception for communications made or information received or compiled or prepared for a dishonest purpose or to enable the planning of offences corresponding to some criteria in section 67(1) of that Act.

Clause 132 enables the search of lawyers trust account records.

Examination orders and production orders

Clauses 133 and 134 set out specific rules relating to the privilege against self-incrimination, and other privileges recognised by this subpart respectively, when an examination order or production order is issued.

Surveillance

Clause 135 sets out specific rules dealing with the effect of a privilege recognised by this subpart on surveillance conducted under this Bill (once enacted).

Search warrants and other search powers

Clauses 136 to 141 set out specific rules relating to privileges recognised by this subpart, when a search warrant is to be executed or other search power is to be exercised. Clause 140 sets out interim steps that may be taken by a person executing a search warrant or exercising a search power pending the resolution of a privilege claim. Clause 141 imposes certain obligations on a person who wishes to claim privilege for things sought to be seized.

Admission of evidence generally

Clause 142 provides that if a claim of privilege is upheld in respect of any communication or information, it is not admissible in any proceedings arising from, or related to, the exercise of the relevant power.

Subpart 5Procedures applying to seized or produced materials

Clause 143 provides for things produced under a production order or seized under a search warrant or a search power conferred by this Bill (once enacted) or a provision listed in the Schedule to be dealt with in accordance with this subpart.

Clause 144 requires things seized or produced, if not required for investigative or evidential purposes, to be returned to their owner or to the person entitled to possession, or to be the subject of a determination as to ownership by the District Court, or to be disposed of (because their possession is unlawful), or to be destroyed (if they have become rotten or have otherwise deteriorated).

Clause 145 provides for the custody of things seized or produced, that are required for investigative or evidential purposes, and sets out rules governing the length of time for which they may be held.

Clause 146 provides that if a photograph or copy of a seized or produced thing will be adequate for investigative or evidential purposes, the thing may be returned to the owner or to a person entitled to possession.

Clause 147 enables the District Court to grant an extension of time for holding a thing seized or produced.

Clause 148 enables the District Court to make orders about the ownership or holding of any thing seized or produced.

Clause 149 provides that if the ownership or person entitled to possession of a thing served or produced is not established within 2 years after the date on which the thing was seized or produced, the property is forfeited to the Crown.

Rights of owners or others in relation to things seized or produced

Clause 150 sets out a procedure for persons with an interest in a thing seized or produced to apply to have the thing released to them or to be given access to it.

Clause 151 provides that a failure to comply with any bond, surety, or condition imposed under clause 150 may result in the thing again being seized or access to it denied.

Clauses 152 and 153 provides for persons to apply to the District Court for access to a thing seized or produced, or release of the thing seized or produced.

Clause 154 sets out a procedure for the disposal of things, the possession of which is unlawful under New Zealand law.

Clause 155 sets out requirements relating to the disposal of forensic copies of evidential material.

Clause 156 enables other copies of things made and generated material to be retained.

Subpart 6Immunities

Clause 157 provides that an issuing officer who is not a Judge has the same immunities as a District Court Judge.

Clause 158 sets out the immunities that apply in relation to obtaining or executing orders or warrants under the Bill (once enacted).

Clause 159 sets out other immunities in relation to the exercise of entry, search, or surveillance powers.

Clause 160 provides that if any person is immune from civil liability under any of clauses 157 to 159 the Crown is also immune from civil liability in respect of that conduct.

Clause 161 deals with the interrelationship between clauses 157 to 160 and other enactments that confer, regulate, or limit a privilege or immunity

Subpart 7Reporting

Clause 162 sets out internal reporting requirements relating to the exercise of warrantless entry powers, search powers, or surveillance powers conferred by the Bill (once enacted) or by any other enactment listed in the Schedule.

Clause 163 sets out annual reporting requirements to Parliament by chief executives of law enforcement agencies on the exercise of warrantless entry powers, search powers, or surveillance powers during the period covered by the report. Clauses 163 and 164 also require certain information to be provided about surveillance device warrants and residual warrants.

Subpart 8Offences

Clause 165 creates an offence of failing without reasonable excuse to comply with an examination order.

Clause 166 creates an offence of failing without reasonable excuse to comply with a production order.

Clause 167 creates an offence of making a false application for an examination order, a production order, a search warrant, a surveillance device warrant, or a residual warrant.

Clause 168 makes it an offence for a person to fail to comply with a direction under clause 115(1), or leave any place or vehicle at which he or she is detained in breach of clause 116(1).

Clause 169 makes it an offence to fail to—

  • stop a vehicle when required to do so by a person who is exercising a power to stop a vehicle:

  • comply with a requirement made by that person under clause 124 or any other applicable search power.

Clause 170 makes it an offence for a person to fail to carry out his or her obligations under clause 126 (which imposes a duty on certain persons to assist with computer searches).

Clause 171 makes it an offence to disclose information acquired through surveillance (otherwise than on the performance of a person's duties).

Subpart 9Miscellaneous

Clause 172 relates to the effect of proceedings on the exercise of powers and discharge of duties under the Bill (once enacted).

Clause 173 sets out rules about the service of orders and notices.

Part 5
Amendments, repeals, and miscellaneous provisions

Subpart 1Amendments to search and seizure powers in other enactments (and to related provisions) used for law enforcement purposes

Clauses 174 to 228 amend search and seizure powers that are used for law enforcement purposes in other Acts, so that some or all of the provisions of Part 4 apply to those powers. The following Acts are amended:

  • Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997:

  • Animal Products Act 1991:

  • Antarctic Marine Living Resources Act 1981:

  • Antarctica (Environmental Protection) Act 1994:

  • Aviation Crimes Act 1972:

  • Boxing and Wrestling Act 1981:

  • Civil Aviation Act 1990:

  • Conservation Act 1987:

  • Customs and Excise Act 1996:

  • Dog Control Act 1996:

  • Electoral Act 1993:

  • Electoral Finance Act 2007:

  • Extradition Act 1999:

  • Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993:

  • Financial Transactions Reporting Act 1996:

  • Food Act 1981:

  • Gambling Act 2003:

  • Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996:

  • Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003:

  • Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004:

  • Human Tissue Act 2008:

  • Immigration Advisers Licensing Act 2007:

  • International Crimes and International Criminal Court Act 2002:

  • International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995:

  • Land Transport Act 1998:

  • Local Government Act 2002:

  • Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978:

  • Marine Reserves Act 1971:

  • Maritime Security Act 2004:

  • Maritime Transport Act 1994:

  • Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003:

  • National Parks Act 1980:

  • Overseas Investment Act 2005:

  • Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996:

  • Petroleum Demand Restraint Act 1981:

  • Prostitution Reform Act 2003:

  • Radiation Protection Act 1965:

  • Radiocommunications Act 1989:

  • Reserves Act 1977:

  • Resource Management Act 1991:

  • Sale of Liquor Act 1989:

  • Trade in Endangered Species Act 1989:

  • Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act 2007:

  • Wild Animal Control Act 1977:

  • Wildlife Act 1953:

  • Wine Act 2003.

Subpart 2Amendments to search and seizure powers in other enactments (and to related provisions) used for regulatory purposes

Clauses 229 and 230 amend search and seizure powers that are used for regulatory purposes in the Commerce Act 1986 and the Fair Trading Act 1986, so that the provisions of Part 4 apply to those powers.

Subpart 3Other repeals and amendments

Clauses 231 to 238 amend Acts by repealing provisions that are now to be found, with some modifications, in the Bill. Clause 235 also inserts a new paragraph into section 12(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978, enabling a controlled delivery to be carried out by a person who has agreed to co-operate with Customs. It should be noted that further amendments will be required to both the Bill and other enactments once the Policing Bill (following its enactment) comes into force.

Subpart 4Regulation-making powers, transitional provisions, and review provision

Clause 239 is the regulation-making power for the Bill.

Transitional provisions

Clause 240 is a transitional provision for reporting requirements in relation to the first annual report that will be required under clause 163.

Clause 241 is a transitional provision in relation to sections 198 to 199 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957. Those sections are repealed by clause 237.

Review provision

Clause 242 provides for a review of the operation of the Act, following a referral by the Minister of Justice to be made no later than 30 June 2014.

Schedule
Search powers in other enactments to which Part 4 of Search and Surveillance Act 2008 applies

The Schedule lists search powers in enactments other than those specified in Part 5 to which some or all of the provisions of Part 4 apply.

Regulatory impact statement

Executive summary

Legislation is required to implement proposals made by the Law Commission in its report on Search and Surveillance Powers (NZLC 97). The recommendations made in the suite of Cabinet papers, if agreed to, will allow a Bill to be drafted to give effect to the Commission’s proposals and, in a small number of instances, changes in approach to that recommended by the Commission (sought by agencies since the Commission’s report was tabled and supported by the Commission). Given the wide ranging nature of reforms to the law of search and surveillance proposed by the Commission and discussed in the suite of Cabinet papers, there is no alternative to the promulgation of legislation to give effect to those recommendations and to address deficiencies in the existing law in a comprehensive manner.

Adequacy statement

The Ministry of Justice has reviewed this Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) and has determined that it is adequate according to the criteria agreed by Cabinet. The MED Regulatory Impact Analysis Unit decided not to review this RIS because it considered that the proposals contained in the suite of Cabinet papers would not significantly impact on economic growth.

Status quo and problem

Core police search powers are contained in statutes that are up to 50 years old; the law has thus become outdated and has been supplemented by case law to fill gaps in the legislation. Search powers have been granted to non-police law enforcement agencies and have developed in a piecemeal manner scattered throughout various pieces of legislation, often in an incoherent or inconsistent manner. Further, the law has not kept pace with technology. The ability of criminals to use computers and other electronic devices to commit or facilitate illegal activity needs to be matched by appropriate legislative powers to enable law enforcement agencies to extract electronic information and use surveillance devices in the investigation of criminal activity. At the same time, reasonable checks and balances must be provided against inappropriate use of those powers.

The Commission report Search and Surveillance Powers and the recommendations in the suite of Cabinet papers propose reform of the law to provide a coherent, consistent and certain approach in balancing the complementary values of law enforcement and human rights.

Objectives

The principal objective of the proposals contained in the suite of Cabinet papers is to provide coherent and effective powers of search and surveillance which will increase certainty in law enforcement and allow use of available technologies to tackle crime in the 21st century, while at the same time recognising human rights values.

Alternative options

Given the complexity of the current law and the need to consolidate and update existing statutory provisions, implement new laws and codify aspects of the common law, there is no sensible alternative to the legislation proposed in the attached suite of Cabinet papers. Ad hoc amendments to current statutes as an alternative would add to the incoherence and inaccessibility of the law. So too would the option of leaving the issues to be addressed through case law. That latter option would have the disadvantage of uncertainty and continuing costs arising from challenges to the admissibility of evidence.

Preferred option

The proposed search and surveillance powers statute to implement the recommendations contained in the suite of papers will have five main components dealing with—

  • all police search power—this will comprise the core of the legislation and will simplify and consolidate the law in one place. It will include provisions to replace section 198 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 (the general search warrant power), statutory search powers currently scattered throughout the statute book, and warrantless powers:

  • amendments to substantive search powers for non-police enforcement agencies:

  • surveillance powers for enforcement officers:

  • production powers for enforcement officers:

  • generic procedural provisions governing the exercise of search and surveillance powers by all enforcement officers. This will cover matters such as applying for and issue of search and surveillance device warrants and production orders, the way in which search powers are exercised, post-execution procedures and reporting requirements, and protections and immunities.

The benefits attaching to greater certainty and simplicity in the law will outweigh any costs associated with the implementation of the Bill.

There will be costs associated with businesses complying with production orders (to produce documents as evidential material of a specified offence to an enforcement agency following an order issued by an independent officer acting judicially), but the choice as to whether a standard search warrant or production order will be sought for use in any given case will vest with the relevant enforcement agency. On that basis it is impossible to quantify the volume of production orders that will be sought and issued. However, whatever compliance costs are incurred by businesses issued with a production notice must be off-set against the disruption that would otherwise occur by physical entry and search of business premises under a search warrant. Very often production powers will be less intrusive and involve less cost, than the use of search warrants as an alternative.

Implementation and review

The legislation will include a provision, similar to that contained in the Evidence Act 2006, that it is to be reviewed jointly by the Ministry of Justice and the Law Commission within 5 years of the date on which the legislation comes into force, and a report provided to Parliament.

Consultation

The New Zealand Police, Customs, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, Ministry of Economic Development, and Treasury have been consulted on this statement.


Hon Annette King

Search and Surveillance Powers Bill

Government Bill

300—1

Contents

Stopping vehicle without warrant to effect arrest

Warrantless searches of vehicles in public places in relation to evidential material of serious offences

Stopping vehicles with or without warrant for purposes of search

Warrantless powers relating to road blocks and road closures

Examination orders in business contexts

Examination orders in contexts other than those of business

Other provisions that apply to examination order applications

Making examination orders and contents of examination orders

Other provisions relating to examination orders

Application for surveillance device warrant

Issuing of surveillance device warrant

Carrying out activities authorised by surveillance device warrants

Other provisions applying to surveillance device warrants

Surveillance device warrant reports

Residual warrants

Application for residual warrant

Issuing of residual warrants

Carrying out activities authorised by residual warrants

Other provisions that apply to residual warrants

Residual warrant reports

Application for search warrant

Issuing of search warrant

Giving directions

Establishing search scene

Detention of person at search scene

Powers of search incidental to powers of arrest

Moving vehicle for safekeeping and other purposes

Seizure of items in plain view

Search of persons

Search warrants to enter and search vehicles

Provision of particulars and other information

Computer searches

Identification and notice

General

Examination orders and production orders

Surveillance

Search warrants and other search powers

Admission of evidence generally

Rights of owners and others in relation to things seized or produced

Amendments to Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997

Amendments to Animal Products Act 1999

Amendment to Antarctic Marine Living Resources Act 1981

Amendments to Antarctica (Environmental Protection) Act 1994

Amendments to Aviation Crimes Act 1972

Amendment to Boxing and Wrestling Act 1981

Amendments to Civil Aviation Act 1990

Amendments to Conservation Act 1987

Amendments to Customs and Excise Act 1996

Amendments to Dog Control Act 1996

Amendments to Electoral Act 1993

Amendments to Electoral Finance Act 2007

Amendments to Extradition Act 1999

Amendments to Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993

Amendments to Financial Transactions Reporting Act 1996

Amendment to Food Act 1981

Amendments to Gambling Act 2003

Amendments to Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996

Amendments to Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003

Amendments to Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004

Amendments to Human Tissue Act 2008

Amendments to Immigration Advisers Licensing Act 2007

Amendments to International Crimes and International Criminal Court Act 2000

Amendments to International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995

Amendments to Land Transport Act 1998

Amendments to Local Government Act 2002

Amendments to Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978

Amendments to Marine Reserves Act 1971

Amendments to Maritime Security Act 2004

Amendments to Maritime Transport Act 1994

Amendments to Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003

Amendments to National Parks Act 1980

Amendments to Overseas Investment Act 2005

Amendments to Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996

Amendment to Petroleum Demand Restraint Act 1981

Amendments to Prostitution Reform Act 2003

Amendments to Radiation Protection Act 1965

Amendments to Radiocommunications Act 1989

Amendments to Reserves Act 1977

Amendments to Resource Management Act 1991

Amendments to Sale of Liquor Act 1989

Amendments to Trade in Endangered Species Act 1989

Amendments to Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act 2007

Amendments to Wild Animal Control Act 1977

Amendments to Wildlife Act 1953

Amendments to Wine Act 2003

Amendments to Commerce Act 1986

Amendments to Fair Trading Act 1986

Transitional provisions

Review provision


The Parliament of New Zealand enacts as follows:

1 Title
  • This Act is the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

2 Commencement
  • This Act comes into force on 1 July 2010.

Part 1
General provisions

3 Interpretation
  • In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires,—

    arms means any firearm, airgun, pistol, restricted weapon, imitation firearm, or explosive (as those terms are defined in section 2 of the Arms Act 1983), or any ammunition

    business context, in relation to the acquisition of any information by a person, means the acquisition of the information in the person's capacity as—

    • (a) a provider of professional services or professional advice in relation to a person who is being investigated, or 1 or more of those transactions are being investigated, in respect of an offence; or

    • (b) a director, manager, officer, trustee, or employee of an entity that is being investigated, or 1 or more of whose transactions are being investigated, in respect of an offence

    chief executive

    • (a) means the chief executive (however described) of any department of State, Crown entity, local authority, or other body that employs or engages enforcement officers as part of its functions; and

    • (b) includes the Commissioner

    Commissioner means the Commissioner of Police appointed under the Police Act 1958

    controlled drug has the same meaning as in section 2 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975

    Crown entity has the same meaning as in section 7(1) of the Crown Entities Act 2004

    customs officer has the meaning given to it in section 2(1) of the Customs and Excise Act 1996

    District Court Judge means a Judge appointed under the District Courts Act 1947

    enforcement officer means any of the following persons:

    • (a) a member of the police:

    • (b) any other person authorised by this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule to exercise powers of entry, search, or seizure

    equipment includes fingerprint powder and any chemical or other substance used for law enforcement purposes

    evidential material, in relation to a particular offence, means evidence or any other item, tangible or intangible, of relevance to the investigation of the offence

    examination order means an examination order made under section 38

    intercept, in relation to a private communication, includes hear, listen to, record, monitor, acquire, or receive the communication either—

    • (a) while it is taking place; or

    • (b) while it is in transit

    interception device

    • (a) means any electronic, mechanical, electromagnetic, optical, or electro-optical instrument, apparatus, equipment, or other device that is used or is capable of being used to intercept or record a private communication (including a telecommunication); but

    • (b) does not include a hearing aid or similar device used to correct subnormal hearing of the user to no better than normal hearing

    issuing officer means—

    • (a) a Judge:

    • (b) a person, such as a Justice of the Peace, Community Magistrate, Registrar, or Deputy Registrar, who is for the time being authorised to act as an issuing officer under section 108

    Judge means a District Court Judge or a Judge of the High Court

    law enforcement agency means any department of State, Crown entity, local authority, or other body that employs or engages enforcement officers as part of its functions

    local authority means a local authority within the meaning of section 5(1) of the Local Government Act 2002

    medical practitioner means a health practitioner who is, or is deemed to be, registered with the Medical Council of New Zealand continued by section 114(1)(a) of the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003 as a practitioner of the profession of medicine

    non-business context means a context other than a business context

    non-private building means a building to which members of the public are frequently permitted to have access, and includes any part of a hospital, bus station, railway station, airport, or shop

    police bail has the same meaning as in Part 2 of the Bail Act 2000

    precursor substance has the same meaning as in section 2 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975

    private activity means activity that, in the circumstances, any 1 or more of the participants in it ought reasonably to expect is observed, intercepted, or recorded by no one except the participants

    private building means a private dwellinghouse, a marae, and any other premises that are not within the definition of non-private building

    private communication

    • (a) means a communication (whether in oral or written form, or in the form of a telecommunication, or otherwise) made under circumstances that may reasonably be taken to indicate that any party to the communication desires it to be confined to the parties to the communication; but

    • (b) does not include a communication of that kind occurring in circumstances in which any party ought reasonably to expect that the communication may be intercepted by some other person not having the express or implied consent of any party to do so

    production order means a production order made under section 74

    road block means any form of barrier or obstruction preventing or limiting the passage of vehicles

    senior member of the police means a member of the police who holds a rank of sergeant or higher, and includes any member of the police who is acting in any such rank

    surveillance device means a device that is any 1 or more of the following kinds of devices:

    • (a) an interception device:

    • (b) a tracking device:

    • (c) a visual surveillance device

    thing seized does not include anything made or generated by a person exercising a search or surveillance power (for example, photographs or audio or video recordings made by or on behalf of that person, or a forensic copy of a computer hard drive)

    tracking device means a device that, when installed in or on a thing, may be used to help ascertain, by electronic or other means, either or both of the following:

    • (a) the location of that thing or a person in possession of that thing:

    • (b) whether a thing has been opened, tampered with, or in some other way dealt with

    unique identifier, in relation to an enforcement officer, means an identifier, used to identify the officer, that is not his or her name and that—

    • (a) is assigned to him or her by the law enforcement agency that employs or engages him or her for the purposes of its operations; and

    • (b) uniquely identifies him or her in relation to the law enforcement agency

    unlawfully at large, in relation to a person, means that he or she is any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) a person for whose arrest a warrant is in force:

    • (b) unlawfully at large in terms of the Corrections Act 2004 or the Parole Act 2002:

    • (c) a prison breaker in terms of section 119 of the Crimes Act 1961:

    • (d) an escapee from lawful custody in terms of section 120 of the Crimes Act 1961:

    • (e) a special patient or restricted patient in terms of the Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992 who has escaped or failed to return on the expiry or cancellation of a period of leave:

    • (f) a care recipient or special care recipient in terms of the Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003 who has escaped or failed to return on the expiry or cancellation of a period of leave:

    • (g) a young person in terms of the Children, Young Persons, and Their Families Act 1989 who is subject to an order made under section 311(1) of that Act and who is absconding from the custody of the chief executive (as defined in that Act)

    vehicle means any conveyance that is capable of being moved under a person's control, whether or not the conveyance is used for the carriage of persons or goods, and includes a motor vehicle, aircraft, train, ship, or bicycle

    visual surveillance device means—

    • (a) any electronic, mechanical, electromagnetic, optical, or electro-optical instrument, apparatus, equipment, or other device that is used or is capable of being used to observe, or to observe and record, a private activity; but

    • (b) does not include spectacles, contact lenses, or a similar device used to correct subnormal vision of the user to no better than normal vision.

4 Act binds the Crown
  • This Act binds the Crown.

Part 2
Police powers

Subpart 1Rules about internal searches and search warrant powers in relation to places, vehicles, and other things

5 Internal searches generally prohibited
  • (1) A member of the police must not conduct an internal search of any part of the body of any person, except for, with the person's consent, searching the person's mouth.

    (2) A member of the police must not cause any other person to conduct an internal search of any part of the body of any person, except as provided in section 22 (which relates to internal searches in some circumstances of people under arrest for offences against the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975).

    (3) This section does not limit or affect sections 13A to 13M of the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978.

6 Issuing officer may issue search warrant
  • An issuing officer may issue a search warrant, in relation to a place, vehicle, or other thing, on application by a member of the police if the issuing officer is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to suspect that an offence specified in the application and punishable by imprisonment has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed; and

    • (b) to believe that the search will find evidential material in respect of the offence in the place, vehicle, or other thing specified in the application.

Subpart 2Warrantless powers to enter, search, and seize when effecting arrest

7 Entry without warrant to arrest person unlawfully at large
  • A member of the police may enter a place or vehicle without warrant to search for and arrest a person if the member has reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to suspect that a person is unlawfully at large; and

    • (b) to believe that the person is there.

8 Entry without warrant to avoid loss of offender or evidential material
  • (1) In the circumstances set out in subsection (2), a member of the police may—

    • (a) enter a place or vehicle without a warrant; and

    • (b) arrest a person that the member suspects has committed the offence.

