Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1971

  • revoked
  • Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1971: revoked, on 6 November 2008, by clause 3 of the Regulations Revocation Order 2008 (SR 2008/367).

Reprint
as at 6 November 2008

Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1971

(SR 1971/231)

  • Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1971: revoked, on 6 November 2008, by clause 3 of the Regulations Revocation Order 2008 (SR 2008/367).


Note

Changes authorised by section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989 have been made in this eprint.

A general outline of these changes is set out in the notes at the end of this eprint, together with other explanatory material about this eprint.

This notice is administered in the Department of Agriculture.


PURSUANT to the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Act 1953, the Minister of Agriculture hereby gives the following notice.

1 Title
  • This notice may be cited as the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1971.

2 Approval
  • The Minister of Agriculture hereby approves of the schemes of training and examination submitted by the Examining Board of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated with the authority of the said Institute for the granting of—

    • (a) Certificates and Diplomas in Horticulture as set out in Schedule 1 hereto; and

    • (b) Certificates and Diplomas in Horticulture (Fruit) as set out in Schedule 2 hereto; and

    • (c) Certificates and Diplomas in Horticulture (Vegetable) as set out in Schedule 3 hereto; and

    • (d) Certificates and Diplomas in Horticulture (Nursery Management) as set out in Schedule 4 hereto.

3 Revocations
  • The Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 19541 is hereby revoked, and the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 19572 is hereby revoked so far as it relates to Schedules 1 and 2 thereto:

    Provided that the provisions of Schedule 2 to the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1954, and the provisions of the said Schedules to the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1957, shall continue to apply until the year 1973 to every candidate who was registered with the Institute before 1971 unless he elects to complete a Certificate or Diploma under the provisions of the Schedules to this notice:

    Provided also that, if any candidate following a course leading to a Diploma under the provisions of the aforementioned Schedules has not completed his Diploma before 1974, the Examining Board shall (subject to the authority of the Institute and the approval of the Minister of Agriculture) prescribe the course to be completed by that candidate in order to qualify for a Diploma.


Schedule 1
Scheme of training and examination of candidates for the National Certificate and National Diploma in Horticulture of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

1 In this scheme, unless the context otherwise requires,
  • Diploma means the National Diploma in Horticulture (N D H) granted by the Institute

    Examining Board means the Examining Board of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

    Institute means the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

    National Certificate means the National Certificate in Horticulture granted by the Institute.

Award of certificate and diploma
2
  • The Examining Board, acting for and on behalf of the Institute, may issue a National Certificate to a candidate who has passed all the subjects of the first-, second-, and 3rd-year examinations, and a Diploma to a candidate who has passed the Diploma Examination:

    Provided in each case that the candidate satisfies all the conditions prescribed by the Board for the appropriate examination.

Subjects of examinations
3
  • (1) The subjects for the National Certificate and the Diploma Examinations shall be:

    • 1. Horticultural Botany I.

    • 2. Plant Protection I.

    • 3. Soil Science I.

    • 4. Horticultural Practice I.

    • 5. Fruit Culture.

    • 6. Plant Protection II.

    • 7. Soil Science II.

    • 8. Vegetable Culture.

    • 9. Oral and Practical Examination I.

    • 10. Horticultural Botany II (Classification).

    • 11. Horticultural Practice II.

    • 12. Ornamental Horticulture.

    • 13. Horticultural Machinery and Structures.

    • 14. Oral and Practical Examination II.

    • 15. Horticultural Botany III.

    • 16. Plant Protection III.

    • 17. Landscaping.

    • 18. Horticultural Engineering.

    • 19. Horticultural Management and Administration.

    • 20. Special Subject.

    • 21. Oral and Practical Examination III.

    • 22. Thesis.

    (2) The subjects in groups 1-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-18, and 19-22 shall represent 1 year's study for each group.

    (3) The oral and practical examinations will be combined, and will be designed to test the candidate's practical ability in horticulture and his appreciation and understanding of horticultural operations.