    (2) The circumstances are that the member of the police has reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to suspect that the person has committed an offence that is punishable by imprisonment and for which he or she may be arrested without warrant; and

    • (b) to believe that the person is there; and

    • (c) to suspect that, if entry is not effected immediately, either or both of the following may occur:

      • (i) the person will leave there to avoid arrest:

      • (ii) evidential material relating to the offence for which the person is to be arrested will be destroyed, concealed, or damaged.

Stopping vehicle without warrant to effect arrest

9 Stopping vehicle to find persons unlawfully at large or who have committed certain offences
  • A member of the police may stop a vehicle without a warrant to arrest a person if the member has reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to suspect that a person—

      • (i) is unlawfully at large; or

      • (ii) has committed an offence punishable by imprisonment; and

    • (b) to believe that the person is in or on the vehicle.

10 Powers and duties of member of police after vehicle stopped
  • (1) A member of the police exercising the stopping power under section 9 may do any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) search the vehicle to locate the person referred to in section 9, if the member of the police has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is in or on the vehicle:

    • (b) search the vehicle to locate property that is evidential material in relation to the offence in respect of which the vehicle was stopped under section 9, if the person referred to in section 9

      • (i) has been arrested; or

      • (ii) is seen fleeing from the vehicle before he or she can be arrested.

    (2) Before conducting a search under a power conferred by subsection (1)(b), a member of the police must tell the driver the object of the proposed search, if the driver is not the person referred to in section 9.

Subpart 3Warrantless searches of people locked up in police custody

11 Warrantless searches of people locked up in police custody
  • (1) For the purposes of this section and section 12, a person is to be regarded as being locked up if he or she is detained in premises, or in a vehicle, that is being used for police purposes, whether or not a decision has been made to grant him or her police bail.

    (2) A member of the police, or a searcher employed for the purpose under section 12, may conduct a search of a person taken into lawful custody who is to be locked up.

    (3) A member of the police or searcher may take from the person any money or other property found during the search.

12 Searchers
  • (1) If subsection (2) applies, a member of the police in charge of a person who is taken into lawful custody and is to be locked up may employ a searcher to conduct a search of the person under section 11 (warrantless searches of people locked up in police custody).

    (2) A searcher may be employed to conduct a search under section 11 if the employment of that searcher is necessary to enable the search of the person in custody to be carried out—

    • (a) by a person of the same sex as the person to be searched; or

    • (b) within a reasonable time of the person being taken into custody.

    (3) The member of the police in charge of a person who is taken into lawful custody and is to be locked up must be satisfied that a searcher employed under this section has received appropriate training before that searcher conducts a search under section 11.

13 Property taken from people locked up in police custody
  • (1) All money and every item of property taken from a person under section 11 must be returned to him or her when he or she is released from custody, except for the following:

    • (a) any money or property that, in the opinion of a member of the police, may need to be given in evidence in proceedings arising out of a charge brought against the person:

    • (b) any money or property whose possession may, in the opinion of a member of the police, constitute an offence.

    (2) Despite subsection (1), when a person described in section 11(1) is released from police custody and is placed in the custody of another person, all money and every item of property taken from him or her under section 11 (other than money or property of a kind described in subsection (1)(a), (b), or (c)) must, if practicable, be delivered—

    • (a) to the person into whose custody he or she is released; or

    • (b) to the person in charge of the facility, if he or she is being released from police custody in order to be held in custody in the facility.

    (3) Subsection (1) is subject to an order made under—

    • (a) section 58 of the Police Act 1958; or

    • (b) section 404 of the Crimes Act 1961.

Subpart 4Warrantless powers of entry in urgent circumstances

14 Warrantless entry to prevent offence or respond to risk to life or safety
  • (1) A member of the police who has reasonable grounds to suspect that any 1 or more of the circumstances in subsection (2) exist in a place or vehicle may—

    • (a) enter the place or vehicle without a warrant; and

    • (b) take any action that he or she has reasonable grounds to believe is necessary to prevent the offending from being committed or continuing, or to avert the emergency.

    (2) The circumstances are as follows:

    • (a) an offence is being committed, or is about to be committed, that would be likely to cause injury to any person, or serious damage to, or loss of, any property:

    • (b) there is risk to the life or safety of any person that requires an emergency response.

Subpart 5Warrantless powers in relation to evidence of serious offending

15 Entry without warrant to find and avoid loss of evidential material relating to certain offences
  • A member of the police may enter and search a place without a warrant if he or she has reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to believe that evidential material is in that place; and

    • (b) to suspect—

      • (i) that the evidential material relates to an offence, punishable by imprisonment for a term of 14 years or more, that has been committed, or is being committed, or is about to be committed; and

      • (ii) that, if entry is delayed in order to obtain a search warrant, the evidential material will be destroyed, concealed, or damaged.

16 Searching people in public place without warrant for evidential material of certain offences
  • A member of the police may search a person in a public place, if the member has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is in possession of evidential material relating to an offence punishable by imprisonment for a term of 14 years or more.

Warrantless searches of vehicles in public places in relation to evidential material of serious offences

17 Warrantless entry and search of vehicle for evidential material relating to certain offences
  • A member of the police may, without a warrant, enter and search a vehicle that is in a public place if he or she has reasonable grounds to believe that evidential material relating to an offence punishable by imprisonment for a term of 14 years or more is in the vehicle.

Subpart 6Warrantless powers in relation to arms offences

18 Warrantless searches associated with arms
  • (1) A member of the police who has reasonable grounds to suspect that any 1 or more of the circumstances in subsection (2) exist in relation to a person may, without a warrant, do any or all of the following:

    • (a) search the person:

    • (b) search any thing in the person's possession or under his or her control (including a vehicle):

    • (c) enter a place or vehicle to carry out any activity under paragraph (a) or (b):

    • (d) seize and detain any arms found.

    (2) The circumstances are that the person is carrying arms, or is in possession of them, or has them under his or her control, and—

    • (a) he or she is in breach of the Arms Act 1983; or

    • (b) he or she, by reason of his or her physical or mental condition (however caused),—

      • (i) is incapable of having proper control of the arms; or

      • (ii) may kill or cause bodily injury to any person; or

    • (c) that, under the Domestic Violence Act 1995,—

      • (i) a protection order is in force against the person; or

      • (ii) there are grounds to make an application against him or her for a protection order.

    (3) A member of the police may enter a place or vehicle, search it, seize any arms found there, and detain the arms, if he or she has reasonable grounds to suspect that there are arms in the place or vehicle—

    • (a) in respect of which an indictable offence or an offence against the Arms Act 1983 has been committed, or is being committed, or is about to be committed; or

    • (b) that may be evidential material in relation to an indictable offence or an offence against the Arms Act 1983.

Subpart 7Police powers in relation to Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 offences

19 Warrantless search of places and vehicles in relation to some Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 offences
  • A member of the police may enter and search a place or vehicle without a warrant if he or she has reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to believe that in or on the place or vehicle there is—

      • (i) a controlled drug specified or described in Schedule 1 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; or

      • (ii) a controlled drug specified or described in Part 1 of Schedule 2 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; or

      • (iii) a controlled drug specified or described in Part 1 of Schedule 3 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; or

      • (iv) a precursor substance specified or described in Part 3 of Schedule 4 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; and

    • (b) to suspect that in or on the place or vehicle an offence against the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 has been committed, or is being committed in respect of that controlled drug or precursor substance; and

    • (c) to believe that, if the entry and search is not carried out immediately, evidential material relating to the suspected offence will be destroyed, concealed, or damaged.

20 Warrantless searches of people found in or on places or vehicles
  • A member of the police conducting a search of a place or vehicle under section 19 may, without a warrant, search any person found in or on the place or vehicle.

21 Warrantless power to search and detain a person, and seize controlled drugs and precursor substances if offence suspected against Misuse of Drugs Act 1975
  • (1) A member of the police may, in the circumstances set out in subsection (2), do any or all of the following without a warrant:

    • (a) search a person:

    • (b) take possession of any controlled drug or precursor substance found during the search.

    (2) The circumstances are that the member of the police has reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to believe that the person is in possession of—

      • (i) a controlled drug specified or described in Schedule 1 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; or

      • (ii) a controlled drug specified or described in Part 1 of Schedule 2 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; or

      • (iii) a controlled drug specified or described in Part 1 of Schedule 3 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; or

      • (iv) a precursor substance specified or described in Part 3 of Schedule 4 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; and

    • (b) to suspect that an offence against the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 has been committed in respect of that controlled drug or precursor substance.

    (3) This section does not—

    • (a) limit section 19 or 20; or

    • (b) authorise a member of the police to enter or search a place or vehicle except in accordance with those sections.

22 Internal search of person under arrest for offence against section 6 or 7 or 11 of Misuse of Drugs Act 1975
  • (1) In the circumstances set out in subsection (2), a member of the police may require a person to permit a medical practitioner, nominated for the purpose by the member, to conduct an internal examination of any part of the person's body by means of—

    • (a) an X-ray machine or other similar device; or

    • (b) a manual or visual examination (whether or not facilitated by any instrument or device) through any body orifice.

    (2) The circumstances are that—

    • (a) the person is under arrest for an offence against section 6 or 7 or 11 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975; and

    • (b) the member of the police has reasonable grounds to believe that the person has secreted within his or her body any property—

      • (i) that may be evidence of the offence with which the person is charged; or

      • (ii) the possession of which by the person constitutes any other offence against section 6 or 7 or 11 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975.

    (3) A medical practitioner must not conduct an internal examination if her or she—

    • (a) considers that to do so may be prejudicial to the person's health; or

    • (b) is satisfied that the person is not prepared to permit an internal examination to be conducted.

    (4) This section does not limit or affect sections 13A to 13M of the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978.

23 Effect of not permitting internal search under section 22 on bail application
  • (1) In the circumstances set out in subsection (2), a court may decline to consider a bail application by a person, and may order that the person continue to be detained in police custody, until the earlier of the following occurs:

    • (a) the expiry of 2 days after the day on which the person was required under section 22(1) to permit an internal examination by a medical practitioner:

    • (b) the person permits the examination to be conducted.

    (2) The circumstances are that—

    • (a) the person fails to permit an internal examination to be conducted under section 22; and

    • (b) the court is satisfied that the requirement under section 22(1) was properly made on reasonable grounds.

    (3) Nothing in subsection (1) limits a court's discretion to refuse bail.

    (4) This section overrides any contrary provisions about bail in the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975.

Subpart 8Warrantless powers in relation to offences against section 202A of Crimes Act 1961

24 Meaning of disabling substance and offensive weapon in this subpart
  • In this subpart,—

    disabling substance means any anaesthetising or other substance produced to use for disabling persons, or intended for such use by any person having it with him or her

    offensive weapon means any article made or altered to use for causing bodily injury, or intended for such use by the person who has it with him or her.

25 Searching people in public places without search warrant if offence against section 202A of Crimes Act 1961 suspected
  • A member of the police who has reasonable grounds to suspect that a person is committing an offence against section 202A(4)(a) of the Crimes Act 1961 (which relates to possession of knives, offensive weapons, and disabling substances) may, without a warrant,—

    • (a) stop the person and—

      • (i) search him or her; and

      • (ii) search any thing that he or she has with him or her that the member has reasonable grounds to believe contains a knife, offensive weapon, or disabling substance; and

    • (b) take possession of any knife, offensive weapon, or disabling substance found.

26 Stopping and searching vehicles without warrant if offence against section 202A of Crimes Act 1961 suspected
  • (1) A member of the police who has reasonable grounds to suspect that the circumstances in subsection (2) exist in relation to a vehicle may—

    • (a) stop and search the vehicle; and

    • (b) detain it for as long as is reasonably necessary to conduct the search; and

    • (c) take possession of any knife, offensive weapon, or disabling substance found.

    (2) The circumstances are that—

    • (a) a person travelling in the vehicle or who has alighted from it is committing an offence against section 202A(4)(a) of the Crimes Act 1961 (which relates to possession of knives, offensive weapons, and disabling substances); and

    • (b) the vehicle contains a knife, offensive weapon, or disabling substance.

Subpart 9Warrantless search of vehicle for stolen property

27 Power to search vehicles without warrant for stolen property
  • A member of the police who has reasonable grounds to believe that any stolen property is in or on any vehicle may search it without a warrant.

Subpart 10Other powers related to search of vehicles

Stopping vehicles with or without warrant for purposes of search

28 Meaning of statutory search power in this section
  • (1) In this section, a statutory search power means any power conferred by statute that expressly authorises any member of the police to search a vehicle, but does not include a power that itself authorises any member of the police to stop a vehicle.

    (2) A power conferred by statute described in subsection (1) is a statutory search power whether or not the power conferred by statute does either or both of the following:

    • (a) involves the issue of a warrant:

    • (b) authorises any person, other than a member of the police, to exercise that power.

    (3) A member of the police may stop a vehicle to conduct a search under a statutory search power to search without a warrant if he or she is satisfied that the applicable statutory grounds exist to exercise the power.

    (4) A member of the police may stop a vehicle to conduct a search under a statutory search power to search with a warrant if he or she is satisfied that the warrant has been issued and is in force.

    (5) A member of the police must not stop a vehicle under this section unless he or she is—

    • (a) in uniform; or

    • (b) wearing a distinctive cap, hat, or helmet to which a badge of authority is fixed; or

    • (c) following immediately behind the vehicle in a motor vehicle that is sounding a siren and displaying flashing blue lights, or flashing blue and red lights.

Warrantless powers relating to road blocks and road closures

29 Obtaining authorisation for warrantless road block
  • (1) This section applies to a senior member of the police in the circumstances set out in subsection (2) who—

    • (a) has reasonable grounds to believe, in relation to a vehicle, that the circumstances in subsection (2) exist; and

    • (b) is satisfied that, as far as is reasonably practicable, the safety of all road users will be ensured in the area in which it is proposed that a road block be established.

    (2) The circumstances are that the senior member of the police has reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to believe that in or on the vehicle there is a person who the member has reasonable grounds to suspect—

      • (i) has committed an offence punishable by a term of imprisonment of 7 years or more; or

      • (ii) is unlawfully at large; and

    • (b) to suspect that the vehicle will travel past the place where it is proposed that the road block be established.

    (3) A person to whom this section applies may authorise the establishment of the road block for the purpose of arresting the person.

    (4) An authorisation may be granted under this section orally or in writing.

    (5) For the purposes of this section, a person is not unlawfully at large by reason only of the fact that a warrant for his or her arrest is in force.

30 Duration and record of warrantless road block authorisation
  • (1) An authorisation under section 29

    • (a) is valid for an initial period not exceeding 24 hours, specified by the person giving the authorisation; and

    • (b) may be renewed from time to time by a District Court Judge for a single further period not exceeding 24 hours specified in writing by the Judge.

    (2) The person giving the authorisation must keep or cause to be kept a written record of the following matters:

    • (a) the location of the road block that was authorised:

    • (b) the period or periods for which the authorisation was granted or renewed:

    • (c) the grounds on which the authorisation was granted or renewed.

31 Authorised road blocks implemented without warrant
  • Any member of the police may do any or all of the following when a road block is authorised under section 29:

    • (a) establish a road block at the place specified in the authorisation:

    • (b) stop vehicles at or in the vicinity of the road block:

    • (c) require any person in or on any vehicle stopped by the road block to state any or all of his or her name, address, and date of birth:

    • (d) search the vehicle for the purpose of locating a person referred to in section 29(2)(a)(i) or (ii), if the member or any other member of the police has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is in or on the vehicle:

    • (e) require that the vehicle remain stopped for as long as is reasonably necessary to enable a member of the police to exercise any powers conferred by this section, regardless of whether the powers are exercised in respect of—

      • (i) the vehicle; or

      • (ii) the occupants of the vehicle.

32 Warrantless temporary closing of roads by police
  • (1) This section applies to a senior member of the police who is for the time being in charge at any place and has reasonable grounds to believe that the circumstances in subsection (2) exist.

    (2) The circumstances are that the senior member of the police has reasonable grounds, in relation to a place,—

    • (a) to believe that public disorder exists, or is imminent, at or adjacent to it; or

    • (b) to believe that danger to any member of the public exists or may reasonably be expected at or adjacent to it; or

    • (c) to suspect that an indictable offence not triable summarily under section 6 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 has been committed or discovered at or adjacent to it.

    (3) A person to whom this section applies—

    • (a) may close temporarily, for as long as is reasonably necessary, any road, or any part of a road, at the place, or leading to or from it, or in its vicinity; and

    • (b) must notify the relevant road controlling authority (as defined in section 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003) as soon as is reasonably practicable of any closure under paragraph (a).

    (4) A road closure under subsection (3) may be a closure to all traffic or to any specified type of traffic (including pedestrian traffic).

    (5) In this section, road includes a motorway within the meaning of the Public Works Act 1981, a private road, and a private way.

Subpart 11Examination orders

Examination orders in business contexts

33 Commissioner may apply for examination order in business context
  • (1) The Commissioner may apply to a Judge for an examination order against a person in a business context if the Commissioner is satisfied that the conditions specified in section 34 are met in respect of the person.

    (2) An application made under this section must be made in writing, and must set out the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the applicant:

    • (b) a description of the offence that it is suspected has been committed, is being committed, or will be committed:

    • (c) the facts relied on to show reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed:

    • (d) a description of the information sought to be obtained by the examination order:

    • (e) the facts relied on to show reasonable grounds to believe that the person against whom the order is sought has the information:

    • (f) the facts that indicate that the person against whom the order is sought acquired the information in respect of which the order is sought in a business context:

    • (g) the facts that indicate that the person against whom the order is sought has been given a reasonable opportunity by a member of the police to provide the information but has declined or neglected to do so.

34 Conditions for making examination order in business context
  • The conditions for making an examination order in a business context against a person are that—

    • (a) there are reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence punishable by imprisonment has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed; and

    • (b) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the person sought to be examined has information that constitutes evidential material in respect of the offence; and

    • (c) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the person sought to be examined acquired the information in respect of which the order is sought in a business context; and

    • (d) the person has been given a reasonable opportunity by a member of the police to provide that information and has declined or neglected to do so.

Examination orders in contexts other than those of business

35 Commissioner may apply for examination order in non-business context
  • (1) The Commissioner may apply to a Judge for an examination order against a person in a non-business context if the Commissioner is satisfied that the conditions specified in section 36 are met in respect of the person.

    (2) An application made under this section must be made in writing, and must set out the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the applicant:

    • (b) a description of the offence that it is suspected has been committed, is being committed, or will be committed:

    • (c) the facts relied on to show reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed:

    • (d) a description of the information sought to be obtained by the examination order:

    • (e) the facts relied on to show reasonable grounds to believe that the person against whom the order is sought has the information:

    • (f) the facts that indicate that the person against whom the order is sought acquired the information in respect of which the order is sought in a non-business context:

    • (g) the facts that indicate that the person against whom the order is sought has been given a reasonable opportunity by a member of the police to provide the information but has declined or neglected to do so.

36 Conditions for making examination order in non-business context
  • The conditions for making an examination order in a non-business context against a person are that—

    • (a) there are reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence punishable by imprisonment has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed, and the offence—

      • (i) is serious or complex fraud; or

      • (ii) has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed wholly or partly because of participation in a continuing association of 3 or more persons having as its object, or as 1 of its objects, a continuing course of criminal conduct; and

    • (b) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the person sought to be examined has information that constitutes evidential material in respect of the offence; and

    • (c) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the person sought to be examined acquired the information in respect of which the order is sought in a non-business context; and

    • (d) the person has been given a reasonable opportunity by a member of the police to provide that information and has declined or neglected to do so.

Other provisions that apply to examination order applications

37 Other provisions that apply to examination order applications
  • (1) The provisions in subsection (2) apply to any application for an examination order as if—

    • (a) any reference in those provisions to a search warrant were a reference to an examination order; and

    • (b) any reference in those provisions to an issuing officer were a reference to a Judge; and

    • (c) any reference in those provisions to a District Court were a reference to a District Court or a High Court, as the case may be.

    (2) The provisions are—

    • (a) section 98(2) (relating to requirements for further information); and

    • (b) section 99 (relating to verification of application); and

    • (c) section 100 (relating to mode of application); and

    • (d) section 101 (relating to retention of documents).

Making examination orders and contents of examination orders

38 Judge may make examination order
  • A Judge may, on an application made under section 33 or 35, make an examination order against a person if the Judge is satisfied that—

    • (a) the conditions specified in section 34 or 36, as the case may be, are met in respect of the person; and

    • (b) it is reasonable to subject the person to compulsory examination, having regard to the nature and seriousness of the suspected offending, the nature of the information sought, the relationship between the person to be examined and the suspect, and any alternative ways of obtaining the information.

39 Form and content of examination order
  • (1) An examination order made under section 38 must be in the prescribed form and must require the person against whom it is made—

    • (a) to attend before the Commissioner or a delegate of the Commissioner; and

    • (b) to answer any questions that are relevant to the information in respect of which the order was made.

    (2) The examination order must set out the following:

    • (a) the name of the person required to comply with the order:

    • (b) the grounds on which the order is made:

    • (c) the nature of the questions that the person is to be asked, being questions that are relevant to the information in respect of which the order was made:

    • (d) if the examination is to be conducted by a delegate of the Commissioner, the name of the delegate:

    • (e) where the examination is to take place:

    • (f) when the examination is to take place or how a time for the examination is to be fixed.

Other provisions relating to examination orders

40 Presence of lawyer
  • A person against whom an examination order is made must, before being required to appear before the Commissioner or the Commissioner’s delegate, be given a reasonable opportunity to arrange for a lawyer to accompany him or her.

41 Duration of examination order
  • An examination order is in force for the period specified in the order (not exceeding 30 days after the date on which the order is made).

42 Other provisions that apply to examination orders
  • Section 105 (relating to the transmission of search warrants) and section 107 (relating to when a search warrant is invalid) apply to examination orders as if—

    • (a) any reference in those provisions to a warrant or search warrant were a reference to an examination order; and

    • (b) any reference in those provisions to an issuing officer were a reference to the Judge issuing an examination order.

Subpart 12Other matters

43 Common law defence of necessity for people other than members of police not affected by this Part
  • Nothing in this Part affects the common law defence of necessity as it applies to persons who are not members of the police.

Part 3
Enforcement officers' powers and orders

Subpart 1Surveillance device warrants and residual warrants

44 Activities not requiring warrant under this subpart
  • (1) No warrant is required by an enforcement officer in any 1 or more of the following circumstances:

    • (a) the enforcement officer lawfully—

      • (i) entering a private building; and

      • (ii) recording what he or she observes or hears there:

    • (b) covert audio recording of a voluntary oral communication between 2 or more persons made with the consent of at least 1 of them:

    • (c) activities that are carried out—

      • (i) in a place or vehicle that the enforcement officer enters lawfully; and

      • (ii) by means of the enforcement officer's unaided sense of smell:

    • (d) activities carried out by the enforcement officer's use of his or her unaided visual observation or unaided sense of hearing:

    • (e) activities carried out under the authority of an interception warrant issued under section 4A(1) or (2) of the New Zealand Security Intelligence Service Act 1969:

    • (f) activities carried out by the enforcement officer's use of a surveillance device, if that use is authorised under any enactment other than this Act.

    (2) In this section,—

    unaided sense of hearing means unaided except by a hearing aid or similar device used to correct subnormal hearing of the user to no better than normal hearing

    unaided visual observation means unaided except for the use of spectacles, contact lenses, or a similar device used to correct subnormal vision of the user to no better than normal vision.

45 Surveillance device warrant need not be obtained for use of surveillance device in some situations of emergency or urgency
  • (1) An enforcement officer who is in any 1 or more of the situations set out in subsection (2) may use a surveillance device for a period not exceeding 72 hours without obtaining a surveillance device warrant, if—

    • (a) he or she is entitled to apply for a surveillance device warrant in relation to those situations; but

    • (b) obtaining a surveillance device warrant within the time in which it is proposed to undertake the surveillance is impracticable in the circumstances.

    (2) The situations are as follows:

    • (a) the enforcement officer has reasonable grounds—

      • (i) to suspect that an offence punishable by a term of imprisonment of 14 years or more has been, is being, or is about to be committed; and

      • (ii) to believe that use of the surveillance device would obtain evidential material in relation to the offence:

    • (b) the enforcement officer has reasonable grounds—

      • (i) to suspect that any 1 or more of the circumstances set out in section 14(2) exist; and

      • (ii) to believe that use of the surveillance device is necessary to prevent the offending from being committed or continuing, or to avert the emergency:

    • (c) the enforcement officer has reasonable grounds—

      • (i) to suspect that any 1 or more of the circumstances set out in section 18(2) exist; and

      • (ii) to believe that use of the surveillance device is necessary to facilitate the seizure of the arms:

    • (d) the enforcement officer has reasonable grounds—

      • (i) to suspect that an indictable offence in relation to arms or an offence against the Arms Act 1983 has been committed, or is being committed, or is about to be committed; and

      • (ii) to believe that use of the surveillance device would obtain evidential material in relation to the offence:

    • (e) the enforcement officer has reasonable grounds—

      • (i) to suspect that an offence has been committed, or is being committed, or is about to be committed in relation to a controlled drug specified or described in Schedule 1, Part 1 of Schedule 2, or Part 1 of Schedule 3 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975, or to a precursor substance specified or described in Part 3 of Schedule 4 of that Act; and

      • (ii) to believe that use of the surveillance device would obtain evidential material in relation to the offence:

    • (f) the enforcement officer has reasonable grounds—

      • (i) to suspect that a person is in possession of any 1 or more of the things described in section 81(2)(a) to (d); and

      • (ii) to believe that use of the surveillance device is necessary to facilitate the thing's seizure.

46 Activities for which surveillance device warrant required
  • Except as provided in sections 44 and 45 and this section, an enforcement officer who wishes to undertake any 1 or more of the following activities must obtain a surveillance device warrant:

    • (a) use of an interception device, or tracking device:

    • (b) observation of private activity in a private building, and any recording of that observation, by means of a visual surveillance device:

    • (c) observation of private activity in the curtilage of a private building, and any recording of that observation, if any part of the observation or recording is by means of a visual surveillance device, and the duration of the observation, for the purposes of a single investigation, or a connected series of investigations, exceeds—

      • (i) 3 hours in any 24–hour period; or

      • (ii) 8 hours in total.

Application for surveillance device warrant

47 Application for surveillance device warrant
  • (1) An application for a surveillance device warrant may be made only by an enforcement officer, and must contain, in reasonable detail, the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the applicant:

    • (b) the provision authorising the making of an application for a search warrant in respect of the suspected offence:

    • (c) the grounds on which the application is made:

    • (d) the suspected offence in regard to which the surveillance device warrant is sought:

    • (e) the type of surveillance device to be used:

    • (f) the name, address, or other description of the person, place, vehicle, or other thing that is the object of the proposed surveillance:

    • (g) a description of the evidential material believed to be able to be obtained by use of the surveillance device:

    • (h) the period for which the warrant is sought.

    (2) If the enforcement officer cannot provide all the information required under subsection (1)(f) and (g), the application must instead state the circumstances in which the surveillance is proposed to be undertaken in enough detail to identify the parameters of, and objectives to be achieved by, the proposed use of the surveillance device.

    (3) The applicant must disclose in the application—

    • (a) the details of any other applications for a search warrant, a surveillance device warrant, or a residual warrant that the applicant knows to have been made within the previous 3 months in respect of the person, place, vehicle, or other thing proposed as the object of the surveillance; and

    • (b) the result of that application or those applications.

    (4) The applicant must, before making an application for a surveillance device warrant, make reasonable inquiries within the agency in which the applicant is employed or engaged for the purpose of complying with subsection (4).

48 Conditions for issuing surveillance device warrant
  • The conditions for issuing a surveillance device warrant are that there are reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to suspect that an offence has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed in respect of which this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule authorises an enforcement officer to apply for a search warrant; and

    • (b) to believe that the proposed use of the surveillance device will obtain information that is evidential material in respect of the offence.

49 Other provisions that apply to surveillance device warrant applications
  • (1) The provisions in subsection (2) apply to any application for a surveillance device warrant as if—

    • (a) any reference in those provisions to a search warrant were a reference to a surveillance device warrant; and

    • (b) any reference in those provisions to an issuing officer were a reference to a Judge; and

    • (c) any reference in those provisions to a District Court were a reference to a District Court or a High Court, as the case may be.

    (2) The provisions are—

    • (a) section 98(2) (relating to requirements for further information); and

    • (b) section 99 (relating to verification of application); and

    • (c) section 100 (relating to mode of application); and

    • (d) section 101 (relating to retention of documents).

Issuing of surveillance device warrant

50 Who may issue surveillance device warrant
  • A surveillance device warrant may be issued only by a Judge, upon application under section 47, if he or she is satisfied that the conditions set out in section 48 are met.

51 Restrictions on issue of surveillance device warrant
  • A Judge must not issue a surveillance device warrant that would permit surveillance or recording of activity between a lawyer and his or her client that is communication of a kind to which legal professional privilege normally applies unless the Judge is satisfied that the information provided by the applicant indicates that the communication is to be made or received—

    • (a) for a dishonest purpose; or

    • (b) for the purpose of planning or committing an offence.

52 Form and content of surveillance device warrant
  • (1) Every surveillance device warrant must—

    • (a) be in the prescribed form; and

    • (b) be directed to every enforcement officer who has authority to carry out the activities authorised by the surveillance device warrant; and

    • (c) specify the period, of no more than 60 days after the date on which the warrant is issued, for which it is in force; and

    • (d) contain a condition that, in accordance with section 55, a surveillance device warrant report must be provided to a Judge of the same court as the Judge who issues the warrant within 1 month after the expiry of the period for which it is in force; and

    • (e) contain a condition that the enforcement officer carrying out the activities authorised by the warrant must not use any communication obtained under the authority of the warrant unless the privilege is waived or its use is authorised by a Judge, if he or she has reasonable grounds to believe that the communication may be subject to a privilege specified in section 131.

    (2) A surveillance device warrant may be subject to any other conditions specified in the warrant that the Judge issuing it considers reasonable, including a requirement for inclusion of specified information in the surveillance device warrant report provided under section 55.

    (3) Every surveillance device warrant must also contain, in reasonable detail, the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the Judge issuing the warrant and the date of issue:

    • (b) the provision authorising the making of an application for a search warrant in respect of the suspected offence:

    • (c) the type of surveillance device the use of which the warrant authorises:

    • (d) the name, address, or other description of the person, place, vehicle, or other thing that is the object of the proposed surveillance:

    • (e) the evidential material relating to the suspected offence that may be obtained by use of the surveillance device:

    • (f) that an enforcement officer carrying out the activities authorised by the warrant may use any assistance that is reasonable in the circumstances:

    • (g) that an enforcement officer carrying out the activities authorised by the warrant may do any or all of the following, using any force that is reasonable in the circumstances to do so, in order to install, maintain, or remove the surveillance device, or to access and use electricity to power the surveillance device:

      • (i) enter any premises, area, or vehicle specified in the warrant:

      • (ii) break open or interfere with any vehicle or other thing:

      • (iii) temporarily remove any vehicle or other thing from any place where it is found and to return it to that place.

    (4) Despite subsection (3)(d) and (e), if the Judge has not been provided in the application, or otherwise, with the information specified in those provisions because the applicant is unable to provide it, the warrant must instead state the details (as provided under section 47(2) or otherwise) of the circumstances in which the surveillance is to be undertaken in enough detail to identify the parameters of, and objectives to be achieved by, the use of the surveillance device.

    (5) Despite subsection (1)(c), a Judge may issue a further surveillance device warrant in respect of the same suspected offence in regard to which the Judge, or another Judge, has previously issued a surveillance device warrant.

Carrying out activities authorised by surveillance device warrants

53 Carrying out activities authorised by surveillance device warrant
  • A surveillance device warrant allows the following persons to carry out the activities authorised by it:

    • (a) any or all of the persons to whom it is directed:

    • (b) any assistant—

      • (i) who is called upon by a person specified in paragraph (a) to help him or her to carry out the activities; and

      • (ii) who, at all times that he or she is carrying out activities authorised by the warrant, remains under the supervision of a person specified in paragraph (a).

Other provisions applying to surveillance device warrants

54 Other provisions that apply to surveillance device warrants
  • Section 105 (relating to the transmission of search warrants) and section 107 (relating to when a search warrant is invalid) apply to surveillance device warrants as if—

    • (a) any reference in those provisions to a warrant or search warrant were a reference to a surveillance device warrant; and

    • (b) any reference in those provisions to an issuing officer were a reference to the Judge issuing a surveillance device warrant.

Surveillance device warrant reports

55 Surveillance device warrant report
  • (1) A person who carries out the activities authorised by a surveillance device warrant must provide a surveillance device warrant report within 1 month after the expiry of the period for which the warrant is in force, as specified in the warrant, to a Judge of the same court as the Judge who issued the warrant.

    (2) The surveillance device warrant report must contain the following information:

    • (a) whether carrying out the activities authorised by the surveillance device warrant resulted in obtaining evidential material:

    • (b) the circumstances in which the surveillance device was used:

    • (c) any other information stated in the warrant as being required for inclusion in the surveillance device warrant report.

56 Report on use of surveillance device in situation of urgency or emergency
  • (1) An enforcement officer who uses a surveillance device under the authority of section 45 must provide a report to a Judge within 1 month after the date of the last day of any period of 72 hours or less over which the surveillance device was used.

    (2) The report made under subsection (1) must contain the following information:

    • (a) whether the use of the surveillance device resulted in—

      • (i) obtaining evidential material of the relevant offence (in the case of use of a surveillance device in a situation set out in section 45(2)(a), (d), or (e)); or

      • (ii) preventing the offending from being committed or continuing, or averting the emergency (in the case of use of a surveillance device in a situation set out in section 45(2)(b)); or

      • (iii) facilitating the seizure of the arms (in the case of use of a surveillance device in a situation set out in section 45(2)(c)); and

    • (b) the circumstances in which the surveillance device was used.

    (3) A Judge who receives a report under subsection (1) may require the enforcement officer who used the surveillance device to supply further information regarding circumstances surrounding the use of the surveillance device.

57 Actions on receipt of surveillance device warrant report
  • (1) A Judge receiving a surveillance device warrant report under section 55 may do any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) give directions as to the destruction or retention of the material obtained as a result of the surveillance:

    • (b) if he or she considers that the surveillance activities carried out were in breach of any of the conditions of the warrant's issue, or of any applicable statutory provision, report on the breach to the chief executive of the relevant agency:

    • (c) order that the subject of the surveillance be notified.

    (2) The Judge must not make an order under subsection (1)(c) unless he or she is satisfied that—

    • (a) the circumstances set out in subsection (3) exist; and

    • (b) the warrant—

      • (i) should not have been issued; or

      • (ii) there has been a serious breach of any of the conditions of its issue, or of any applicable statutory provision.

    (3) The circumstances are that the public interest in notification outweighs any potential prejudice to any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) any investigation by the law enforcement agency:

    • (b) the safety of informants or undercover officers:

    • (c) the supply of information to the law enforcement agency:

    • (d) any international relationships of the law enforcement agency.

58 Actions on receipt of report on use of surveillance device in situation of urgency or emergency
  • (1) A Judge receiving a surveillance device warrant report under section 56 may do any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) give directions as to the destruction or retention of the material obtained as a result of the use of the surveillance device:

    • (b) if he or she considers that the use of the surveillance device was not authorised under section 45, report accordingly to the chief executive of the relevant agency:

    • (c) order that the subject of the surveillance be notified.

    (2) The Judge must not make an order under subsection (1)(c) unless he or she is satisfied that—

    • (a) the circumstances set out in subsection (3) exist; and

    • (b) use of the surveillance device was a serious breach of the criteria set out in section 45.

    (3) The circumstances are that the public interest in notification outweighs any potential prejudice to any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) any investigation by the law enforcement agency:

    • (b) the safety of informants or undercover officers:

    • (c) the supply of information to the law enforcement agency:

    • (d) any international relationships of the law enforcement agency.

Residual warrants

59 Residual warrant required for some other interferences with privacy
  • A law enforcement agency must obtain a residual warrant if, in order to obtain evidential material relating to an offence, the agency wishes to use a device (other than a surveillance device as defined in section 3), or a technique, procedure, or activity that may constitute an intrusion into the reasonable expectation of privacy of any person.

Application for residual warrant

60 Application for residual warrant
  • (1) An application for a residual warrant may be made only by an enforcement officer, and must contain, in reasonable detail, the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the applicant:

    • (b) the provision authorising the making of an application for a search warrant in respect of the offence:

    • (c) the grounds on which the application is made:

    • (d) the suspected offence in regard to which the residual warrant is sought:

    • (e) a description, with as much specificity as possible, of the device, technique, procedure, or activity to be used or undertaken:

    • (f) the name, address, or other description of the person, place, vehicle, or other thing that is the object of the proposed use of the device, technique, procedure, or activity:

    • (g) a description of the evidential material believed to be able to be obtained by the proposed use:

    • (h) the period for which the warrant is sought.

    (2) If the enforcement officer cannot provide all the information required under subsection (1)(f) and (g), the application must instead state the circumstances in which the use of the device, technique, procedure, or activity is proposed to be undertaken in enough detail to identify the parameters of, and objectives to be achieved by, the proposed use.

    (3) The applicant must disclose in the application—

    • (a) the details of any other applications for a search warrant, a surveillance device warrant, or a residual warrant, that the applicant knows to have been made within the previous 3 months in respect of the person, place, vehicle, or other thing proposed as the object of the proposed use of the device, technique, procedure, or activity; and

    • (b) the result of that application or those applications.

    (4) The applicant must, before making an application for a residual warrant, make reasonable inquiries within the agency in which the applicant is employed or engaged for the purpose of complying with subsection (4).

61 Conditions for issuing residual warrant
  • The conditions for issuing a residual warrant are that there are reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to suspect that an offence has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed in respect of which this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule authorises an enforcement officer to apply for a search warrant; and

    • (b) to believe that the proposed use of the device (other than a surveillance device as defined in section 3), technique, procedure, or activity in respect of which the residual warrant is sought would obtain information that is evidential material in respect of the offence.

62 Other provisions that apply to residual warrant applications
  • (1) The provisions in subsection (2) apply to any application for a residual warrant as if—

    • (a) any reference in those provisions to a search warrant were a reference to a residual warrant; and

    • (b) any reference in those provisions to an issuing officer were a reference to a Judge; and

    • (c) any reference in those provisions to a District Court were a reference to a District Court or a High Court, as the case may be.

    (2) The provisions are—

    • (a) section 98(2) (relating to requirements for further information); and

    • (b) section 99 (relating to verification of application); and

    • (c) section 100 (relating to mode of application); and

    • (d) section 101 (relating to retention of documents).

Issuing of residual warrants

63 Who may issue residual warrant
  • A residual warrant may be issued only by a Judge, upon application under section 60, if he or she is satisfied that—

    • (a) the conditions set out in section 61 are met; and

    • (b) there is no enactment other than this subpart of this Act that provides the power or authority to obtain the evidential material in respect of which the residual warrant is sought.

64 Restrictions on issue of residual warrant
  • A Judge must not issue a residual warrant that would permit surveillance or recording of activity between a lawyer and his or her client that is communication of a kind to which legal professional privilege normally applies unless the Judge is satisfied that the information provided by the applicant indicates that the communication is to be made, received, completed, or prepared—

    • (a) for a dishonest purpose; or

    • (b) for the purpose of planning or committing an offence.

65 Form and content of residual warrant
  • (1) Every residual warrant must—

    • (a) be in the prescribed form; and

    • (b) be directed to every enforcement officer who has authority to carry out the activities authorised by the warrant; and

    • (c) specify the period, of no more than 60 days after the date on which the warrant is issued, for which it is in force; and

    • (d) contain a condition that, in accordance with section 68, a residual warrant report must be provided to a Judge of the same court as the Judge who issues the warrant within 1 month after the expiry of the period for which it is in force; and

    • (e) contain a condition that the enforcement officer carrying out the activities authorised by the warrant must not use any communication obtained under the authority of the warrant unless the privilege is waived or its use is authorised by a Judge, if he or she has reasonable grounds to believe that the communication may be subject to a privilege specified in section 131.

    (2) A residual warrant may be subject to any other conditions specified in the warrant that the Judge issuing it considers reasonable, including a requirement for inclusion of specified information in the residual warrant report provided under section 68.

    (3) Every residual warrant must also contain, in reasonable detail, the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the Judge issuing the warrant and the date of issue:

    • (b) the provision authorising the making of an application for a search warrant in respect of the suspected offence:

    • (c) a description, with as much specificity as possible, of the device, technique, procedure, or activity the use of which the warrant authorises:

    • (d) the name, address, or other description of the person, place, vehicle, or other thing that is the object of the proposed use of the device, technique, procedure, or activity:

    • (e) the evidential material relating to the suspected offence that may be obtained by the proposed use:

    • (f) that the enforcement officer carrying out the activities authorised by the warrant may use any assistance that is reasonable in the circumstances:

    • (g) that the enforcement officer carrying out the activities authorised by the warrant may do any or all of the following, using any force that is reasonable in the circumstances to do so, in order to install, maintain, or remove a device the use of which is authorised by the warrant, or to access and use electricity to power the device:

      • (i) enter on to any premises, area, or vehicle specified in the warrant:

      • (ii) break open or interfere with any thing:

      • (iii) temporarily remove any thing from any place where it is found and return the thing to that place.

    (4) Despite subsection (3)(d) and (e), if the Judge has not been provided in the application, or otherwise, with the information specified in those provisions because the applicant is unable to provide it, the warrant must instead state the details (as provided under section 60(2) or otherwise) of the circumstances in which the use of the device, technique, procedure, or activity is to be undertaken in enough detail to identify the parameters of, and objectives to be achieved by, the use of the device, technique, procedure, or activity.

    (5) Despite subsection (1)(c), a Judge may issue a further residual warrant in respect of the same suspected offence in regard to which the Judge, or another Judge, has previously issued a residual warrant.

Carrying out activities authorised by residual warrants

66 Carrying out activities authorised by residual warrant
  • A residual warrant allows the following persons to carry out the activities authorised by it:

    • (a) any or all of the persons to whom it is directed:

    • (b) any assistant—

      • (i) who is called upon by a person specified in paragraph (a) to help him or her to carry out the activities; and

      • (ii) who, at all times that he or she is carrying out activities authorised by the warrant, remains under the supervision of a person specified in paragraph (a).

Other provisions that apply to residual warrants

67 Other provisions that apply to residual warrants
  • Section 105 (relating to the transmission of search warrants) and section 107 (relating to when a search warrant is invalid) apply to residual warrants as if—

    • (a) any reference in those provisions to a warrant or search warrant were a reference to a residual warrant; and

    • (b) any reference in those provisions to an issuing officer were a reference to the Judge issuing a residual warrant.

Residual warrant reports

68 Residual warrant report
  • (1) A person who carries out the activities authorised by a residual warrant must provide a residual warrant report within 1 month after the expiry of the period for which the warrant is in force, as specified in the warrant, to a Judge of the same court as the Judge who issued the warrant.

    (2) The residual warrant report must contain the following information:

    • (a) whether carrying out the activities authorised by the residual warrant resulted in obtaining evidential material:

    • (b) the circumstances in which the device, technique, procedure, or activity that the warrant authorised was used:

    • (c) any other information stated in the warrant as being required for inclusion in the residual warrant report.

69 Actions on receipt of report
  • (1) A Judge receiving a residual warrant report under section 68 may do any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) give directions as to the destruction or retention of the material obtained as a result of the use of the device, technique, procedure, or activity:

    • (b) if he or she considers that the activities carried out were in breach of any of the conditions of the warrant's issue, or of any applicable statutory provision, report on the breach to the chief executive of the relevant agency:

    • (c) order that the subject of the device, technique, procedure, or activity be notified.

    (2) The Judge must not make an order under subsection (1)(c) unless he or she is satisfied that the circumstances set out in subsection (3) exist, and—

    • (a) the warrant should not have been issued; or

    • (b) there has been a serious breach of any of the conditions of its issue, or of any applicable statutory provision.

    (3) The circumstances are that the public interest in notification outweighs any potential prejudice to any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) any investigation by the law enforcement agency:

    • (b) the safety of informants or undercover officers:

    • (c) the supply of information to the law enforcement agency:

    • (d) any international relationships of the law enforcement agency.

Subpart 2Production and monitoring orders

70 Interpretation
  • In this subpart,—

    call-related information, in relation to a telecommunication, means any of the following in regard to which a network operator has an interception capability at the time an application is made under section 71 for a production order against that network operator:

    • (a) information that is generated as a result of the making of the telecommunication (whether or not the telecommunication is sent or received successfully), and identifies the origin, direction, destination, or termination of the telecommunication, and includes—

      • (i) the number from which the telecommunication originates; and

      • (ii) the number to which the telecommunication is sent; and

      • (iii) if the telecommunication is diverted from one number to another number, those numbers; and

      • (iv) the time at which the telecommunication is sent; and

      • (v) the duration of the telecommunication; and

      • (vi) if the telecommunication is generated from a mobile telephone, the point at which the telecommunication first enters a network:

    • (b) the content of the telecommunication

    document includes call-related information

    interception capability and network operator have the same meanings as in section 3(1) of the Telecommunications (Interception Capability) Act 2004.

71 Enforcement officer may apply for production order
  • (1) An enforcement officer who may apply for a search warrant to obtain documents may apply to an issuing officer for a production order against a person in respect of those documents if the enforcement officer is satisfied that the conditions, specified in section 72, for making the order against the person are met.