General requirements
4
  • Before being eligible to qualify for the Certificate or the Diploma of the Institute, a candidate shall comply with the following conditions:

    • (a) He shall apply to the Institute for registration and submit evidence that he has obtained or is obtaining appropriate practical experience:

      Provided that no registration shall be effective before the first day of January nearest the candidate's sixteenth birthday:

    • (b) He shall, on registration, furnish evidence that he has completed a course in Form V or has a qualification which the Examining Board accepts as an equivalent or higher qualification; or he shall satisfy the Examining Board that he is competent to proceed with the examinations of the Institute:

    • (c) He shall submit for the approval of the Examining Board on such occasions as it may require an account, in the form of a diary, of the work in which he has been engaged, and of such other matters of horticultural interest as have engaged his attention:

      Provided that, if the Examining Board considers that the diary submitted by the candidate is not satisfactory, it may require the candidate to modify and re-submit the diary:

    • (d) He shall satisfy the Examining Board that he has had appropriate practical experience in horticulture for the period prescribed for the examination concerned (hereafter in this scheme referred to as practical experience).

Equivalent status
5
  • For the purpose of the award of a Certificate or a Diploma the Examining Board may, in its discretion,

    • (a) Accept a pass in an equivalent or higher examination held by some competent public authority as equivalent to a pass in the corresponding or a lower examination of the Institute; or accept a pass in 1 or more subjects of such an examination as equivalent to a pass in 1 or more corresponding subjects of the Institute's examinations:

    • (b) Waive any of the conditions of the examination, including the period of practical experience, if the Examining Board is satisfied that substantially equivalent conditions have been complied with by the candidate:

    • (c) Adopt a system of cross-crediting whereby a candidate, having obtained a pass in any subject in the Schemes of Examinations held under the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notices numbers 1954/207, 1957/149, 1961/122, and 1968/122, may be credited with a pass in any 1 or more corresponding subjects examined under this scheme.

Conduct of examinations
6
  • (1) The examinations for the Institute's Certificate and Diploma shall be held in the month of November in each year at such centres as may be recognised by the Examining Board from year to year as suitable and necessary:

    Provided that oral and practical examinations may be held at times and places specified by the Examining Board.

    (2) Every candidate for an examination shall, not later than the 31st day of July preceding the examination, give notice in such manner as the Examining Board may determine, of his intention to sit the examination.

Examination fee.
7
  • Every candidate for examination in respect of examinations conducted by the Institute shall pay to the Institute the fee which the Board may prescribe for each subject.

Further requirements
8
  • (1) One or more subjects may be taken at a time, and a candidate may be credited with a pass in 1 or more subjects.

    (2) The award of the National Certificate will not be made until the candidate has passed in all subjects numbers 1-14 in clause 3(1) of this scheme, and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had 3 years' appropriate practical experience.

    (3) The subjects (numbers 1-4) Horticultural Botany I, Plant Protection I, Soil Science I, and Horticultural Practice I may be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate or at any subsequent examination:

    Provided that they shall not be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate if the registration was effected later than the 31st day of May in the year in which the examinations are held.

    (4) A candidate shall observe the following provisions as to order of subjects:

    • (a) A candidate shall not take a second or third stage of a subject until he has passed the previous stage of that subject:

    • (b) Except with the consent of the Examining Board, a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the third-year group (numbers 10-14) until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects of the first year group (numbers 1-4) of clause 3(1) of this scheme:

    • (c) Except with the consent of the Examining Board, a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the fourth- and fifth-year groups numbers 15-22 until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects numbers 1-14 of clause 3(1) of this scheme

    (5) The Oral and Practical Examination I shall not be taken until the candidate has passed not fewer than 3 of the subjects of the first year (numbers 1-4) and has at least 2 years' practical experience. The Oral and Practical Examination II shall not be taken until the candidate has at least 3 years' appropriate practical experience. The Oral and Practical Examination III shall not be taken until the candidate has at least 5 years' appropriate practical experience.

    (6) A pass in the Diploma Examination shall not be awarded until the candidate has passed all the subjects of that examination, and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had 2 years' appropriate practical experience after being awarded the National Certificate or has had not less than 5 years in all of such experience, as may be accepted by the Examining Board.

    (7) Where the required period of practical experience will end not later than the 31st day of May in any year it may be assumed, but only for the purpose of entering for an examination, to have ended on the 31st day of October of the preceding year if the candidate undertakes to continue in his employment until the required period of practical experience is completed.

    (8) The candidate shall be free to suggest any topic not listed for Special Subject, but prior approval of the Examining Board must be received before the candidate may proceed with the topic. The topic, whether selected from the prescribed list or otherwise chosen by the candidate, must be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 31st day of October in the year before the examination. The Examining Board may appoint, for the candidate, a consultant who will define the objectives and outline a study course for the selected area of specialisation referred to in this subclause (8).