    (2) An application under this section must be in writing and must set out the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the applicant:

    • (b) a description of the offence that it is suspected has been committed, is being committed, or will be committed:

    • (c) the facts relied on to show reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed:

    • (d) a description of the documents for which production is sought:

    • (e) the facts relied on to show reasonable grounds to believe the documents sought are in the possession or under the control of the person against whom the order is sought:

    • (f) whether the person against whom the order is made should be required to produce,—

      • (i) on 1 occasion only, those documents for which production is sought that are in his or her possession or under his or her control when the order is made; or

      • (ii) on an ongoing basis, those documents for which production is sought in his or her possession or under his or her control at the time the order is made, or which come into his or her possession or come under his or her control at any time while the order is in force.

72 Conditions for making production order
  • The conditions for making a production order are that there are reasonable grounds—

    • (a) to suspect that an offence has been committed, or is being committed, or will be committed (being an offence in respect of which this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule authorises an enforcement officer to apply for a search warrant); and

    • (b) to believe that the documents sought by the proposed order—

      • (i) constitute evidential material in respect of the offence; and

      • (ii) are in the possession or under the control of the person against whom the order is sought, or will come into his or her possession or under his or her control while the order is in force.

73 Other provisions that apply to production order applications
  • (1) The provisions in subsection (2) apply to any application for a production order as if any reference in those provisions to a warrant or search warrant were a reference to a production order.

    (2) The provisions are—

    • (a) section 98(2) (relating to requirements for further information); and

    • (b) section 99 (relating to verification of application); and

    • (c) section 100 (relating to mode of application); and

    • (d) section 101 (relating to retention of documents).

74 Issuing officer may make production order
  • An issuing officer may make a production order against a person if satisfied, on an application made under section 71, that the conditions, specified in section 72, for making the order are met.

75 Form and content of production order
  • (1) A production order must be in the prescribed form and must require the person against whom it is made (person A)—

    • (a) to give the enforcement officer who applied for the order, or a person identified in the order, any documents described in the order that are in the possession or under the control of person A, or that come into the possession or under the control of person A while the order is in force; and

    • (b) if any of those documents are not, or are no longer, in the possession or under the control of person A, to disclose, to the best of person A's knowledge or belief, the location of those documents to the enforcement officer who applied for the order or to the person identified in the order.

    (2) The production order must set out the following:

    • (a) the name of person A:

    • (b) the grounds on which the order is made:

    • (c) the documents required to be given:

    • (d) whether the documents must be produced on 1 occasion only, or whether they are required to be produced on an ongoing basis for the duration of the entire order:

    • (e) the time by which, and the way in which, the documents must be produced.

    (3) The production order may describe the documents required to be given by reference to a class or category of document.

    (4) If the production order is made against a body corporate or an unincorporated body, the order may specify an individual (whether by name or by reference to a position held in the body) who is to comply with the order as the body’s representative.

76 Duration of production order
  • A production order is in force for the period specified in the order (not exceeding 30 days after the date on which the order is made).

77 Other provisions applying to production orders
  • Section 105 (relating to the transmission of search warrants) and section 107 (relating to when a search warrant is invalid) apply to production orders as if any reference in those provisions to a warrant or search warrant were a reference to a production order.

78 Documents produced under production order
  • When any document is produced in compliance with a production order, the enforcement officer who applied for the order may do any 1 or more of the following things:

    • (a) retain the original document produced if it is relevant to the investigation, provided that a copy of the document is taken and returned as soon as practicable after the document is produced:

    • (b) take copies of the document, or of extracts from the document:

    • (c) if necessary, require the person producing the document to reproduce, or to assist any person nominated by the chief executive or a delegate of the chief executive to reproduce, in usable form, any information recorded or stored in the document.

Subpart 3Police and customs officer powers to search in relation to delivery under section 12 of Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978

79 Application of Part 4 provisions to this subpart
  • The provisions of Part 4 apply to searches conducted under this subpart.

80 Meaning of terms used in this subpart
  • In this subpart, unless the context otherwise requires, craft, package, and vehicle have the same meanings as in section 2(1) of the Customs and Excise Act 1996.

81 Searches of persons, places, and vehicles relating to deliveries under section 12 of Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978
  • (1) In the circumstances set out in subsection (2), a member of the police or a customs officer may, during the course of a delivery in relation to which he or she has exercised his or her powers under section 12 of the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978, do any or all of the following without a warrant:

    • (a) search a person involved in a delivery under section 12 of the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978:

    • (b) detain him or her for the purposes of the search:

    • (c) enter and search any place, craft, or vehicle:

    • (d) seize anything that he or she has reasonable grounds to believe is a thing described in any of paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (2).

    (2) The circumstances are that the member of the police or the customs officer has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is in possession of, or the place, craft, or vehicle contains, any 1 or more of the following:

    • (a) a controlled drug:

    • (b) a precursor substance:

    • (c) a package in relation to which the customs officer has replaced all or a portion of any controlled drug or precursor substance:

    • (d) evidential material in relation to the commission of an offence under section 6(1)(a) or 12AB of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975.

Subpart 4Warrantless powers of entry and search incidental to arrest or detention

82 Application of this subpart
  • This subpart applies to any person who has a power of arrest, or detention, or both under this Act or any other enactment.

83 Entry without warrant after arrest
  • (1) A person to whom this subpart applies who has arrested a person and has reasonable grounds to believe that the circumstances in subsection (2) exist in a place may enter it without a warrant to search for and seize any evidential material relating to the offence for which the person was arrested.

    (2) The circumstances are—

    • (a) that evidential material relating to the offence for which the person was arrested is in that place; and

    • (b) that, if entry is delayed in order to obtain a search warrant, evidential material relating to the offence for which the person is to be arrested will be destroyed, concealed, or damaged.

84 Warrantless entry and search of vehicle after arrest
  • A person to whom this subpart applies who has arrested a person and who has reasonable grounds to believe that evidential material relating to the offence for which the person was arrested is in a vehicle may enter and search it without a warrant.

85 Rub-down search of arrested or detained person
  • (1) A person to whom this subpart applies may carry out a rub-down search of a person, in accordance with this section, when the person is arrested, or detained pursuant to a statutory power of detention, in order to ensure that the person is not carrying anything that may be used—

    • (a) to harm any person; or

    • (b) to facilitate the person’s escape.

    (2) For the purposes of this section and sections 86 and 87, a rub-down search means a search of a clothed person in which the person conducting the search may do any or all of the following:

    • (a) run or pat his or her hand over the body of the person being searched, whether outside or inside the clothing (other than the underclothing) of that person:

    • (b) insert his or her hand inside any pocket or pouch in the clothing (other than the underclothing) of the person being searched:

    • (c) for the purpose of permitting a visual inspection, require the person being searched to do any or all of the following:

      • (i) open his or her mouth:

      • (ii) display the palms of his or her hands:

      • (iii) display the soles of his or her feet:

      • (iv) lift or rub his or her hair.

86 Things that can be done to facilitate rub-down search
  • (1) For the purpose of facilitating any of the actions referred to in any of paragraphs (a) to (c) of section 88(2), the person conducting a rub-down search may require the person being searched—

    • (a) to remove, raise, lower, or open any outer clothing (including (without limitation) any coat, jacket, jumper, or cardigan) being worn by the person being searched, except where that person has no other clothing, or only underclothing, under that outer clothing; and

    • (b) to remove any head covering, gloves, or footwear (including socks or stockings) being worn by that person.

    (2) A rub-down search of a person may include searching—

    • (a) any item carried by, or in the possession of, the person; and

    • (b) any outer clothing removed, raised, lowered, or opened for the purposes of the search; and

    • (c) any head covering, gloves, or footwear (including socks or stockings) removed for the purposes of the search.

87 Rub-down search may include visual examination
  • A rub-down search may include a visual examination (whether or not facilitated by any instrument or device designed to illuminate or magnify) of the mouth, nose, and ears, but must not include the insertion of any instrument, device, or thing into any of those orifices.

88 Warrantless search of arrested or detained person
  • (1) A person to whom this subpart applies may, in the circumstances set out in subsection (2), carry out a search of a person.

    (2) The circumstances are that the person to whom this subpart applies has reasonable grounds to believe that there is anything on or carried by a person who is arrested or detained pursuant to a statutory power of detention that—

    • (a) may be used to harm any person; or

    • (b) may be used to facilitate the person’s escape; or

    • (c) is evidential material relating to the offence in respect of which the arrest is made or the person is detained.

Part 4
General provisions in relation to search and inspection powers

Subpart 1Application of rules and consent searches

89 Application of rules in relation to enforcement officers and transfer of things between law enforcement agencies, etc
  • (1) Any duty imposed on an enforcement officer under this Part may be carried out instead by an enforcement officer employed or engaged by the same law enforcement agency as the other enforcement officer.

    (2) Subsection (3) applies if any thing is seized by or produced to a person employed or engaged by any law enforcement agency and the thing is then transferred to another law enforcement agency for the purposes of investigation or prosecution.

    (3) If this subsection applies, the obligations imposed by this Part on any law enforcement agency or any enforcement officer engaged by that agency must, after the transfer of the thing referred to in subsection (2), be carried out by the law enforcement agency to which the thing is transferred or an enforcement officer employed by that agency.

90 Application of rules about consent searches
  • Sections 91 to 94 apply in respect of consent searches undertaken by an enforcement officer in circumstances where a power of search by an enforcement officer to which this Part applies or any provisions of this Part apply (whether a warrantless power or a power able to be conferred by a search warrant) could be exercised if the officer held a particular belief or suspicion.

91 Purposes for which consent search may be undertaken
  • An enforcement officer may ask a person to consent to undergo a search or to consent to a search being made of a place, vehicle, or other thing apparently in the control of the person, if the enforcement officer wishes to conduct the search for 1 or more of the following purposes:

    • (a) to prevent the commission of an offence:

    • (b) to protect life or property, or to prevent injury or harm:

    • (c) to investigate whether an offence has been committed:

    • (d) any purpose in respect of which the enforcement officer could exercise a power of search conferred by an enactment, if he or she held a particular belief or suspicion specified in the enactment.

92 Advice that must be given before consent search undertaken
  • Before conducting a search by consent, the enforcement officer who proposes to conduct it must—

    • (a) determine that the search is for a purpose authorised by section 91; and

    • (b) advise the person from whom consent is sought of the reason for the proposed search; and

    • (c) advise the person that he or she may either consent to the search, or refuse to consent to the search.

93 Circumstances where search by consent unlawful
  • A search by consent is unlawful if—

    • (a) it is not for a purpose set out in section 91; or

    • (b) the enforcement officer fails to comply with section 92(a), (b), or (c); or

    • (c) the search is undertaken in reliance on a consent given by a person who does not have authority to give that consent.

94 Ability of persons under 14 years to consent to searches of places, vehicles, or other things
  • (1) A person under 14 years of age is unable to consent to the search of a place, vehicle, or other thing.

    (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a person under 14 years of age who is found driving a vehicle with no passenger of or over the age of 14 years with authority to consent to the search of the vehicle.

95 Exceptions to consent search rules
  • Sections 91 to 94 do not—

    • (a) apply to a search conducted as a condition of entry to any public or private place; or

    • (b) apply to a search conducted in accordance with a power conferred by an enactment; or

    • (c) affect the rule of law relating to the implied licence to enter property.

Subpart 2Search warrants

96 Application of sections 97 to 101
  • The provisions of sections 97 to 101 apply in respect of every warrant applied for, or issued, under this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule that would enable entry and search of any land, premises, place, vehicle, or other thing (a search warrant).

97 Interpretation
  • In this subpart, unless the context otherwise requires,—

    applicant means any of the following persons:

    • (a) a member of the police:

    • (b) any other person authorised by this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule to apply for a search warrant

    thing includes an intangible thing (for example, an email address or access information to an Internet data storage facility).

Application for search warrant

98 Application for search warrant
  • (1) An application for a search warrant must contain, in reasonable detail, the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the applicant:

    • (b) the provision authorising the making of the application:

    • (c) the grounds on which the application is made (including the reasons why the legal requirements for issuing the warrant are believed by the applicant to be satisfied):

    • (d) the address or other description of the place, vehicle, or other thing proposed to be searched:

    • (e) a description of the item or items or other evidential material believed to be in or on or part of the place, vehicle, or other thing that are sought by the applicant:

    • (f) the period for which the warrant is sought:

    • (g) if the applicant wants to be able to execute the warrant on more than 1 occasion, the grounds on which execution on more than 1 occasion is believed to be necessary.

    (2) The issuing officer—

    • (a) may require the applicant to supply further information concerning the grounds on which the search warrant is sought; but

    • (b) must not, in any circumstances, require the applicant to disclose the name, address, or any other identifying detail of an informant (within the meaning of section 6(1) of the Criminal Disclosure Act 2008) unless, and only to the extent that, such information is necessary for the issuing officer to assess either or both of the following:

      • (i) the credibility of the informant:

      • (ii) whether there is a proper basis for issuing the warrant.

    (3) The applicant must disclose in the application—

    • (a) details of any other application for a search warrant that the applicant knows to have been made within the previous 3 months in respect of the place, vehicle, or other thing proposed to be searched; and

    • (b) the result of that application or those applications.

    (4) The applicant must, before making an application for a search warrant, make reasonable inquiries within the law enforcement agency in which the applicant is employed or engaged, for the purpose of complying with subsection (3).

    (5) The issuing officer may authorise the search warrant to be executed on more than 1 occasion during the period in which the warrant is in force if he or she is satisfied that this is required for the purposes for which the warrant is being issued.

99 Application must be verified
  • An application for a search warrant must contain or be accompanied by a statement by the applicant confirming the truth and accuracy of the contents of the application.

100 Mode of application for search warrant
  • (1) An application for a search warrant—

    • (a) must be in writing, unless subsection (3) applies; and

    • (b) may be transmitted to the issuing officer electronically.

    (2) The applicant must appear in person before, or communicate orally with, the issuing officer, unless subsection (5) applies.

    (3) An issuing officer may allow an application for a search warrant to be made orally (for example, by telephone call) or by personal appearance and excuse the applicant from putting all or any part of the application (including any required material) in writing if—

    • (a) the issuing officer is satisfied that the delay that would be caused by requiring an applicant to put all or any part of the application (including any required material) in writing would compromise the effectiveness of the search; and

    • (b) the issuing officer is satisfied that the question of whether the warrant should be issued can properly be determined on the basis of an oral communication or a personal appearance (together with the material described in paragraph (c)); and

    • (c) the information required by section 98(1) to (3) is supplied (whether orally, or partly orally and partly in writing) to the issuing officer.

    (4) An issuing officer who allows an application for a search warrant to be made under subsection (3) must record the grounds for the application as soon as practicable.

    (5) An issuing officer may allow an application for a search warrant to be made without either an appearance in person or an oral communication with the issuing officer if—

    • (a) the issuing officer is satisfied that there are special circumstances that prevent the making of either a personal appearance before, or an oral communication with, the issuing officer, without an undue delay that would compromise the effectiveness of the search; and

    • (b) the issuing officer is satisfied that the question of whether the search warrant should be issued can properly be determined on the basis of any written communication by the applicant (including the material described in paragraph (c)); and

    • (c) the information required by section 98(1) to (3) has been supplied to the issuing officer.

    (6) An issuing officer who allows an application for a search warrant to be made without either an appearance in person or an oral communication by the applicant must record the grounds for the application as soon as practicable.

101 Retention of documents
  • (1) A copy (whether in electronic form or otherwise) of every written application for a search warrant, or (in the case of an oral application) the record of the application made by the issuing officer, must be retained under the control of the Registrar of the District Court at which, or under the control of the Registrar of the District Court that is closest to the place at which, the application was made, until,—

    • (a) in a case where a search warrant is issued, the completion of any proceedings in respect of which the validity of the warrant may be in issue; and

    • (b) in any other case, the expiry of 2 years after the records were first retained under the control of the Registrar of a District Court.

    (2) An applicant to whom a search warrant is issued must retain (whether in electronic form or otherwise) the warrant, a copy of the application (if made in written form), all documents tendered by the applicant in support of the application, and a copy of any search warrant report referred to in section 104 required to be prepared, until,—

    • (a) in the case of a warrant that is executed, the completion of any proceedings in respect of which the validity of the warrant may be in issue; and

    • (b) in any other case, the destruction or transfer of the warrant and other documents is required by the Public Records Act 2005 or any other enactment or rule of law.

Issuing of search warrant

102 Restrictions on issue of search warrant
  • An issuing officer must not issue a warrant to seize any thing held by a lawyer that is a communication of a kind to which legal professional privilege normally applies unless the issuing officer is satisfied that the information provided by the applicant indicates that the thing was made, received, completed, or prepared—

    • (a) for a dishonest purpose; or

    • (b) for the purpose of planning or committing an offence.

103 Form and content of search warrant
  • (1) Every search warrant issued must be in the prescribed form.

    (2) Every search warrant issued must be directed to every enforcement officer who has authority to execute the warrant.

    (3) A search warrant may be—

    • (a) executed by any or all of the persons to whom it is directed:

    • (b) subject to any conditions specified in the warrant that the issuing officer considers reasonable, including (without limitation)—

      • (i) any restriction on the time of execution that is reasonable:

      • (ii) a condition that the occupier or person in charge of a place must provide reasonable assistance to a person executing the warrant if, in the absence of such assistance, it would not be practical to execute the warrant without undue delay:

    • (c) executed only once, unless execution on more than 1 occasion has been authorised.

    (4) Every search warrant must contain, in reasonable detail, the following particulars:

    • (a) the name of the issuing officer and the date of issue:

    • (b) the provisions authorising the issue of the warrant (including, where relevant, the suspected offence or offences):

    • (c) that the person executing the warrant may use any assistance that is reasonable in the circumstances:

    • (d) that any person authorised to do so may execute the warrant:

    • (e) that the person executing the warrant may use any force that is reasonable in the circumstances to enter or break open or access any area within the place, vehicle, or other thing being searched, or the thing found:

    • (f) the address or description of the place, vehicle, or other thing that may be searched:

    • (g) a description of what may be seized:

    • (h) the period during which the warrant may be executed, being—

      • (i) a period specified by the issuing officer not exceeding 14 days from the date of issue; or

      • (ii) if the issuing officer is satisfied that a period of longer than 14 days is necessary for execution, a period specified by the issuing officer not exceeding 30 days from the date of issue:

    • (i) any conditions specified by the issuing officer under subsection (3)(b):

    • (j) if the warrant may be executed on more than 1 occasion, the number of times that the warrant may be executed:

    • (k) if the warrant is intended to authorise the remote access and search of things such as Internet data storage facilities that are not situated at a physical location that can be searched, the access information that identifies the thing to be searched remotely:

    • (l) an explanation of the availability of relevant privileges and an outline of how any of those privileges may be claimed:

    • (m) a statement that,—

      • (i) in the case of a search under a search warrant issued in relation to offences under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975, any person found in the place or vehicle to be searched may also be searched; and

      • (ii) in the case of any other search, any person found in the place or vehicle to be searched may be searched if there are reasonable grounds to believe that the item being searched for is on that person.

    (5) A person is not required, as a consequence of a condition imposed under subsection (3)(b)(ii), to give any information tending to incriminate the person.

104 Issuing officer may require search warrant report
  • (1) An issuing officer may impose a condition under section 103(3)(b) requiring the employer of any person to whom a search warrant is issued to provide that issuing officer with a search warrant report within a specified period.

    (2) A search warrant report must contain the following information:

    • (a) whether the search warrant was executed:

    • (b) whether the execution of the search warrant resulted in the seizure of evidential material, and, if so, whether that material was material—

      • (i) specified in the search warrant; or

      • (ii) seized under section 120; or

      • (iii) some of which was specified in the warrant and some of which was seized under section 120:

    • (c) whether any other powers exercised in conjunction with the execution of the warrant resulted in the seizure of evidential material:

    • (d) whether any criminal proceedings have been brought, or are under consideration, that relate to the evidential material seized.

105 Transmission of search warrant
  • If it is not possible or practicable for the person charged with executing the warrant to have it in his or her possession at the time of execution, one of the following documents (which is deemed for all legal purposes to constitute the warrant) may be executed:

    • (a) a facsimile or other electronic copy of a warrant issued by the issuing officer:

    • (b) a copy made by the person to whom the warrant is directed, at the direction of the issuing officer and endorsed to that effect.

106 When search warrant executed
  • A search warrant is executed when the person executing the warrant and any person assisting in the execution of the warrant—

    • (a) has seized all the items specified in the warrant; or

    • (b) leaves the place, vehicle, or other thing being searched and does not return within 4 hours.

107 When search warrant invalid
  • (1) A search warrant is invalid—

    • (a) if, having regard to the information contained in the application, the grounds or conditions for lawful issue of a warrant set out in section 6 or the relevant enactment set out in the Schedule were not satisfied at the time the search warrant was issued:

    • (b) if the warrant contains a defect, irregularity, omission, or want of form, that is likely to mislead anyone executing or affected by the warrant as to its purpose or scope.

    (2) If a warrant is invalid under this section, section 204 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 does not apply to that warrant.

108 Authorisation of issuing officers
  • (1) The Attorney-General may authorise any Justice of the Peace, Community Magistrate, Registrar, Deputy Registrar, or other person to act as an issuing officer for a term, not exceeding 3 years, specified in the notice of authorisation.

    (2) The Attorney-General may not authorise any Justice of the Peace, Community Magistrate, Registrar, Deputy Registrar, or other person to act as an issuing officer unless the Attorney-General is satisfied that the person has sufficient knowledge, skill, and experience to act as an issuing officer.

    (3) The Attorney-General may from time to time renew an authorisation granted under subsection (1) for a further term not exceeding 3 years specified in the notice of renewal.

Subpart 3Carrying out inspection and search powers

109 Application
  • For the purposes of this subpart, search power means—

    • (a) every search warrant issued under this Act or any provision listed in the Schedule; and

    • (b) every power conferred under this Act or any provision listed in the Schedule to enter and search (without warrant) any place, vehicle, or other thing.

110 Search powers
  • Every search power authorises the person exercising it—

    • (a) to enter and search the place, vehicle, or other thing that the person is authorised to enter and search, and any item or items found in that place or vehicle, at any time that is reasonable in the circumstances:

    • (b) to request any person to assist with the entry and search (including, without limitation, a member of a hapu or an iwi if the place to be entered is of cultural or spiritual significance to that hapu or iwi):

    • (c) to use any force that is reasonable for the purposes of the entry and search and any lawful seizure:

    • (d) to detain any person who is at the place or in the vehicle or other thing being searched, or who arrives there while the search is being undertaken, for a reasonable period (using reasonable force if necessary), to enable the person exercising the power to determine whether the person is connected with the object of the search:

    • (e) to seize any thing authorised to be seized:

    • (f) to bring and use in or on the place, vehicle, or other thing searched any equipment, to use any equipment found on the place, vehicle, or other thing, and to extract any electricity from the place, vehicle, or other thing to operate the equipment that it is reasonable to use in the circumstances, for the purposes of carrying out the entry and search:

    • (g) to bring and use in or on the place, vehicle, or other thing searched a dog (being a dog that is trained to undertake searching):

    • (h) to copy any document, or part of a document, that may lawfully be seized:

    • (i) to access and copy intangible material from computers and other data storage devices located at or accessible from the place, vehicle, or other thing searched (including copying by means of previewing, cloning, or other forensic methods either before or after removal for examination):

    • (j) to use any reasonable measures to—

      • (i) gain access to any computer or other data storage device that is at the place or in the vehicle or other thing to be searched, or that can be accessed from a computer or other data storage device that is at that place or in that vehicle or other thing; and

      • (ii) create a forensic copy of any material in such a computer or other data storage device:

    • (k) to take photographs and sound and video recordings of the place, vehicle, or other thing searched, and of any thing found in that place, vehicle, or other thing, if the person exercising the power has reasonable grounds to believe that the photographs or sound or video recordings may be relevant in any proceedings related to the entry and search.

111 Items of uncertain status may be seized
  • If a person exercising a search power is uncertain whether any item found may lawfully be seized, and it is not reasonably practicable to determine whether that item can be seized at the place or vehicle where the search takes place, the person exercising the search power may remove the item for the purpose of examination or processing to determine whether it may be lawfully seized.

112 Powers of persons called to assist
  • (1) Every person called on to assist a person exercising a search power is subject to the control of the person with overall responsibility for exercising that power.

    (2) Every person called on to assist a person exercising a search power may—

    • (a) enter the place, vehicle, or other thing to be searched:

    • (b) while under the direction of the person exercising the power, use reasonable force in respect of any property for the purposes of carrying out the entry and search and any lawful seizure:

    • (c) search areas within the place, vehicle, or other thing that the person exercising the power has determined may lawfully be searched:

    • (d) detain any person who is at the place or in the vehicle or other thing being searched, or who arrives there while the search is being undertaken (using reasonable force if necessary), to enable the person exercising the power to determine whether the person is connected with the object of the search:

    • (e) seize any thing that may lawfully be seized:

    • (f) take photographs and sound and video recordings of the place, vehicle, or other thing, and things found in the place, vehicle, or other thing, if the person exercising the power has determined that those things may be lawfully taken:

    • (g) bring into or onto the place, vehicle, or other thing and use any equipment, make use of any equipment found on the place or in the vehicle or other thing, or extract electricity from the place, vehicle, or other thing for the purposes of operating the equipment that the person exercising the power has determined may be lawfully used:

    • (h) access and copy intangible material from computers and other data storage devices located at or accessible from the place, vehicle, or other thing searched (including copying by means of previewing, cloning, or other forensic methods either before or after removal for examination):

    • (i) copy any document, or part of a document, that the person exercising the power has determined may be lawfully copied:

    • (j) use any reasonable measures to—

      • (i) gain access to any computer or other data storage device that is at the place or in the vehicle or other thing to be searched, or that can be accessed from a computer or other data storage device that is at that place or in that vehicle or other thing; and

      • (ii) create a forensic copy of any material in such a computer or other storage device.

    (3) If a member of the police is assisting another person exercising the search power, that member of the police may, without any direction or supervision by the person he or she is assisting, exercise any power ordinarily exercisable by that member.

    (4) The person exercising the search power must—

    • (a) accompany any assistant on the first occasion when the assistant enters the place, vehicle, or other thing to be searched; and

    • (b) provide such other supervision of any assistant as is reasonable in the circumstances.

    (5) Subsection (4) does not apply if the assistant is a member of the police.

113 Limitation on exercise of powers
  • The powers conferred by sections 110 to 112 are subject to—

    • (a) any conditions imposed under section 103(3)(b) by an issuing officer who issues a search warrant:

    • (b) subpart 4 of this Part (which relates to privilege and confidentiality).

Giving directions

114 Securing place, vehicle, or other thing to be searched
  • (1) The person carrying out a search may, in a manner and for a duration that is reasonable for the purposes of carrying out the search,—

    • (a) secure the place, vehicle, or other thing searched, any area within that place, vehicle, or other thing, or any thing found within that place, vehicle, or other thing:

    • (b) exclude any person from the place, vehicle, or other thing searched, or from any area within the place, vehicle, or other thing, or give any other reasonable direction to such a person, if the person carrying out the search has reasonable grounds to believe that the person will obstruct or hinder the exercise of the power.

    (2) A person who exercises any power under subsection (1) must on the request of any persons affected by the exercise of the power—

    • (a) identify himself or herself; and

    • (b) advise the person affected of the reason and authority for the exercise of the power.

Establishing search scene

115 Special powers where application for search warrant pending
  • (1) If an application for a search warrant is about to be made or has been made and has not yet been granted or refused by an issuing officer, an enforcement officer present at the place or vehicle that is or is to be the subject of the application may—

    • (a) enter and secure the place, vehicle, or other thing in respect of which authorisation to enter and search is being sought, and secure any item or items found at that place or in that vehicle or other thing, at any time that is reasonable in the circumstances:

    • (b) request any person to assist with the entry and securing of the place or vehicle or other thing or the securing of items in it (including, without limitation, a member of a hapu or an iwi if the place to be entered is of cultural or spiritual significance to that hapu or iwi).

    (2) The powers conferred by subsection (1) may be exercised until the first of the following occurs:

    • (a) the expiry of 6 hours from when the power is first exercised:

    • (b) the warrant is available for execution at that place or vehicle or in respect of that other thing:

    • (c) the application for a search warrant is refused.

    (3) A person who exercises any power under subsection (1) must, on the request of any person affected by the exercise of the power,—

    • (a) identify himself or herself; and

    • (b) advise the persons affected of the reason and authority for the exercise of the power.

Detention of person at search scene

116 Powers of detention incidental to powers to search places and vehicles
  • (1) If any member of the police or other person exercises a power to search a place or vehicle, that member of the police or other person may, for the purposes of determining whether there is any connection between a person at the place or in the vehicle and the object of the search, detain any person—

    • (a) who is at the place or in the vehicle at the commencement of the search; or

    • (b) who arrives at the place or stops at, or enters, or tries to enter, the vehicle while the search is being carried out.

    (2) A person may be detained under subsection (1) for any period that is reasonable, but not for longer than the duration of the search.

    (3) A detention of any person commences under subsection (1) when the member of the police or other person exercising the search power directs that person to remain at the place or in the vehicle and ends when that person is told by the member of the police or other person exercising the search power that he or she is free to leave the place or vehicle.

    (4) Reasonable force may be used for the purpose of effecting and continuing any detention under subsection (1).

    (5) This section does not limit the powers conferred by section 110(d) or 112(2)(d).

Powers of search incidental to powers of arrest

117 Powers of search incidental to power of arrest
  • (1) If any person who may exercise a power of arrest is searching a place or vehicle, he or she may search any person found at the place or in the vehicle, if the person conducting the search has reasonable grounds to believe that evidential material that is the object of the search is on that person.

    (2) If any person who may exercise a power of arrest is searching a place or vehicle he or she may search any person found at the place or in the vehicle, or who arrives at the place or stops at, or enters, or tries to enter the vehicle, if the person conducting the search—

    • (a) has reasonable grounds to suspect that the person is in possession of a dangerous item that poses a threat to safety; and

    • (b) believes that immediate action is needed to address that threat.

    (3) If any item referred to in subsection (2)(a) is seized, it must, unless possession of the item constitutes an offence, be returned to the person from whom it was taken either—

    • (a) once the search has been completed; or

    • (b) when the person who conducted the search is satisfied that there is no longer any threat to safety.

118 Powers of search when suspect pursued
  • (1) If any person who may exercise a power of arrest intends to conduct a search of a person or vehicle, but that person or vehicle leaves before the search is undertaken or completed, the person who intended to conduct the search may,—

    • (a) on apprehending the person or vehicle, search the person or vehicle; and

    • (b) enter private property for the purpose of apprehending the person or vehicle.

    (2) A person may not exercise the powers conferred by subsection (1)(a) or (b) unless—

    • (a) the person was freshly pursuing the person to be searched from the location of the intended search, when the person was apprehended; and

    • (b) the person intending to conduct the search has reasonable grounds to believe that relevant evidential material is still on the person who is to be searched, or in the vehicle.

Moving vehicle for safekeeping and other purposes

119 Moving vehicle for purpose of search, safekeeping, or road safety
  • An enforcement officer may move a vehicle to another place if he or she finds or stops the vehicle, and he or she —

    • (a) has lawful authority to search the vehicle, but it is impracticable to do so at that place; or

    • (b) has reasonable grounds to believe that it is necessary to move the vehicle for safekeeping or for road safety purposes.

Seizure of items in plain view

120 Seizure of evidential material in plain view
  • An enforcement officer who exercises a search power or who is lawfully in any place as part of his or her duties may seize any item or items that are evidential material and that he or she, or any person assisting him or her, finds in the course of carrying out the search or as a result of observations at that place, if the enforcement officer has reasonable grounds to believe that he or she could have seized the item or items under—

    • (a) any search warrant that could have been obtained by him or her under this Act or any other enactment; or

    • (b) any other search power exercisable by him or her under this Act or any other enactment.

Search of persons

121 Special rules about searching persons
  • (1) If a person exercises a power to search a person, the person exercising the power—

    • (a) must identify himself or herself either by name or unique identifier; and

    • (b) must advise the person to be searched of the authority and reason for the search, unless it is impracticable to do so in the circumstances; and

    • (c) may detain the person to enable the search to be carried out (whether at the place of initial detention or while the person is travelling to or is at any other place where the search is carried out), but only for as long as is necessary to achieve that purpose; and

    • (d) may use any force that is reasonable for the purposes of the search; and

    • (e) may in conducting the search use any equipment or aid to facilitate the search, if it is used in a way that—

      • (i) involves no or minimal contact; and

      • (ii) is reasonable in the circumstances; and

    • (f) may search any item that—

      • (i) the person is wearing or carrying; or

      • (ii) that is in the person's physical possession or immediate control.

    (2) If a person exercises a power to search a person, or searches a person with his or her consent, the person exercising the power must ensure that an inventory of any items seized as a result of the search is prepared promptly and a copy is given to the person searched.

    (3) Subsection (2) does not apply in respect of a search conducted under section 20.

    (4) Nothing in subsection (1)(e) permits a person carrying out a rub-down search under sections 85 to 87 (rub-down search of arrested or detained person) to carry out a more intrusive search than is described in those sections.

122 Guidelines and rules about use of strip searching
  • (1) The chief executive of a law enforcement agency that employs persons who may exercise a power, under an enactment, to search the person must issue guidelines to those employees concerning the circumstances (if any) under which a strip search may be conducted by any of those employees.

    (2) A search of the person is not unlawful by reason only of failure by the person conducting the search to comply with a guideline issued under subsection (1).

    (3) A strip search may be carried out only by a person of the same sex as the person to be searched, and no strip search may be carried out in view of any person who is not of the same sex as the person to be searched.

    (4) In this section strip search means a search where the person conducting the search may require the person being searched to remove, raise, lower, all or any of the latter person's clothing.

Search warrants to enter and search vehicles

123 Search warrants to enter and search vehicles
  • If a search warrant is issued authorising the entry and search of a vehicle, the person executing the warrant may enter any place where the person has reasonable grounds to believe that the vehicle is, for the purpose of locating it and searching it.

Provision of particulars and other information

124 Power to require particulars
  • If a person exercises a power to stop or search a vehicle, the person exercising the power may require—

    • (a) any or all persons in the vehicle to supply their name, address, date of birth, and other contact details:

    • (b) the vehicle to remain stopped for as long as is reasonably necessary to undertake the search.

125 Duty to provide information
  • If a person exercises a power to stop a vehicle, that person must, immediately after stopping the vehicle,—

    • (a) identify himself or herself to the driver of the vehicle, either by name or unique identifier; and

    • (b) inform the driver of the person's authority to stop the vehicle; and

    • (c) if not in uniform, produce evidence of his or her identity, if the driver requests proof of identity.

Computer searches

126 Duty of persons with knowledge of computer or computer network or other data storage devices to assist access
  • (1) A person exercising a search power at any place or vehicle or in respect of any other thing may require a specified person to provide access information and other information or assistance that is reasonable and necessary to allow the person exercising the search power to access data held in, or accessible from,—

    • (a) a computer that is at the place or in the vehicle or other thing being searched:

    • (b) any other data storage device that is at the place or in the vehicle or other thing being searched.

    (2) In this section,—

    access information includes access codes, passwords, and encryption keys, and any related information that enables access to a computer or other data storage device

    specified person is a person who—

    • (a) is the owner or lessee of the computer or other data storage device, or is in possession or control of the computer or other data storage device, an employee of any of the above, or any service provider who provides service to the above and holds access information; and

    • (b) has relevant knowledge of—

      • (i) the computer or a computer network of which the computer or other data storage device forms a part; or

      • (ii) measures applied to protect data held in, or accessible from, the computer or other data storage device.

    (3) A specified person may not be required under subsection (1) to give any information tending to incriminate the person.

    (4) Subsection (3) does not prevent a person exercising a search power from requiring a specified person to provide information that—

    • (a) is reasonable and necessary to allow the person exercising the search power to access data held in, or accessible from, a computer or other data storage device that—

      • (i) is at the premises or in the place, vehicle, or other thing to be searched; and

      • (ii) contains or may contain information tending to incriminate the specified person; but

    • (b) does not itself tend to incriminate the specified person.

    (5) Subsection (3) does not prevent a person exercising a search power from requiring a specified person to provide assistance that is reasonable and necessary to allow the person exercising the search power to access data held in, or accessible from, a computer or other data storage device that—

    • (a) is at the premises or in the place, vehicle, or other thing concerned; and

    • (b) contains or may contain information tending to incriminate the specified person.

Identification and notice

127 Identification and notice requirements for person exercising search power
  • (1) A person exercising a search power must,—

    • (a) before initial entry into or onto the place or vehicle or other thing to be searched,—

      • (i) announce his or her intention to enter and search the place, vehicle, or other thing under a statutory power:

      • (ii) identify himself or herself; and

    • (b) before or on initial entry into or onto the place or vehicle, or other thing to be searched,—

      • (i) give the occupier (if present) of the place or the person in charge of the vehicle or other thing a copy of the search warrant or advice about the enactment (the authority) that authorises him or her to conduct the entry and search; and

      • (ii) produce to the occupier of the place or the person in charge of the vehicle or other thing evidence of his or her identity (which may include details of a unique identifier instead of a name).

    (2) The person exercising the search is not required to comply with subsection (1)(a) if he or she has reasonable grounds to believe that—

    • (a) no person is lawfully present in or on the place, vehicle, or other thing to be searched; or

    • (b) compliance with subsection (1)(a) would—

      • (i) endanger the safety of any person; or

      • (ii) prejudice the successful exercise of the entry and search power; or

      • (iii) prejudice ongoing investigations.

    (3) The person exercising the search power may use reasonable force in order to effect entry into or onto the place, vehicle, or other thing if—

    • (a) subsection (2) applies; or

    • (b) following a request, the person present refuses entry or does not allow entry within a reasonable time.

    (4) If the occupier of a place is not present at any time during the search, or no person is in charge of the vehicle or other thing during the search, the person carrying out the search must,—

    • (a) on completion of the search, leave a copy of the authority referred to in subsection (1)(b)(i) and the notice referred to in subsection (5) in a prominent position at the place, or in or on the vehicle, or other thing; or

    • (b) if this is not reasonably practicable, provide the copy of the authority referred to in subsection (1)(b)(i) and the notice referred to in subsection (5) to the occupier of the place or the owner of the vehicle no later than 7 days after the exercise of the power.

    (5) The notice required by subsection (4) is a written notice containing the following particulars:

    • (a) the date and time of the commencement and completion of the search:

    • (b) the name or unique identifier of the person who had overall responsibility for that search:

    • (c) the address of the office to which enquiries should be made:

    • (d) if nothing is seized, the fact that nothing was seized:

    • (e) if anything was seized, the fact that seizure occurred and (if an inventory is not provided at the same time under sections 128 to 130) that an inventory of the things seized will be provided to the occupier of the place or person in charge of the vehicle or other thing no later than 7 days after the seizure.

    (6) For the purposes of this section and sections 128 to 130,—

    • (a) the following persons may not be treated as the occupier of the place or the person in charge of a vehicle or other thing:

      • (i) any person who is under 14 years of age (unless section 94(2) applies to that person):

      • (ii) any person whom the person executing the warrant has reasonable grounds to believe is not the occupier of the place or person in charge of the vehicle or other thing:

    • (b) every reference to a copy of the authority referred to in subsection (1)(b)(i) means, in a case where a search is undertaken without a search warrant, written advice about the enactment that authorises the search.

    (7) Subsections (4) and (5) are subject to sections 129 and 130.

128 Inventory of items seized
  • (1) The person who carries out a search must, at the time he or she seizes any thing, or as soon as practicable after the seizure of any thing, and in any case not later than 7 days after that seizure, provide to the occupier of the place, or the person in charge of the vehicle or other thing, from where the seizure took place, and to every other person whom the person who carried out the search has reason to believe is the owner of the thing that was seized,—

    • (a) written notice specifying what was seized; and

    • (b) a copy of the authority referred to in section 127(1)(b)(i).

    (2) A written notice referred to in subsection (1)(a)

    • (a) must contain information about the extent to which a person from whom a thing was seized or the owner of the thing has a right to apply—

      • (i) to have access to the thing; or

      • (ii) to have access to any document relating to the application for a search warrant or the exercise of any other search power that led to the seizure; and

    • (b) must contain information about the right to bring a claim that any privileged or confidential information has been seized; but

    • (c) need not be provided to the occupier of the place or person in charge of the vehicle or other thing from which the seizure took place, if the person who carries out the search is satisfied that none of the items seized are owned by that person.

    (3) If the occupier or person in charge of the vehicle or other thing is not present at the time of seizure, a written notice referred to in subsection (1)(a) and a copy of the authority referred to in section 127(1)(b)(i) may be provided to that person by leaving the notice in a prominent position at the place, or in or on the vehicle, or other thing.

    (4) Subsection (1) is subject to subsections (2) and (3).

    (5) This section is subject to sections 129 and 130.

129 Compliance with certain provisions may be deferred in certain circumstances
  • (1) A person exercising a search power may apply to a District Court Judge for a postponement of the obligation to comply with section 127(4) or (5) or 128 on the grounds that compliance would—

    • (a) endanger the safety of any person; or

    • (b) prejudice ongoing investigations.

    (2) An application may be made under subsection (1),—

    • (a) in the case of an entry and search power that is a search warrant, at the time of the initial application or until the expiry of 7 days after the warrant is finally executed; and

    • (b) in the case of any other entry and search power, until the expiry of 7 days after the search power is exercised.

    (3) On an application under subsection (1), the District Court Judge may postpone for a specified period not exceeding 12 months the obligation to comply with section 127(4) or (5) or 128, if the Judge is satisfied there are reasonable grounds for believing that compliance would—

    • (a) endanger the safety of any person; or

    • (b) prejudice ongoing investigations.

130 Further postponement of, or dispensation from, obligation to comply with certain provisions
  • (1) A person who has obtained an order under section 129(3) may, before the expiry of that order, apply to a District Court Judge for a further postponement of, or dispensation from, the obligation to comply with section 127(4) or (5) or 128 on the grounds that compliance would—

    • (a) endanger the safety of any person; or

    • (b) prejudice ongoing investigations.

    (2) An application for a further postponement may only be made on 1 occasion.

    (3) On an application under subsection (1), the District Court Judge may postpone for a further specified period not exceeding 12 months, or order a permanent dispensation from, the obligation to comply with section 127(4) or (5) or 128 if the Judge is satisfied that compliance would—

    • (a) endanger the safety of any person; or

    • (b) prejudice ongoing investigations.

    (4) A District Court Judge may not grant, under subsection (3), any postponement of, or dispensation from, an obligation in respect of any thing that has been seized, unless the thing seized is—

    • (a) a copy or clone of any information taken or made; or

    • (b) a thing the possession of which by the person from whom it was seized is unlawful under New Zealand law (for example, a controlled drug that is found in the possession of a member of the public in circumstances in which possession by the person of the controlled drug is an offence against the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975).

Subpart 4Privilege and confidentiality

General

131 Recognition of privilege
  • (1) The following privileges are recognised for the purposes of this subpart:

    • (a) legal professional privilege, to the extent that (under section 53(5) of the Evidence Act 2006) it forms part of the general law:

    • (b) privilege for communication with legal advisers (as described in section 54 of the Evidence Act 2006):

    • (c) privilege for preparatory material to proceedings (as described in section 56 of the Evidence Act 2006):

    • (d) privilege for settlement negotiations or mediation (as described in section 57 of the Evidence Act 2006):

    • (e) privilege for communication with ministers of religion (as described in section 58 of the Evidence Act 2006):

    • (f) privilege in criminal proceedings for information obtained by medical practitioners and clinical psychologists (as described in section 59 of the Evidence Act 2006):

    • (g) to the extent provided in section 134, and only to that extent, any privilege against self-incrimination (as described in section 60 of the Evidence Act 2006):

    • (h) privilege for informers (as described in section 64 of the Evidence Act 2006):

    • (i) the rights conferred on a journalist under section 68 of the Evidence Act 2006 to protect certain sources.

    (2) For the purposes of this subpart, no privilege applies in respect of any communication or information if made or received, or compiled or prepared,—

    • (a) for a dishonest purpose; or

    • (b) to enable or aid any person to commit or plan to commit what the person claiming the privilege knew, or ought reasonably to have known, to be an offence.

132 Lawyers trust accounts
  • (1) Subsection (2) applies to documents that are books of account or accounting records kept—

    • (a) by a solicitor in relation to any trust account money that is subject to section 112 of the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006; or

    • (b) by a nominee company that—

      • (i) is subject to practice rules made by the Council of the New Zealand Law Society pursuant to section 96 of the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006; and

      • (ii) is operated by a barrister and solicitor or an incorporated law firm as a nominee in respect of securities and documents of title held for clients.

    (2) The application by section 131 of this Act of section 54 of the Evidence Act 2006 (which relates to the privilege for communications with legal advisers) does not prevent, limit, or affect—

    • (a) the making of a production order, issuing of a search warrant, or exercise of any other search power in respect of a document to which this subsection applies; or

    • (b) the obligation to comply with that production order, search warrant, or other search power in respect of a document to which this subsection applies; or

    • (c) the admissibility, in a criminal proceeding for an offence described in the production order or search warrant or for an offence in respect of which any other search power was exercised, of any evidence that relates to the contents of a document obtained under the production order or search warrant, or as the result of the exercise of any other search power.

Examination orders and production orders

133 Privilege against self-incrimination
  • (1) An examination order or a production order does not affect the privilege against self-incrimination that an individual may have under section 60 of the Evidence Act 2006.

    (2) Any assertion of a privilege against self-incrimination must be based on section 60 of the Evidence Act 2006.