    (9) The following provisions shall apply to the thesis for the Diploma:

    • (a) The thesis for the Diploma shall be submitted to the Examining Board not sooner than the August following the passing of all but one of the subjects numbered 15-18 in clause 3(1) of this scheme:

    • (b) The thesis, together with a statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 30th day of September in the year of examination.

    (10) The Diploma may be awarded With Distinction, this being determined on the candidate's performance in all phases of the course, including the thesis. In the consideration of the Award, greater emphasis will be placed on the results obtained in the later years of the Diploma course.

    (11) Notwithstanding anything hereinbefore provided, in the event of any candidate producing to the Examining Board evidence, in such form as it shall consider sufficient, of his intention to leave New Zealand for the purpose of pursuing his horticultural studies, the Examining Board may approve of the candidate presenting himself for the examination for the National Certificate, or for the Diploma, although his practical experience is 1 year less than that prescribed at that stage for the Certificate or Diploma for which he desires to sit. If in any such case the candidate passes the examination, he shall be provisionally recognised as having done so, but the appropriate Certificate or Diploma shall not be issued until he produces satisfactory evidence of the completion by him of the required period of practical experience.

Thesis
9
  • Every candidate for the Diploma shall submit a thesis dealing concisely with a selected aspect, or with some portion of a selected aspect, of horticulture, to be chosen by the candidate and approved by the Examining Board. The candidate's choice of subject shall be submitted for the approval of the Examining Board not less than 8 months before the date of the examination. In the thesis the candidate shall describe some work actually carried out by him. The Examining Board will appoint an adviser whom the candidate may consult at any time regarding his thesis material and who may suggest to the candidate appropriate approaches to his work and in the presentation of his material. The credit to be assigned to the thesis shall depend upon the evidence afforded of ability to summarise previous knowledge, to carry out good practical work, where applicable, to make independent observations, and to present the results satisfactorily. Two copies of the thesis, together with statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board in accordance with clause 8(9) of this Scheme. The Examining Board shall examine the thesis, and decide whether it is satisfactory. One copy of the thesis shall be returned to the candidate as soon as the decision of the Examining Board is made. The top copy shall be deposited in a library determined by the Examining Board. The thesis must be permanently bound within a cover, so that sheets cannot be lost or displaced.

Prescriptions of subjects
10
  • The prescriptions in the subjects of the examinations shall be as follows:

    (1) Horticultural Botany I

    The plant and its environment—introductory ecological aspects.

    Morphology and anatomy of the seed plant (cell, tissues, organs—roots, stems, leaves).

    Life forms (annual, biennial, perennial—evergreen, deciduous, herbaceous, woody).

    Flower, fruit, seed, germination.

    Methods of reproduction (asexual, sexual, introduction to inheritance).

    Plant naming. Botanical nomenclature and elementary classification.

    The lower plants—brief coverage—general aspects, life cycles.

    (2) Plant Protection I

    An elementary knowledge of pests and diseases of plants.

    Attention is to be given to biological, cultural, and chemical control. This will include a brief knowledge of the identification of important pests and diseases and the safe use of the more common therapeutants

    A general knowledge of the principles of plant quarantine and their application in New Zealand.

    (3) Soil Science I

    Soil formation; soil forming factors; soil development; physical properties; chemical properties; soil organic matter; biological properties.

    (4) Horticultural Practice I

    An introduction to horticulture, what it is and common terms used; tools commonly used, use of simple machinery; general safety precautions; principles of pruning; basic principles of simple propagation, seed sowing, pricking out, simple vegetative propagation, eg, cuttings, layering, division, etc.

    (5) Fruit Culture

    Culture of main fruits, pip, stone, berry, bush, citrus, and sub-tropical, including choice of stock and varieties, pruning, manuring, thinning, and spraying. (Not to be purely commercial fruit culture.)

    (6) Plant Protection II

    Herbicides and their uses. Weed control.

    The formulation of herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides including acaricides, nematocides, and bactericides and their uses and legislation governing their use.

    (7) Soil Science II

    Soils of New Zealand; study of soils in the field; soil fertility; drainage; irrigation; tillage operation; fertilisers; soil testing; soil conservation.

    (8) Vegetable Culture

    Culture, harvesting, and storage of all kinds of vegetable crops; crop rotation. (Not to be purely market gardening.)