    (3) If any individual refuses to produce any information or document or to answer any question on the ground that it is a privileged communication under section 60 of the Evidence Act 2006, the Commissioner or other enforcement officer concerned may apply to a District Court Judge for an order determining whether or not the claim of privilege is valid.

    (4) For the purposes of determining any application referred to in subsection (3), the individual must offer sufficient evidence to enable the District Court Judge to assess whether self-incrimination is reasonably likely if the individual produced the information or the document or answered the question.

    (5) Section 63 of the Evidence Act 2006 does not apply to an examination order or to a production order.

134 Other privileges
  • (1) If a person against whom an examination order or production order is made could, in a criminal proceeding, assert a privilege recognised for the purposes of this subpart, the person is taken to have the same privilege in respect of either order.

    (2) If any person refuses to disclose any information on the ground that it is privileged under this section, the Commissioner or other enforcement officer concerned may apply to a District Court Judge for an order determining whether or not the claim of privilege is valid.

    (3) For the purpose of determining any application, the District Court Judge may require the information or document to be produced to him or her.

    (4) A District Court Judge may, on the application of the Commissioner or other enforcement officer, disallow a privilege claim under this section if the Judge is satisfied that the claim to privilege would, under section 67(1) of the Evidence Act 2006, be disallowed in a proceeding.

Surveillance

135 Effect of privilege on surveillance conducted under this Act
  • (1) A person who has a privilege recognised by this subpart has the right—

    • (a) to prevent, to the extent that it is reasonably practicable to do so, the surveillance under this Act of any communication or information to which the privilege would apply if it were sought to be disclosed in a proceeding:

    • (b) to require the destruction of any record of any such communication or information, to the extent that this can be achieved without destruction of any record of any other communication or information.

    (2) A person who is undertaking surveillance authorised by this Act (whether under a surveillance device warrant or otherwise) must—

    • (a) take all reasonable steps to prevent the interception of any communication or information to which a privilege recognised by this subpart would apply if the communication or information were sought to be disclosed in a proceeding:

    • (b) destroy any record of a communication or information made as a consequence of the surveillance to which a privilege recognised by this subpart would apply if the communication or information were sought to be disclosed in a proceeding, unless that is impossible or impracticable without destroying a record of information to which such a privilege does not apply.

    (3) A person undertaking surveillance under this Act who is uncertain about whether this section applies to any information or communication or record of a communication or information may apply to a District Court Judge for an order determining whether—

    • (a) the communication or information can be the subject of surveillance; and

    • (b) any record of such communication or information is required to be destroyed under this section.

    (4) For the purposes of determining any application the District Court Judge may require the record of the information or communication to be produced to him or her.

    (5) If evidence of any communication or information recorded as a consequence of surveillance under this Act is evidence to which a privilege recognised under this subpart applies, that evidence is not admissible in any proceedings except—

    • (a) with the consent of the person entitled to waive that privilege; and

    • (b) if the court agrees to admit it.

Search warrants and other search powers

136 Effect of privilege on search warrants and search powers
  • A person who has a privilege recognised by this subpart has the right, in accordance with sections 137 to 142,—

    • (a) to prevent the search under this Act of any communication or information to which the privilege would apply if it were sought to be disclosed in a proceeding:

    • (b) to require the return of any such communication or information to the person if it is seized or secured by a person exercising a search power pending determination of the claim to privilege.

137 Search warrants that extend to lawyers' premises or material held by lawyers
  • (1) This section applies to the execution of a search warrant that authorises the search of materials held by a lawyer relating to a client.

    (2) If this section applies, the search warrant may not be executed unless—

    • (a) the lawyer is present; or

    • (b) a representative of the lawyer is present.

    (3) If the person who is to execute the search warrant is unable to contact the lawyer or his or her representative, that person must instead contact the New Zealand Law Society and request that a person be appointed by the Society to represent the interests of the clients of the lawyer in relation to the search.

    (4) Before executing the search warrant, the person who is to execute it must give the lawyer or his or her representative, or any person appointed by the New Zealand Law Society under subsection (3),—

    • (a) the opportunity to claim privilege on behalf of the lawyer's client; or

    • (b) the opportunity to make an interim claim of privilege if instructions have not been obtained from the client.

138 Search warrant extending to certain other privileged materials
  • (1) This section applies to the execution of a search warrant that authorises the search of professional material held by a minister of religion, medical practitioner, or clinical psychologist.

    (2) If this section applies, the search warrant may not be executed unless—

    • (a) the minister of religion, medical practitioner, or clinical psychologist is present; or

    • (b) a representative of that person is present.

    (3) If the person who is to execute the search warrant is unable to contact the minister of religion, medical practitioner, or clinical psychologist, or his or her representative, that person must instead contact the church or professional body to whom the minister, medical practitioner, or clinical psychologist belongs and request the church or body to appoint a person to represent the interests of the parishioners, patients, or clients of the minister, medical practitioner or clinical psychologist, in relation to the search.

    (4) Before executing the search warrant, the person executing it must give the minister of religion, medical practitioner or clinical psychologist, or his or her personal representative, or the person appointed by the church or professional body under subsection (3),—

    • (a) the opportunity to claim privilege on behalf of parishioners, patients, or clients of the minister of religion, medical practitioner, or clinical psychologist; or

    • (b) the opportunity to make an interim claim of privilege if the minister, medical practitioner or clinical psychologist, or his or her representative or person appointed under subsection (3) is unable to immediately contact the parishioner, patient, or client.

139 Searches otherwise affecting privileged materials
  • (1) This section applies if—

    • (a) a person executes a search warrant; or

    • (b) a person exercising a search power has reasonable grounds to believe that any thing discovered in the search may be the subject of a privilege recognised by this subpart.

    (2) If this section applies, the person responsible for executing the search warrant or other person exercising the search power must—

    • (a) provide any person who he or she believes may be able to claim a privilege recognised by this subpart a reasonable opportunity to claim it; and

    • (b) if the person executing the search warrant or exercising the other search power is unable to identify or contact a person who may be able to claim a privilege, or that person's lawyer, within a reasonable period, the person executing the search warrant or exercising the other search power may—

      • (i) apply to the District Court for a determination as to the status of the thing; and

      • (ii) do any thing necessary to enable that court to make that determination.

140 Interim steps pending resolution of privilege claim
  • If a person executing a search warrant or exercising a search power is prohibited under section 136, 137, 138, or 139 from searching any thing, the person—

    • (a) may—

      • (i) secure the thing; and

      • (ii) if the thing is intangible (for example, computer data), secure the thing by making a forensic copy; and

      • (iii) deliver the thing, or a copy of it, to the District Court, to enable the determination of a claim to privilege; and

    • (b) must supply the lawyer or other person who may or does claim privilege with a copy of, or access to, the secured thing; and

    • (c) must not search the thing secured, unless no claim of privilege is made, or a claim of privilege is withdrawn, or the search is in accordance with the directions of the court determining the claim of privilege.

141 Claims for privilege for things sought to be seized or seized
  • Any person who wishes to claim privilege in respect of any thing sought to be seized or seized by a person executing a search warrant or exercising a search power—

    • (a) must provide the person responsible for executing the search warrant or exercising the other search power with a particularised list of the things in respect of which the privilege is claimed, as soon as practicable after being provided with the opportunity to claim privilege or being advised that a search is to be, or is being, or has been conducted, as the case requires:

    • (b) if the thing or things in respect of which the privilege is claimed cannot be adequately particularised in accordance with paragraph (a), may apply to a District Court for directions or relief (with a copy of the thing provided under section 140(b)).

Admission of evidence generally

142 Admission of evidence
  • (1) If a District Court upholds a claim to privilege under section 133, 134, 135, 139, 140, or 141 in respect of any communication or information, the communication or information to which the privilege applies is not admissible in any proceedings arising from, or related to, the execution of the search warrant or exercise of the other search power or surveillance power or the carrying out of the examination order or production order, as the case requires.

    (2) Subject to subsection (1), this subpart does not limit or affect the admissibility of any evidence, or the discretion of any court to admit or refuse to admit any evidence, in any proceedings.

Subpart 5Procedures applying to seized or produced materials

143 Disposal of things seized or produced
  • (1) If any thing is produced under a production order or is seized under a search warrant or under a search power conferred by this Act or an enactment listed in the Schedule, it must be dealt with in accordance with this subpart.

    (2) However, this subpart is subject to subpart 4 (which relates to privilege and confidentiality) and to any other enactment.

144 Certain things must be returned
  • (1) A thing seized or produced must, if it is not required for investigative or evidential purposes, be—

    • (a) returned to its owner or to the person entitled to possession; or

    • (b) made the subject of an application under section 148; or

    • (c) disposed of under section 154 or 155(1); or

    • (d) destroyed if it is perishable and has become rotten or has otherwise deteriorated.

    (2) Subsection (1) does not affect the rights of retention conferred by section 155(2) or 156(1).

145 Custody of things seized or produced
  • (1) The seized or produced thing may, if it is required for investigative or evidential purposes, be held in the custody of the person who exercised the search power or that person's employer or another person acting on behalf of that person (except while it is being used in evidence or is in the custody of any court) until the first of the following occurs:

    • (a) a decision is made not to bring proceedings for an offence in respect of which the thing was seized or produced:

    • (b) the thing is forfeited to the Crown or any other person under any enactment:

    • (c) the thing is released under section 152 or 153:

    • (d) if proceedings for an offence have not been commenced before the date that is 6 months after the thing was seized or produced and a request has been made for the return of the thing, that date or the expiration of a later time ordered by a court under section 147:

    • (e) in any case where proceedings are brought,—

      • (i) the withdrawal or dismissal of the proceedings; or

      • (ii) subject to sections 150 and 153, the completion of the proceedings:

    • (f) the seized or produced thing is disposed of under section 154.

    (2) Once the relevant event stated in subsection (1)(a) to (e) occurs, the person in whose custody the property is must, subject to section 147, immediately release the thing in his or her custody,—

    • (a) in the case of a subsection (1)(a), (d), or (e) event, to the owner or to a person entitled to possession; or

    • (b) in the case of any other event, in the manner required by this Act.

    (3) However, if the thing is seized or produced in relation to more than 1 alleged offence, the person in whose custody the property is need not release the property until the first of the events described in subsection (1) has occurred in relation to each and every alleged offence.

    (4) This section is subject to section 147.

146 Copies of things seized or produced
  • If a photograph or a copy of a seized or produced thing will be adequate for investigative or evidential purposes, the person who exercised the search power, or that person's employer or another person acting on behalf of that person may, at his or her discretion, return the thing to the owner or to a person entitled to possession.

147 Extension of time for holding thing seized or produced
  • (1) If any person who seizes any thing, or to whom any thing is produced, or any other enforcement officer to whom the thing is transferred, wishes to hold it for a period exceeding 6 months in circumstances where no proceedings for an offence in respect of which the thing is relevant have yet been brought and a request has been made for the return of the thing, the person may apply to the District Court for an extension of the time during which the thing may be held.

    (2) On an application under subsection (1) the District Court may order—

    • (a) an extension of time be granted to a specified date, to enable a determination to be made whether proceedings should be brought; or

    • (b) decline to order an extension of time.

148 Disputed ownership of thing seized or produced
  • (1) If a thing seized or produced is not to be produced in evidence but there is a dispute about its ownership, or it is perishable, or for any reason the person in whose custody it is is uncertain as to whom the thing should be returned (for example, because it is unclaimed), the person in whose custody the thing is may apply to the District Court for directions as to the ownership or holding of the property.

    (2) On an application under subsection (1), the District Court may—

    • (a) order that the thing be destroyed or, if any other enactment so authorises, forfeited to the Crown:

    • (b) order that the thing be delivered to the person appearing to the court to be its owner entitled to possession of it:

    • (c) if the owner or person entitled to possession cannot be found, make any order with respect to its possession or sale the court thinks fit.

    (3) An application under this section must be made by originating application to a District Court in its civil jurisdiction.

    (4) If, after the making of an order under subsection (2) in relation to any property, an action is commenced against a police employee or other enforcement officer or the Crown or any law enforcement agency for the recovery of the thing or its value, the order and the delivery of the thing in accordance with the order may be given and must be received in evidence in bar of the action.

    (5) However, no such order or delivery affects the right of any persons entitled by law to possession of the thing to recover the thing from any person or body (other than a person or body referred to in subsection (4)).

149 Seized or produced property forfeit to Crown if ownership not established
  • (1) If the owner or person entitled to possession of a thing seized or produced is not established within 2 years after the date on which the thing was seized or produced and it has not been disposed of or sold by order of the court within that period, the property is forfeit to the Crown.

    (2) For the purpose of trying to establish ownership of any thing to which this section applies, the person who has custody of the thing must advise the following people of the effect of this section:

    • (a) any person who produced the thing or from whom the thing was seized:

    • (b) the occupier or owner of the place or vehicle where the thing was before it was produced or seized:

    • (c) any other person who, in the opinion of the person in whose custody the thing is, may be affected by the forfeiture of the thing.

Rights of owners and others in relation to things seized or produced

150 Application for release of or access to things seized or produced
  • (1) The persons described in subsection (2) may apply, by written notice, to the person in whose custody the seized or produced thing is for the release of or access to it at any time before proceedings are brought for an alleged offence in respect of which the thing was seized or produced.

    (2) The persons are as follows:

    • (a) the person who produced the thing or from whom the thing was seized:

    • (b) the owner or person entitled to possession of the seized or produced thing:

    • (c) any person with a legal or equitable interest in the seized or produced thing.

    (3) The person in whose custody the seized or produced thing is may release the thing to the applicant or provide reasonable access to it.

    (4) A person who receives an application for release of a thing, or access to it, may refuse that application on the ground that release of the thing or, as the case requires, access to it, is likely to prejudice the maintenance of the law.

    (5) A release or provision of access to a thing may be—

    • (a) unconditional; or

    • (b) under bond for a sum (with or without sureties), and on conditions, acceptable to the person in whose custody the thing was.

    (6) If any person refuses an application under subsection (1), he or she must inform the applicant of the decision in writing.

151 Failure to comply with bond or conditions
  • (1) If a person to whom a seized or produced thing is released or who is given access to it under section 150 fails to comply with any bond, surety, or condition imposed under subsection (5)(b) of that section,—

    • (a) the thing may be seized again, or required to be produced, or the ability to access the thing ended at the direction of the person who released it or provided access to it; and

    • (b) the person who released it or provided access to it may apply to the District Court for an order for estreat of the bond.

    (2) If any person applies for an order for estreat of the bond, the Registrar of the District Court must—

    • (a) fix a time and place for the hearing of the application; and

    • (b) not less than 7 days before the time fixed, cause to be served on every person bound by the bond a notice of the time and place for the hearing.

    (3) If the Court is satisfied that a condition of the bond has not been complied with, the Court may make an order to estreat the bond—

    • (a) in the amount that it thinks fit; and

    • (b) to any person bound by the bond on whom notice is proved to have been served under subsection (2).

    (4) An amount payable under subsection (3) is recoverable as if it were a fine.

152 Application to District Court for access to thing seized or produced
  • (1) A person described in section 150(2) may apply to the District Court for access to any thing seized by a person exercising a search power or produced to any person under a production order if the person has made an application under section 150 and it—

    • (a) has been refused; or

    • (b) has been granted, but subject to conditions that the applicant does not accept.

    (2) The District Court may either—

    • (a) grant the application; or

    • (b) refuse it on the ground that allowing the person to have access to the thing or varying or cancelling the conditions concerned is likely to prejudice the maintenance of the law.

    (3) The District Court may require sureties and impose conditions if it grants an application under subsection (2), and sections 150 and 151 apply with any necessary modifications.

153 Application to District Court for release of thing seized or produced
  • (1) A person described in section 150(2) may apply to the District Court for the release of any thing seized by a person exercising a search power or produced to a person under a production order.

    (2) The court may release the thing to the applicant if it is satisfied that it would be contrary to the interests of justice for the item to be retained in custody, having regard to—

    • (a) the gravity of the alleged offence:

    • (b) any loss or damage to the applicant that is caused or likely to be caused by not returning the thing:

    • (c) the likely evidential value of the thing, having regard to any other evidence held by the law enforcement agency that employed or engaged the person who seized the thing or to whom the thing was produced:

    • (d) whether the evidential value of the thing can be adequately preserved by means other than by keeping it.

    (3) A court may require sureties and impose conditions on a release under subsection (2), and sections 150 and 151 apply with any necessary modifications.

    (4) This section is subject to any enactment that requires an amount of any kind to be paid before any seized thing may be returned.

154 Disposal of unlawful items
  • (1) Subsection (2) applies if a thing is seized or produced, the possession of which by the person from whom it was seized is unlawful under New Zealand law (for example, a controlled drug that is found in the possession of a member of the public in circumstances in which possession by the person of the controlled drug is an offence against the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975), and—

    • (a) there is no mechanism provided for disposing of the thing or it has not been disposed of under any other enactment; and

    • (b) no order has been made by a court as to its disposal.

    (2) If this subsection applies, the person who seized the thing or to whom the thing was produced may destroy it if—

    • (a) notice is given to the person from whom the thing was seized or who was required to produce the thing, and that person either—

      • (i) consents to its destruction; or

      • (ii) does not within 30 working days object to its destruction; or

    • (b) the person to whom notice would otherwise be given under paragraph (a), cannot be located after reasonable enquiries have been made; or

    • (c) in a case where a person objects to the destruction of the thing within 30 working days of receiving a notice under paragraph (a) and any person applies to a court to determine the status of the thing, the court is satisfied that the possession of the thing by the person from whom it was seized or who was required to produce it is unlawful under New Zealand law.

155 Disposal of forensic copies
  • (1) A person who makes a forensic copy of any data held in a computer or other data storage device must, if he or she determines that the data does not contain any evidential material, ensure that the forensic copy and any copies made from that copy are deleted, erased, or otherwise destroyed in a way that prevents retrieval of the copy or copies by any method.

    (2) However, if an examination of the data contains a mixture of data that is evidential material and data that is not evidential material,—

    • (a) the forensic copy of the data and any copies made of that copy may be retained in their entirety; and

    • (b) that forensic copy and any copies made of that copy may continue to be searched, if such a search was authorised by the search power under which the data was seized and copied.

156 Other copies and generated material may be retained
  • (1) Any thing made or generated by a person exercising a search or surveillance power (for example, photographs or audio or video recordings or copies of things) may be retained as part of the permanent records of the employer of the person who exercises the search or surveillance power.

    (2) Subsection (1) is subject to section 131 and any other enactment or rule of law.

Subpart 6Immunities

157 Immunities of issuing officer
  • An issuing officer who is not a Judge has the same immunities as a District Court Judge.

158 Immunities in relation to the obtaining or execution of orders and warrants
  • Every person is immune from civil or criminal liability—

    • (a) for any act done in good faith in order to obtain an examination order, a production order, a search warrant, a surveillance device warrant, a residual warrant, or other order referred to in this Act:

    • (b) for any act done in good faith in relation to the execution of an examination order, a production order, a search warrant, a surveillance device warrant, a residual warrant, or other order referred to in this Act, if the execution is carried out in a reasonable manner.

159 Other immunities in relation to the exercise of entry, search, or surveillance powers
  • (1) Every person is immune from civil and criminal liability for any act done in good faith in order to exercise an entry power, search power, or surveillance power if—

    • (a) the power is exercised by that person in a reasonable manner; and

    • (b) the person believes on reasonable grounds that the preconditions for the exercise of that power have been satisfied.

    (2) Every person is immune from civil and criminal liability for any act done in good faith and in a reasonable manner in order to assist a person to exercise an entry power, a search power, or a surveillance power, or in order to examine or analyse any thing that is seized.

    (3) In any civil proceeding in which a person asserts that he or she has an immunity under this section, the onus is on that person to prove those facts necessary to establish the basis of the claim.

160 Immunity of the Crown
  • If any person is immune from civil liability under any of sections 157 to 159 in respect of anything done or omitted to be done, the Crown is also immune from civil liability in tort in respect of that person's conduct.

161 Relationship between sections 157 to 160 and other enactments
  • If there is any inconsistency between any of sections 157 to 160 and the provisions of any other enactment conferring, regulating, or limiting a privilege or immunity, sections 157 to 160 prevail.

Subpart 7Reporting

162 Reporting of exercise of powers within law enforcement agency
  • (1) Any person who exercises a warrantless entry power, search power, or surveillance power conferred by this Act or by an enactment listed in the Schedule must provide a written report on the exercise of that power to an employee designated to receive reports of that kind by the chief executive of the law enforcement agency concerned, as soon as is practicable, after the exercise of the power.

    (2) A report referred to in subsection (1) must—

    • (a) contain a short summary of the circumstances surrounding the exercise of the power, and the reason or reasons why the power needed to be exercised:

    • (b) state whether any evidential material was seized or obtained as a result of the exercise of the power:

    • (c) state whether any criminal proceedings have been brought or are being considered as a consequence of the seizure of that evidential material.

    (3) This section does not require the provision of any report in respect of—

    • (a) a rub-down search of a person that is undertaken in conjunction with their arrest:

    • (b) any search of a person in lawful custody carried out under section 11 or under the Corrections Act 2004:

    • (c) the exercise of any power of entry that does not also confer a power of search:

    • (d) a search undertaken by consent.

163 Annual reporting of search and surveillance powers
  • (1) The chief executive of a law enforcement agency that employs or engages persons who may exercise an entry power, search power, or surveillance power conferred by this Act or by an enactment listed in the Schedule must include in every annual report prepared by the chief executive for the purposes of section 39 of the Public Finance Act 1989 or any other relevant enactment requiring an annual report to Parliament—

    • (a) the number of occasions on which entry or search powers were exercised without a warrant in the period covered by the report:

    • (b) the number of occasions on which warrantless surveillance powers were exercised in the period covered by the report that involved the use of a surveillance device:

    • (c) in respect of each kind of surveillance device used in the period covered by the report, the numbers of that kind of device used—

      • (i) for a period of 6 hours or less:

      • (ii) for a period of more than 6 hours but no more than 12 hours:

      • (iii) for a period of more than 12 hours but no more than 24 hours:

      • (iv) for a period of more than 24 hours but no more than 48 hours:

    • (d) the number of criminal proceedings commenced in respect of which evidential material relevant to those proceedings was obtained directly or indirectly from the exercise of a warrantless search or surveillance power in the period covered by the report, and the number of such proceedings resulting in a conviction:

    • (e) the number of occasions on which warrantless search or surveillance powers were exercised in the period covered by the report that did not lead to the bringing of criminal proceedings within 90 days of the exercise of the power:

    • (f) the matters set out in section 164 in relation to surveillance device warrants and residual warrants.

    (2) This section does not require a chief executive to include in any annual report information about—

    • (a) a rub-down search of a person that is undertaken in conjunction with their arrest:

    • (b) any search of a person in lawful custody undertaken under section 11 or under the Corrections Act 2004:

    • (c) the exercise of any power of entry that does not also confer a power of search:

    • (d) a search undertaken by consent:

    • (e) any prescribed search or surveillance, or search or surveillance of a prescribed kind, in any prescribed area or an area of a prescribed kind.

    (3) In this section and section 164, kind of surveillance device means—

    • (a) an interception device:

    • (b) a visual surveillance device:

    • (c) a tracking device.

164 Information to be included in report on surveillance device warrants and residual warrants
  • The information required to be included in an annual report by section 163(1)(f) is the following:

    • (a) the number of applications for surveillance device warrants and residual warrants granted or refused in the period covered by the report:

    • (b) the number of surveillance device warrants granted in the period covered by the report that authorised the use of a surveillance device, and the number in respect of each kind of surveillance device:

    • (c) the number of residual warrants granted in the period covered by the report that authorised the use of a device, technique, procedure, or activity, and the number in respect of each device, technique, procedure, or activity:

    • (d) the number of surveillance device warrants and residual warrants granted during the period covered by the report that authorised entry into private premises:

    • (e) in respect of each kind of surveillance device authorised by a surveillance device warrant issued during the period covered by the report, the numbers of that kind of device used—

      • (i) for a period of no more than 24 hours:

      • (ii) for a period of more than 24 hours but no more than 3 days:

      • (iii) for a period of more than 3 days but no more than 7 days:

      • (iv) for a period of more than 7 days but no more than 21 days:

      • (v) for a period of more than 21 days but no more than 60 days:

    • (f) in respect of each residual warrant issued during the period covered by the report, the type of device, technique, procedure, or activity authorised:

    • (g) the number of criminal proceedings commenced in respect of which evidential material relevant to those proceedings was obtained directly or indirectly from carrying out activities under the authority of a surveillance device warrant or a residual warrant issued in the period covered by the report, and the number of such proceedings resulting in a conviction:

    • (h) the number of occasions on which activities that were carried out under the authority of a surveillance device warrant or a residual warrant in the period covered by the report did not lead to the bringing of criminal proceedings within 90 days of those activities:

    • (i) if a Judge has reported to the chief executive under section 57, 58, or 69 about a breach of any of the conditions of the issue of a surveillance device warrant or residual warrant, or use of a surveillance device not authorised under section 45, the number of those reports and the details of the breaches or the lack of authorisation reported.

Subpart 8Offences

165 Failing to comply with examination order
  • (1) Every person commits an offence if he or she, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with an examination order.

    (2) Every person who commits an offence against subsection (1) is liable on indictment,—

    • (a) in the case of an individual, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 1 year or a fine not exceeding $15,000 or both:

    • (b) in the case of a body corporate, to a fine not exceeding $40,000.

166 Failing to comply with production order
  • (1) Every person commits an offence if he or she, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with a production order.

    (2) Every person who commits an offence against subsection (1) is liable on summary conviction,—

    • (a) in the case of an individual, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 1 year:

    • (b) in the case of a body corporate, to a fine not exceeding $40,000.

167 False application for examination order, production order, search warrant, surveillance device warrant, or residual warrant
  • Every person commits an offence punishable on summary conviction by a term not exceeding 3 years who makes an application for an examination order, production order, search warrant, surveillance device warrant, or residual warrant that contains any assertion or other statement known by the person to be false.

168 Leaving search location in breach of direction
  • Every person commits an offence and is liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 months who, without reasonable excuse,—

    • (a) fails to comply with a direction under section 115(1) (special powers where application for search warrant pending); or

    • (b) leaves any place or vehicle at which he or she is detained under section 116(1).

169 Offences relating to stopping vehicles
  • (1) Every person commits an offence and is liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding $1,000 who, without reasonable excuse,—

    • (a) fails to stop as soon as practicable when required to do so by a person exercising a power to stop or search a vehicle; or

    • (b) fails to comply with a requirement made by that person under section 124 or any other applicable statutory search power.

    (2) Any member of the police may arrest without warrant any person whom the member of the police has reasonable grounds to suspect has committed an offence against subsection (1).

170 Offence of failing to carry out obligations in relation to computer search
  • Every person commits an offence and is liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 1 year or to a fine not exceeding $2,000, or to both, who fails, without reasonable excuse, to assist a person exercising a search power when requested to do so under section 126(1).

171 Offence to disclose information acquired through search or surveillance
  • (1) No person who, as a consequence of exercising a surveillance power or as a consequence of assisting another person to exercise a power or carry out an activity of that kind, acquires information about any person may knowingly disclose the substance, meaning, or purport of that information, or any part of that information, otherwise than in the performance of that person's duty.

    (2) Every person who acts in contravention of subsection (1) commits an offence and is liable on summary conviction,—

    • (a) in the case of a body corporate, to a fine not exceeding $50,000:

    • (b) in the case of an individual, to a fine not exceeding $10,000.

Subpart 9Miscellaneous

172 Effect of proceedings
  • (1) This section applies when any proceeding has been commenced in any court in respect of—

    • (a) the exercise of any power conferred by this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule; or

    • (b) the discharge of any duty imposed by this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule; or

    • (c) the use for investigative purposes of any evidential material obtained from the execution of a power or discharge of a duty imposed by this Act or any enactment specified in the Schedule.

    (2) Until a final decision in relation to the proceeding is given,—

    • (a) the power or duty to which the proceeding relates may be, or may continue to be, exercised or discharged as if the proceeding had not been commenced, and no person is excused from fulfilling any obligation under this Act or any other enactment by reason of that proceeding; and

    • (b) any evidential material obtained from the execution of the power or discharge of the duty to which the proceeding relates may be, or may continue to be used for investigative purposes.

    (3) Subsection (2) has effect despite any interim order made in the proceeding unless the High Court is satisfied that—

    • (a) the applicant has established a prima facie case that the warrant or order in question is unlawful; and

    • (b) the applicant would suffer substantial harm from the exercise or discharge of the power or duty; and

    • (c) if the power or duty is exercised or discharged before a final decision is made in the proceeding, none of the remedies specified in subsection (4), or any combination of those remedies, could subsequently provide an adequate remedy for that harm; and

    • (d) the terms of that order do unduly hinder or restrict the investigation or prosecution.

    (4) The remedies are as follows:

    • (a) any remedy that the court may grant in making a final decision in relation to the proceeding (for example, a declaration):

    • (b) any damages that the applicant may be able to claim in concurrent or subsequent proceedings:

    • (c) any opportunity that the applicant may have, as defendant in a criminal proceeding, to challenge the admissibility of any evidence obtained as a result of the exercise or discharge of the power or duty.

    (5) An interim order that overrides subsection (3) because paragraphs (a) to (d) of that subsection apply—

    • (a) ceases to have effect on—

      • (i) a date specified in that order; or

      • (ii) any date subsequently specified by the High Court on being satisfied that paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (3) apply to the interim order; and

    • (b) may be extended or renewed (whether before, on, or after its expiry) by the High Court, but only if the High Court is satisfied that paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (3) continue to apply.

173 Service of orders and notices
  • (1) Where an order or notice is to be given to a person for the purposes of this Act, it may be given—

    • (a) by delivering it personally to the person; or

    • (b) by delivering it at the usual or last known place of residence or business of the person, including by fax or by electronic mail; or

    • (c) by sending it by prepaid post addressed to the person at the usual or last known place of residence or business of the person.

    (2) Where an order or notice is to be served on a corporation for the purposes of this subpart, service on an officer of the corporation, or on the registered office of the corporation, in accordance with subsection (1) is deemed to be service on the corporation.

    (3) Where an order or notice is to be served on a partnership for the purposes of this subpart, service on any one of the partners in accordance with subsection (1) or (2) is deemed to be service on the partnership.

    (4) Where an order or notice is sent by post to a person in accordance with subsection (1)(c), the order or notice is deemed, in the absence of proof to the contrary, to have been given on the third day after the day on which it was posted.

    Compare: 1990 No 51 s 52

Part 5
Amendments, repeals, and miscellaneous provisions

Subpart 1Amendments to search and seizure powers in other enactments (and to related provisions) used for law enforcement purposes

Amendments to Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997

174 Amendments to Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997
  • (1) This section amends the Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997.

    (2) Section 69(1) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting Any District Court Judge or Justice of the Peace who is satisfied, on application in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who is satisfied, on an application made in the manner provided in Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008; and

    • (b) omitting in the form set out in Schedule 1.

    (3) Section 69 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) Subject to section 70, the provisions of subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Animal Products Act 1999

175 Amendments to Animal Products Act 1999
  • (1) This section amends the Animal Products Act 1999.

    (2) Section 92 is amended by omitting section 95 and substituting subpart 3 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 94(1) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting Any District Court Judge, Community Magistrate, Justice of the Peace, or Registrar may issue a search warrant in the form set out in the Schedule and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may issue a search warrant; and

    • (b) omitting on application in writing made on oath and substituting on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 by an animal products officer or a member of the police.

    (4) Section 94 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) Subject to section 95, the provisions of subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) The Schedule is repealed.

Amendment to Antarctic Marine Living Resources Act 1981

176 Amendment to Antarctic Marine Living Resources Act 1981
  • (1) This section amends the Antarctic Marine Living Resources Act 1981.

    (2) Section 9 is amended by repealing subsections (3) to (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Antarctica (Environmental Protection) Act 1994

177 Amendments to Antarctica (Environmental Protection) Act 1994
  • (1) This section amends the Antarctica (Environmental Protection) Act 1994.

    (2) Section 42(1) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting a District Court Judge, a duly authorised Justice, a Community Magistrate, or a Registrar (not being a member of the Police), who, on application made and substituting an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act; and

    • (b) omitting , unconditionally or subject to conditions, a warrant authorising the entry and search of the area, at any time on one occasion within 14 days of the issue of the warrant (or within such further time as may be specified in the warrant) and substituting a warrant authorising the entry and search of the area.

    (3) Section 42 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (4) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 43 is amended by inserting the following subsection after subsection (1):

    • (1A) Subject to subsection (2), the provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) Section 44 is amended by omitting any of sections 41 to 43 and substituting section 41.

Amendments to Aviation Crimes Act 1972

178 Amendments to Aviation Crimes Act 1972
  • (1) This section amends the Aviation Crimes Act 1972.

    (2) Section 13(1)(b) is amended by adding and that a search of the first-mentioned person will disclose evidential material about that offence,.

    (3) Section 13 is amended by repealing subsections (3) and (4) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (4) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendment to Boxing and Wrestling Act 1981

179 Amendment to Boxing and Wrestling Act 1981
  • (1) This section amends the Boxing and Wrestling Act 1981.

    (2) Section 9 is repealed and the following section substituted:

    9 Search warrants
    • (1) An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may issue a search warrant if, on an application made by a member of the police in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act, he or she is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for believing that on any premises a contest is being conducted in breach of this Act or any regulations made under it.

      (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Civil Aviation Act 1990

180 Amendments to Civil Aviation Act 1990
  • (1) This section amends the Civil Aviation Act 1990.

    (2) Section 24(4) is amended by omitting a judicial officer on written application on oath and substituting an issuing officer on application in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 24 is amended by repealing subsection (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (5) Subject to subsections (6) and (7), subparts 2 and 3 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in relation to the issue of a warrant under subsection (4) and its execution.

Amendments to Conservation Act 1987

181 Amendments to Conservation Act 1987
  • (1) This section amends the Conservation Act 1987.

    (2) Section 40(4A) and (4B) are repealed.

    (3) Section 40 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (7) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 46 is amended by repealing subsections (1) to (4).

Amendments to Customs and Excise Act 1996

182 Amendments to Customs and Excise Act 1996
  • Sections 183 to 186 amend the Customs and Excise Act 1996.

183 Amendments to sections 139 to 141 of Customs and Excise Act 1996
  • (1) Section 139 is amended by adding the following subsections:

    • (5) The provision of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of the power conferred by subsection (1)(d).

    • (6) Despite subsection (5), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (2) Section 140(2) is amended by omitting subsection (1) and substituting subsection (1)(a) to (c).

    (3) Section 140 is amended by adding the following subsections:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of the power conferred by subsection (1).

    • (4) Despite subsection (3), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (4) Section 141 is amended by omitting section 139 or 140 and substituting section 139(1)(a) to (c) or 140(1)(a) to (c).

184 Amendments to sections 144 to 173 of Customs and Excise Act 1996
  • (1) Section 144 is amended by adding the following subsections:

    • (5) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of a search undertaken under this section.

    • (6) Despite subsection (5), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (2) Section 149A(3) is amended by omitting 149D and substituting 149C.

    (3) Section 149B(4) and (5) are repealed.

    (4) Section 149B is amended by adding the following subsections:

    • (8) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of the powers conferred by this section.

    • (9) Despite subsection (8), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (5) Section 149BA(1) is amended by omitting believe and substituting suspect.

    (6) Section 149BA(3) is repealed.

    (7) Section 149BA is amended by repealing subsection (5) and substituting the following subsections:

    • (5) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of the powers conferred by this section.

    • (6) Despite subsection (5), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (8) Section 149C is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsections:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of the powers conferred by this section.

    • (3) Despite subsection (2), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (9) Section 149D is repealed.

    (10) Section 152 is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsections:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of the powers conferred by this section.

    • (3A) Despite subsection (3), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (11) The heading to section 165 is amended by omitting search and substituting inspection.

    (12) Section 165(1) is amended by omitting search, in each place where it appears.

    (13) Section 166(1) is amended by omitting search, in each place where it appears.

    (14) Section 167(1) is amended by omitting A District Court Judge, Justice of the Peace, Community Magistrate, or Registrar (not being a constable) may issue a search warrant in the prescribed form if he or she is satisfied, on an application by a Customs officer in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may issue a search warrant if he or she is satisfied, on an application by a Customs officer made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (15) Section 167 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (4) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    • (3) Despite subsection (2), sections 121(2), 127(5)(e), and 128, and subparts 5 and 7 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 do not apply to any goods forfeit to the Crown under section 225 of this Act.

    (16) Sections 168 to 171 and 173 are repealed.

    (17) Section 172(1) is amended by inserting (other than a search to which Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 applies) after conferred by this Act.

185 Seizure and detention of goods suspected to be certain risk goods or evidence of commission of certain offences
  • (1) Section 175C(1)(b) is amended by adding the following subparagraphs:

    • (vii) section 6, 7, or 12A of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975:

    • (viii) section 123, 124, 131, or 131A of the Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993.

    (2) Section 175C is amended by repealing subsection (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (5) Subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 applies with any necessary modifications to goods detained under subsection (1).

186 Amendments to Part 17 of Customs and Excise Act 1996
  • (1) Section 286(1)(aa) is repealed.

    (2) Section 305A(1) is amended by omitting 167, and 171 and substituting and 167.

Amendments to Dog Control Act 1996

187 Amendments to Dog Control Act 1996
  • (1) This section amends the Dog Control Act 1996.

    (2) Section 14(3)(a) is amended by omitting a District Court Judge on written application on oath and substituting an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) on application by a dog control officer in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 14 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (5) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Electoral Act 1993

188 Amendments to Electoral Act 1993
  • (1) This section amends the Electoral Act 1993.

    (2) Section 226A(1) is amended by omitting section 198 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting section 7 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 226A is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 226A(4) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting section 199 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008; and

    • (b) omitting from paragraph (a) section 199 and substituting subpart 5 of Part 4.

Amendments to Electoral Finance Act 2007

189 Amendments to Electoral Finance Act 2007
  • (1) This section amends the Electoral Finance Act 2007.

    (2) Section 139(1) is amended by omitting section 198 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting section 7 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 139 is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 139(4) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting section 199 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008; and

    • (b) omitting from paragraph (a) section 199 and substituting subpart 5 of Part 4.

Amendments to Extradition Act 1999

190 Amendments to Extradition Act 1999
  • (1) This section amends the Extradition Act 1999.

    (2) Section 83(2) is amended by omitting A District Court Judge who, on application in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 83 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (4) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 (except subpart 5) apply.

    (4) Sections 84 to 88 are repealed.

Amendments to Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993

191 Amendments to Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993
  • (1) This section and section 192 amend the Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993.

    (2) Section 109 is amended by omitting A District Court Judge, Justice, or Community Magistrate, or a Registrar (not being a member of the police) may, on application in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may, on an application in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 109A(1) is amended by omitting A District Court Judge may, on application in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (4) Section 109B is amended by omitting A Justice, Community Magistrate, or Registrar (not being a member of the police) may, on an application in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (5) Section 118 is repealed.

192 New section 110 substituted
  • Sections 110 to 114 are repealed and the following section is substituted:

    110 Application of Part 4 of Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008
    • (1) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of any search warrant issued under section 109, 109A, or 109B.

      (2) This section is subject to sections 115 to 117.

Amendments to Financial Transactions Reporting Act 1996

193 Amendments to Financial Transactions Reporting Act 1996
  • (1) This section amends the Financial Transactions Reporting Act 1996.

    (2) Section 38(2), (3), and (4)(a) are repealed.

    (3) Section 44 is amended by omitting Any District Court Judge, Justice, or Community Magistrate, or any Registrar (not being a member of the Police), who, on application in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (4) Section 44 is amended by adding the following subsection as subsection (2):

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) Sections 45 to 51 are repealed.

Amendment to Food Act 1981

194 Amendment to Food Act 1981
  • (1) This section amends the Food Act 1981.

    (2) Section 15A is amended by omitting section 198 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting section 7 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

Amendments to Gambling Act 2003

195 Amendments to Gambling Act 2003
  • (1) This section amends the Gambling Act 2003.

    (2) Section 335 is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (3) Section 335(5) is repealed.

    (4) Section 336 is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) Section 336(5) is repealed.

    (6) Section 337 is repealed.

    (7) Section 340 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) An application must be made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 to an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of that Act).

    (8) Section 340(3) is amended by omitting The Judge, Justice, Magistrate, or Registrar and substituting The issuing officer.

    (9) Section 340 is amended by inserting the following subsection after subsection (3):

    • (3A) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (10) Sections 341 to 343 and 345 are repealed.

Amendments to Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996

196 Amendments to Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996
  • (1) This section amends the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996.

    (2) Section 119(1) is amended by omitting District Court Judge or Justice of the Peace or Community Magistrate or any Registrar who is satisfied, on application in writing made on oath and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who is satisfied, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 119 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (8) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 120 is repealed.

Amendments to Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003

197 Amendments to Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003
  • (1) This section amends the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003.

    (2) Section 10(1) is amended by omitting section 198 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting section 7 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 10 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 10(3) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting section 199 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008; and

    • (b) omitting from paragraph (a) section 199 of that Act and substituting subpart 5 of Part 4 of that Act.

Amendments to Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004

198 Amendments to Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004
  • (1) This section amends the Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004.

    (2) Section 68 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (4) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (3) Section 69(2) is amended by omitting A District Court Judge, a Justice, or a Court Registrar who is not a member of the police, may, on written application made on oath by an authorised person, issue a search warrant in the form set out in Schedule 2 and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act, issue a search warrant.

    (4) Section 69 is amended by repealing subsections (3) to (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) Sections 70 to 72 and Schedule 2 are repealed.

Amendments to Human Tissue Act 2008

199 Amendments to Human Tissue Act 2008
  • (1) This section amends the Human Tissue Act 2008.

    (2) Section 68 is amended by repealing subsections (2) and (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply with any necessary modifications.

    (3) Section 69(2) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting A District Court Judge, a Community Magistrate, a Justice, or a Registrar who is not a member of the police may, on a written application made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may, on an application made in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act; and

    • (b) by omitting in the prescribed form.

    (4) Section 69 is amended by omitting subsections (3) to (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply with any necessary modifications.

    (5) Sections 70 to 72 and 79 are repealed.

Amendments to Immigration Advisers Licensing Act 2007

200 Amendments to Immigration Advisers Licensing Act 2007
  • Sections 201 and 202 amend the Immigration Advisers Licensing Act 2007.

201 New sections 56 and 57 substituted
  • Sections 56 and 57 are repealed and the following sections substituted:

    56 Purposes of inspection
    • The powers in section 57 may be used for one or more of the following purposes:

      • (a) administering the licensing regime:

      • (b) obtaining information in relation to complaints in respect of person who are or have formerly been licensed to provide immigration advice:

      • (c) obtaining information in respect of person who has applied to be licensed:

      • (d) investigating offences under this Act.

    57 Interpretation powers
    • (1) Any person authorised by the Registrar may, for a purpose set out in section 56,—

      • (a) at any reasonable time, enter any premises where the person has good cause to suspect that—

        • (i) any licensed immigration adviser or former licensed immigration adviser works or has worked in the past 2 years; or

        • (ii) any person who has applied to be licensed as an immigration adviser works; or

        • (iii) a person provides immigration advice or contracts or employs a person to provide immigration advice:

      • (b) question any licensed immigration adviser, former licensed immigration adviser, or other person at any premises of a kind described in paragraph (a):

      • (c) require a person of a kind described in paragraph (a) to produce for inspection relevant documents in that person's possession or under that person's control:

      • (d) inspect and take copies of documents referred to in paragraph (c):

      • (e) retain documents referred to in paragraph (c), if there are grounds for believing that they are evidence of the commission of an offence.

      (2) If documents are retained under subsection (1)(e), subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Act 2008 applies.

202 Other amendments to Immigration Advisers Licensing Act 2007
  • (1) Section 58 is repealed.

    (2) Section 59 is amended by omitting or 58.

    (3) Section 60 is amended by omitting or 58.

    (4) Section 61(1) is amended by omitting A Judge who, on written application on oath, and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act,.

    (5) Section 61 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of an entry warrant.

    (6) Section 62(3)(c) is amended by omitting or 58.

    (7) Section 69(1) is amended by omitting or 58 in each place where it appears.

Amendments to International Crimes and International Criminal Court Act 2000

203 Amendments to International Crimes and International Criminal Court Act 2000
  • (1) This section amends the International Crimes and International Criminal Court Act 2000.

    (2) Section 102(1) is amended by omitting a District Court Judge, on an application made on oath or affirmation and substituting an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 102 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (4) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 (except subpart 5) apply.

    (4) Sections 103 to 107 are repealed.

Amendments to International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995

204 Amendments to International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995
  • (1) This section amends the International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995.

    (2) Section 48(1) is amended by omitting Any Judge who, on an application in writing made on oath and substituting Any issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 48(2) is amended by omitting Any Judge who, on application in writing made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (4) Section 48 is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) Sections 49 to 50A are repealed.

    (6) Sections 51 and 52 are repealed.

Amendments to Land Transport Act 1998

205 Amendments to Land Transport Act 1998
  • (1) This section amends the Land Transport Act 1998.

    (2) Section 119 is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) An enforcement officer may, without warrant, enter, by force if necessary, a building or place where a vehicle to which section 96, 96A, or 123 applies is being stored or kept, and seize and impound the vehicle,—

      • (a) if—

        • (i) an enforcement officer has been freshly pursuing the vehicle; or

        • (ii) it is likely that a person was about to remove, conceal, destroy, or dispose of the vehicle; or

        • (iii) an enforcement officer believes on reasonable grounds that the vehicle was about to be used in the commission of a crime; and

      • (b) if, because of the time of the day or the locality, it was impracticable to obtain a warrant without creating an opportunity for the person to do anything referred to in paragraph (a)(ii) or (iii).

    (3) Section 119(5) is amended by omitting apply on oath to a District Court Judge and substituting apply, in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008, to an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of that Act),.

    (4) Section 119 is amended by repealing subsection (6) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (6) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Local Government Act 2002

206 Amendments to Local Government Act 2002
  • (1) This section amends the Local Government Act 2002.

    (2) Section 165(1) is amended by omitting A judicial officer and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008).

    (3) Section 165(2)(a) is amended by omitting in writing and on oath and substituting in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (4) Section 165 is amended by repealing subsections (3) and (4) and substituting the following subsections:

    • (3) None of the following persons may act as an issuing officer under this section:

      • (a) the mayor or any elected member of the local authority:

      • (b) any employee of the local authority.

    • (4) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply as if a warrant issued under subsection (1) were a search warrant.

    (5) Section 165(2)(b) is amended by omitting judicial officer and substituting issuing officer:

    (6) Section 166 is amended by repealing subsections (1) and (2) and substituting the following subsections:

    • (1) An enforcement officer executing a warrant issued under section 165(1) must be accompanied by a member of the police.

    • (2) Subsection (1) overrides section 165(3).

    (7) Section 167(1) is amended by omitting or section 165.

    (8) Section 168(1) is amended by inserting seized and impounded under section 165 after dispose of property.

    (9) Section 171(2) is repealed.

    (10) Section 172(3)(a) is amended by omitting a District Court Judge on written application on oath and substituting an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) on application made in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (11) Section 172 is amended by repealing subsection (4) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (4) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of any power of entry under this section, subject to subsection (3)(b).

    (12) Section 173 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978

207 Amendments to Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978
  • (1) This section and section 208 amend the Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978.

    (2) Section 13 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (3) Section 13(5) is repealed.

208 New section 14 substituted
  • Section 14 is repealed and the following section substituted:

    14 Officer may obtain warrant
    • (1) An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Act 2008) may, on application by an officer made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act, issue a search warrant authorising the entry and search of any dwellinghouse, place, vehicle, aircraft, or hovercraft if the issuing officer is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to suspect that—

      • (a) any breach of this Act or any regulation made under it has been, is being, or will be committed; or

      • (b) preparation has been made to commit a breach of this kind.

      (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Marine Reserves Act 1971

209 Amendments to Marine Reserves Act 1971
  • (1) This section amends the Marine Reserves Act 1971.

    (2) Section 18 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of any entry and search conducted under subsection (1)(d).

    (3) Section 18A is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Sections 18B to 18F are repealed.

Amendments to Maritime Security Act 2004

210 Amendments to Maritime Security Act 2004
  • (1) This section amends the Maritime Security Act 2004.

    (2) Section 51(4) is amended by omitting A judicial officer who, on written application made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 51 is amended by inserting the following subsection after subsection (6):

    • (6A) Subject to subsections (5) and (6), the provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of a warrant issued under subsection (4).

    (4) Section 55(1) is amended by omitting paragraph (b) and substituting the following paragraph:

    • (b) the member of the police has reasonable grounds to suspect that—

      • (i) an offence against this Act has been, is being, or will be committed whether by that person or any other person; and

      • (ii) search of the person refusing to consent will disclose evidential material relating to that offence.

Amendments to Maritime Transport Act 1994

211 Amendments to Maritime Transport Act 1994
  • (1) This section amends the Maritime Transport Act 1994.

    (2) Section 453(2)(a) and (b) are repealed.

    (3) Section 453(5) is amended by omitting or subsection (2).

    (4) Section 454 is amended by—

    • (a) omitting A District Court Judge, a duly authorised Justice, Community Magistrate, or a Registrar (not being a member of the Police), who, on a written application made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act; and

    • (b) omitting , unconditionally or conditionally or subject to conditions, a warrant (in the prescribed form authorising that person to enter the place on one occasion within 14 days of the issue of the warrant) and substituting a warrant authorising the entry and search of the place.

    (5) Section 454 is amended by adding the following subsection as subsection (2):

    • (2) Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 applies.

    (6) Section 455(1) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting a District Court Judge, a duly authorised Justice, a Community Magistrate, or a Registrar (not being a member of the Police), who, on a written application made on oath and substituting an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act; and

    • (b) omitting , unconditionally or subject to conditions, a warrant (in the prescribed form) authorising the entry and search of the place at any reasonable time on one occasion within 14 days of the issue of the warrant and substituting a warrant authorising the entry and search of the place.

    (7) Section 455 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (8) Sections 456 and 457 are repealed.

Amendments to Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003

212 Amendments to Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003
  • (1) This section amends the Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003.

    (2) Section 130(1) is amended by omitting District Court Judge, Community Magistrate, Justice of the Peace, or Registrar of a District Court may issue a search warrant for any place if satisfied, on application in writing made on oath, and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may issue a search warrant for any place if satisfied, on application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008,.

    (3) Section 130 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Sections 131 to 140 are repealed.

Amendments to National Parks Act 1980

213 Amendments to National Parks Act 1980
  • (1) This section amends the National Parks Act 1980.

    (2) Section 61(2) is repealed.

    (3) Section 61(3) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting If and substituting If, in any case to which paragraph (a) or (b) applies,; and

    • (b) omitting then, and substituting then, despite subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008,; and

    • (c) repealing paragraph (c).

    (4) Section 61(6) is amended by omitting , and shall be retained by the Director-General and dealt with under subsection (7) or subsection (8) of this section.

    (5) Section 61 is amended by repealing subsections (7) and (8) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (7) Subject to subsection (3), the provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (6) Section 65 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (7) Section 66 is amended by repealing subsections (2) and (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Overseas Investment Act 2005

214 Amendments to Overseas Investment Act 2005
  • (1) This section amends the Overseas Investment Act 2005.

    (2) Section 56(2) is amended by omitting writing and on oath to the Court and substituting the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 to an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of that Act).

    (3) Section 56(3) is amended by omitting Court and substituting issuing officer.

    (4) Section 56 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (5) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) Sections 57 to 60 are repealed.

Amendments to Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996

215 Amendments to Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996
  • (1) This section and section 216 amend the Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996.

    (2) Section 23(1) is amended by omitting District Court Judge or Justice or Community Magistrate or any Registrar (not being a constable) who is satisfied, on application in writing made on oath and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who is satisfied, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 23 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (8) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 26(1) and (2) are repealed.

216 New section 25 substituted
  • Section 25 is repealed and the following section substituted:

    25 Retention of property seized
    • If any member of the police or officer seizes any substance or goods under this Act, subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 applies to that substance or those goods.

Amendment to Petroleum Demand Restraint Act 1981

217 Amendment to Petroleum Demand Restraint Act 1981
  • (1) This section amends the Petroleum Demand Restraint Act 1981.

    (2) Section 17(4) is amended by omitting sections 198 and 199 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 and substituting section 6 and subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

Amendments to Prostitution Reform Act 2003

218 Amendments to Prostitution Reform Act 2003
  • (1) This section amends the Prostitution Reform Act 2003.

    (2) Section 30(1) is amended by omitting A District Court Judge, Justice, Community Magistrate, or Registrar of a District Court (who is not a member of the police) and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008).

    (3) Section 30 is amended by repealing subsections (2) and (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply as if a warrant referred to in subsection (1) were a search warrant.

    (4) Sections 31 to 33 are repealed.

Amendments to Radiation Protection Act 1965

219 Amendments to Radiation Protection Act 1965
  • (1) This section amends the Radiation Protection Act 1965.

    (2) Section 24(2) is amended by omitting If a Justice of the Peace or Community Magistrate is satisfied on oath and substituting If an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) is satisfied on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 24 is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Radiocommunications Act 1989

220 Amendments to Radiocommunications Act 1989
  • (1) This section amends the Radiocommunications Act 1989.

    (2) Section 120(3) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting District Court Judge, Justice, or Community Magistrate, or any Court Registrar (not being a constable), is satisfied, on application in writing made on oath and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) is satisfied, on application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008; and

    • (b) omitting that District Court Judge, Justice, Community Magistrate, or Court Registrar and substituting that issuing officer.

    (3) Section 120 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (4) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Sections 121 to 127 are repealed.

Amendments to Reserves Act 1977

221 Amendments to Reserves Act 1977
  • (1) This section amends the Reserves Act 1977.

    (2) Section 93 is amended by repealing subsection (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (5) In this section officer means—

      • (a) any ranger or constable; and

      • (b) any officer or employee of an administering body who is authorised by that body to exercise the powers of an officer under this Part.

    (3) Section 95(1) is amended by omitting , and shall be retained by the administering body, or by the Commissioner if there is no administering body, pending the trial of that person for the offence in respect of which it was seized.

    (4) Section 95(2) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting then, and substituting then, despite subpart 5 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008,; and

    • (b) repealing paragraph (c).

    (5) Section 95 is amended by repealing subsection (6) and substituting the following subsections:

    • (6) Any firearm, trap, net, or other like object found illegally in the possession of any person in any reserve, and any tool or instrument or other equipment found in the possession of any person in any reserve and used in committing an offence in the reserve may be seized by any officer (within the meaning of section 93(5)).

    • (6A) Subject to subsection (2), the provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of the seizure of any thing under this section.

    (6) Section 100 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply in respect of any entry, search, or seizure conducted under this section.

Amendments to Resource Management Act 1991

222 Amendments to Resource Management Act 1991
  • (1) This section amends the Resource Management Act 1991.

    (2) Section 334(1) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting District Court Judge or any duly authorised Justice or Community Magistrate or Registrar who, on application in writing made on oath, and substituting an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act,; and

    • (b) omitting on one occasion within 14 days of the date of issue of the warrant and at any time that is reasonable in the circumstances.

    (3) Section 334 is amended by repealing subsections (2) and (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Sections 335 and 337 are repealed.

Amendments to Sale of Liquor Act 1989

223 Amendments to Sale of Liquor Act 1989
  • (1) This section amends the Sale of Liquor Act 1989.

    (2) Section 177(1) is amended by omitting any District Court Judge, Justice, or Community Magistrate, or any Registrar (not being a constable), is satisfied, on application made on oath and substituting an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) is satisfied, on an application made by a member of the police in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 177 is amended by repealing subsections (2) to (9) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Trade in Endangered Species Act 1989

224 Amendments to Trade in Endangered Species Act 1989
  • (1) This section amends the Trade in Endangered Species Act 1989.

    (2) Section 37(3), (4) and (6) are repealed.

    (3) Section 37 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (8) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 38(2) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting District Court Judge or Justice of the Peace or Community Magistrate or Registrar of any Court (not being a member of the Police), who, on application by an officer in writing made an oath and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who, on application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act; and

    • (b) omitting , and the provisions of subsections (3) to (8) of section 198 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 shall apply accordingly.

    (5) Section 38 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (4) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

Amendments to Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act 2007

225 Amendments to Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act 2007
  • (1) This section amends the Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act 2007.

    (2) Section 51(1) is amended by adding in the manner provided in Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 51(2) is repealed.

    (4) Section 51(3) is amended by omitting in writing and on oath to the District Court and substituting to an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008).

    (5) Section 51 is amended by repealing subsection (5) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (5) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (6) Sections 52 to 56 and 58(j) are repealed.

Amendments to Wild Animal Control Act 1977

226 Amendments to Wild Animal Control Act 1977
  • (1) This section amends the Wild Animal Control Act 1977.

    (2) Section 12(10) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting , on production of his or her warrant of appointment if so required,; and

    • (b) omitting from the proviso under the hand of a District Court Judge and substituting in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 by an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of that Act).

    (3) Section 12(11) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting District Court Judge or Justice of the Peace or Community Magistrate who is satisfied on oath that there is probable cause to suspect and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to believe; and

    • (b) omitting at such time or times of the day as are mentioned in the warrant, but no such warrant shall continue in force for more than 14 days from the date thereof.

    (4) Section 12 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (13) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (5) Section 13(1) is amended by omitting , on production of his warrant of appointment if so required,.

    (6) Section 13(6) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting , on production of his warrant of appointment if so required,; and

    • (b) omitting from the proviso under the hand of a District Court Judge or Justice of the Peace or Community Magistrate and substituting issued by an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008).

    (7) Section 13(7) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting District Court Judge or Justice of the Peace or Community Magistrate who is satisfied on oath that there is probable cause to suspect and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to believe; and

    • (b) omitting at such time or times of the day as are mentioned in the warrant, but no such warrant shall continue in force for more than 14 days from the date thereof.

    (8) Section 13 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (10) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (9) The proviso to section 14(2) is amended by omitting under the hand of a District Court Judge or Justice of the Peace or Community Magistrate and substituting issued by an issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008).

Amendments to Wildlife Act 1953

227 Amendments to Wildlife Act 1953
  • (1) This section amends the Wildlife Act 1953.

    (2) The proviso to section 39(1)(f)(iii) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting Justice or Community Magistrate who is satisfied on oath that there is probable cause to suspect and substituting issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who is satisfied on reasonable grounds; and

    • (b) omitting at such time or times in the day or night as are mentioned in the warrant, but no such warrant shall continue in force for more than 14 days from the date thereof.

    (3) Section 39 is amended by adding the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Section 56A is amended by omitting 149C(1) and (2), 149D and substituting 149C(1) to (3).

Amendments to Wine Act 2003

228 Amendments to Wine Act 2003
  • (1) This section amends the Wine Act 2003.

    (2) Section 65(1) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting Any District Court Judge, Community Magistrate, Justice of the Peace, or Registrar may issue a search warrant, in the form set out in Schedule 1 and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) may issue a search warrant; and

    • (b) omitting on application in writing made on oath and substituting on an application made by a member of the police or a wine officer made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008.

    (3) Section 65 is amended by repealing subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (2) Subject to section 66, the provisions of subpart 2 of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply.

    (4) Schedule 1 is repealed.

Subpart 2Amendments to search and seizure powers in other enactments (and to related provisions) used for regulatory purposes

Amendments to Commerce Act 1986

229 Amendments to Commerce Act 1986
  • (1) This section amends the Commerce Act 1986.

    (2) Section 98A(2) is amended by omitting A District Court Judge, Justice or Community Magistrate, or a Court Registrar (not being a constable) who is satisfied on application made on oath and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008) who is satisfied, on an application made in the manner provided in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 98A is amended by repealing subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) The provisions of Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 apply, with any necessary modifications.

    (4) Sections 98B to 98F are repealed.

    (5) Section 98G is amended by omitting to 98F and substituting and 98A.

Amendments to Fair Trading Act 1986

230 Amendments to Fair Trading Act 1986
  • (1) This section amends the Fair Trading Act 1986.

    (2) Section 47(2) is amended by—

    • (a) omitting A District Court Judge, Justice, Community Magistrate, or Court Registrar (not being a constable) and substituting An issuing officer (within the meaning of section 3 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008; and

    • (b) omitting on oath and substituting in the manner provided for an application for a search warrant in subpart 2 of Part 4 of that Act.

    (3) Section 47 is amended by omitting subsection (3) and substituting the following subsection:

    • (3) Part 4 of the Search and Surveillance Powers Act 2008 applies.

    (4) Sections 47A to 47E are repealed.

Subpart 3Other repeals and amendments

231 Arms Act 1983 amended
  • (1) This section amends the Arms Act 1983.

    (2) The heading above section 60 and sections 60 to 61 are repealed.

232 Crimes Act 1961 amended
  • (1) This section amends the Crimes Act 1961.

    (2) Sections 202B, 224 and 225, 312M, the heading above section 314A and sections 314A to 314D, and sections 317 to 317B are repealed.

233 Local Government Act 1974 amended
  • (1) This section amends the Local Government Act 1974.

    (2) Section 342A is repealed.

234 Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 amended
  • (1) This section amends the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975.

    (2) Sections 18 and 18A are repealed and the following section is substituted:

    18 Seizing and destroying prohibited plants and seeds
    • (1) The following persons may take any or all of the actions described in subsection (2):

      • (a) a member of the police:

      • (b) an officer of Customs:

      • (c) an officer of the Ministry of Health:

      • (d) a Medical Officer of Health:

      • (e) an assistant thought to be necessary by any of the persons in paragraphs (a) to (d).

      (2) The actions are to seize and destroy any of the following:

      • (a) a prohibited plant that is not being cultivated in accordance with—

        • (i) the conditions of a licence granted under this Act; or

        • (ii) regulations made under this Act:

      • (b) the seed of a prohibited plant that is not in the possession of a person—

        • (i) authorised under this Act to cultivate the plant; or

        • (ii) permitted by regulations made under this Act to have the seed in his or her possession.

    (3) Section 36 is amended by omitting 149C(1) and (2), 149D and substituting 149C(1) to (3).

235 Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978 amended
  • (1) This section amends the Misuse of Drugs Amendment Act 1978.

    (2) Section 12(1) is amended by inserting the following paragraph after paragraph (b):

    • (ba) allow the replaced package or goods to be delivered by a person who has agreed to co-operate with Customs; or.

    (3) Sections 12A to 12C and 25 are repealed.

236 Police Act 1958 amended
  • (1) This section amends the Police Act 1958.

    (2) Sections 57A and 57B are repealed.

    (3) Section 59(1) is amended by inserting lost before goods and chattels.

237 Summary Proceedings Act 1957 amended
  • Sections 198 to 199 are repealed.

238 Telecommunications (Residual Provisions) Act 1987 repealed
  • The Telecommunications (Residual Provisions) Act 1987 (1987 No 116) is repealed.

Subpart 4Regulation-making powers, transitional provisions, and review provision

239 Regulations
  • (1) The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations for any or all of the following purposes:

    • (a) prescribing the form of a surveillance device warrant, residual warrant, search warrant, warrant authorising entry to a dwellinghouse or marae, or similar kinds of warrants:

    • (b) prescribing procedures to be followed for the purposes of making and resolving claims of privilege under subpart 5 of Part 4:

    • (c) providing for any other matters contemplated by the Act, necessary for its administration, or necessary for giving it full effect.

    (2) Regulations made under subsection (1)(a) may do any or all of the following:

    • (a) prescribe different forms of warrant for use under different enactments (including each enactment listed in the Schedule):

    • (b) prescribe any form of warrant by listing the minimum information requirements to be included:

    • (c) authorise a chief executive or any other specified person or class of person to authorise variations in the language, provisions, or format of any form of warrant in the warrant:

    • (d) authorise a chief executive or any other specified class of person to include additional information in a prescribed form of warrant.

Transitional provisions

240 Transitional provision in relation to reporting requirements
  • For the purposes of section 163, the period to be reported on in the first annual report published after the commencement of this Act begins with the commencement of this Act and ends with the end of the financial year or other period ordinarily the subject of the report.

241 Transitional provision in relation to sections 198 to 199 of Summary Proceedings Act 1957
  • (1) Despite their repeal by section 237, sections 198 to 199 of the Summary Proceedings Act 1957 remain in force for the purposes of any enactment that incorporates or refers to any of those provisions.

    (2) Subsection (1) does not limit the application of the Interpretation Act 1999.

    (3) This section expires on the close of 30 June 2014.

Review provision

242 Review of operation of Act
  • (1) The Minister of Justice must, not later than 30 June 2014, refer to the Law Commission and the Ministry of Justice for consideration the following matters:

    • (a) the operation of the provisions of this Act since the date of the commencement of this section:

    • (b) whether those provisions should be retained or repealed:

    • (c) if they should be retained, whether any amendments to this Act are necessary or desirable.

    (2) The Law Commission and the Ministry must report jointly on those matters to the Minister of Justice within 1 year of the date on which the reference occurs.

    (3) The Minister of Justice must present a copy of the report provided under this section to the House of Representatives as soon as practicable after receiving it.


Schedule
Search powers in other enactments to which Part 4 of Search and Surveillance Act 2008 applies

s 3

Agriculture Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997

Section 69(1) (subparts 1 and 2 only).

Animal Products Act 1991

Section 94(1) (subparts 1 and 2 only).

Antarctic (Environmental Protection) Act 1994

Sections 42(1), 43(1).

Antarctic Marine Living Resources Act 1981

Section 9(1).

Aviation Crimes Act 1972

Section 13.

Boxing and Wrestling Act 1981

Section 9(1).

Civil Aviation Act 1990

Section 24(4) (subparts 1 to 3 only).

Commerce Act 1986

Section 98A(2).

Conservation Act 1987

Section 40(1) and (5).

Customs and Excise Act 1996

Section 38J(2) (subparts 1 and 2 only).

Section 38K (subparts 1, 3, and 7 only).

Section 144 (subparts 1, 3, and 7 only).

Section 166(1).

Section 167(1).

Section 173(1) (subparts 1 and 3 only).

Section 175C (subparts 1 and 5 only).

Dog Control Act 1996

Section 14(1) to (3).

Electoral Act 1993

Section 226A(1) and (4).

Electoral Finance Act 2007

Section 139(1) and (4).

Extradition Act 1999

Section 83.

Fair Trading Act 1986

Section 47(2).

Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993

Section 109.

Section 109A(1).

Section 109B.

Financial Transactions Reporting Act 1996

Section 44.

Gambling Act 2003

Section 335(1).

Section 336(1).

Section 340(3).

Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996

Section 119(1).

Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003

Section 10(1).

Human Assisted Reproductive Technologies Act 2004

Sections 68(1).

Section 69(2).

Human Tissue Act 2008

Section 68(1).

Section 69(2).

Immigration Advisers Licensing Act 2007

Section 58(1) and (2).

Section 61(1) (subparts 1 and 2 only).

International Crimes and International Criminal Court Act 2002

Section 102(1).

International War Crimes Tribunals Act 1995

Section 48(1) and (2).

Land Transport Act 1998

Section 119(3) and (5).

Local Government Act 2002

Section 165.

Section 166(1).

Section 167(1).

Section 168(1).

Section 172(3)(a).

Section 173(1).

Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978

Section 13(1).

Section 14(1)

Marine Reserves Act 1971

Section 18(1).

Maritime Security Act 2004

Section 51(4).

Maritime Transport Act 1994

Section 454(1).

Section 455(1).

Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003

Section 130(1).

National Parks Act 1980

Section 61(1) and (6).

Section 65(1).

Section 66(1).

Overseas Investment Act 2005

Section 56(3).

Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996

Section 23(1).

Petroleum Demand Restraint Act 1981

Section 17(4).

Prostitution Reform Act 2003

Section 30(1).

Radiation Protection Act 1965

Section 24(2).

Radiocommunications Act 1989

Section 120.

Reserves Act 1977

Section 95(1) and (6).

Section 100(1).

Resource Management Act 1991

Section 334(1).

Sale of Liquor Act 1989

Section 177(1).

Trade in Endangered Species Act 1989

Section 37(1) and (5).

Section 38(1) and (2).

Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act 2007

Section 51(4).

Wild Animal Control Act 1977

Section 12(10) and (11).

Section 13(1), (6), and (7).

Section 14(1) and (2).

Wildlife Act 1953

Section 39(1).

Wine Act 2003

Section 65(1) (subparts 1 and 2 only).