    (9) Oral and Practical Examination I (1 day)

    The care and use of garden tools and implements, including those motor driven; the care and use of glasshouse equipment. Common horticultural operations, for example, preparation of potting composts, seed sowing, pricking out of seedlings, hardening off, potting up and potting on, care of glasshouse plants, digging and other forms of cultivation, lining out, planting and wrenching, preparation of seed beds, staking and tying of plants; identification of common pests and diseases, and their control; identification, origin, and proper use of commoner trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants, including plants indigenous to New Zealand and amenable to cultivation; identification of weeds; elementary vegetable culture. (Diary to be submitted at examination time. In marginal cases the diary may determine whether or not a candidate gains a pass.)

    (10) Horticultural Botany II (Classification)

    Systematic botany and taxonomy, elementary knowledge of codes of nomenclature. Identification of plants, use of simple keys. Division of the plant kingdom, e.g., bacteria, algae, fungi, mosses, liverworts, ferns, gymnosperms, monocotyledons, dicotyledons. An elementary knowledge of basic plant families. (In each case the candidate will be expected to know the general characters of the family, to have studied closely 1 or 2 examples, and to be able to refer to some of the more important genera and species cultivated in gardens. Examiners will bear in mind that the same examples may not be familiar in all districts. Candidates will not be expected to know in infinite detail all of the characters of each family, but rather those which would enable them as horticulturists to recognise certain family characters.)

    Coniferae3 RosaceaeLabiatae
    Gramineae3 LeguminosaeSolanaceae
    3 LiliaceaeMyrtaceaeScrophulariaceae
    CruciferaeUmbelliferaeCompositae

    In addition, students will be expected to have some knowledge of the following families:

     AmaryllidaceaeMalvaceae
     IridaceaeAraliaceae
     RanunculaceaeRutaceae
     EricaceaeAraceae
     ProteaceaeZingiberaceae

    (11) Horticultural Practice II

    Elementary surveying and levelling, equipment, and methods, for determining areas, levels, and grades; various types of propagation and the conditions necessary for each type; selection and use of stocks; soil mixtures for seed sowing and potting; glasshouse management; use and types of shelter and their effect on growth and yield; weed control; foremanship and the organisation of labour.

    (12) Ornamental Horticulture

    Practices of pruning trees and shrubs and elementary tree surgery; planting of trees and shrubs and subsequent management; a general knowledge of those commonly used for ornament, forestry, hedge, and shelter purposes; lifting and transport of trees and shrubs from one site to another; the provision of seasonal displays; the use and cultivation of annual, biennial, and perennial plants; the preparation, planting, and maintenance of lawns; the cultivation of ornamental plants under glass.

    (13) Horticultural Machinery and Structures

    Choice, use, and maintenance of machines and equipment; design and construction of glasshouses, shade houses, and frames; glasshouse heating and ventilation; mist propagating units, capillary and other methods of glasshouse irrigation.

    (14) Oral and Practical Examination II (1 day)—A more advanced knowledge of subject 9 is assumed.

    Propagation of plants by budding, grafting, inarching, aerial layering, leaf cuttings, and the more difficult types of cuttings; also different types of stocks. Pruning and planting trees and shrubs, hedges, and shelter, and times of pruning. Lawns—preparation, sowing, turfing, and maintenance. Types of glasshouse construction and heating. Types and construction of shade houses and frames. Identification of pests and diseases and their control. Identification of plants, botanical and common names, family, origin, methods of propagation and use in horticulture. The culture of fruit crops. Identification and control of common weeds. Seasonal displays both outdoors and under glass. Simple methods of determining areas, grades, and levels. (Diary to be submitted at examination time. In marginal cases the diary may determine whether or not a candidate gains a pass.)

    (15) Horticultural Botany III

    More advanced physiology, plant ecology, the relationship of environment to plants, including the influence of soils, water, light, temperature, wind, the chief resultant plant formations in New Zealand and their horticultural significance; the garden as a plant community; genetics and plant breeding; photoperiodism and its effect on cropping; hormonal control of plant growth, and the principles involved in the practical application of growth substances.

    (16) Plant Protection III

    The control of plant pests and diseases involving a knowledge of ecology, life histories, host parasite relationships. Pest and disease forecasting. Soil borne and seed borne pests and diseases and their control. Pests and diseases of glasshouse crops and their control. Spray schedules used for the main fruit and vegetable crops and in nursery and ornamental horticulture including crops under glass.

    (17) Landscaping

    History and principles of landscaping and garden design. Estimating and specifications for various features including retaining and ornamental walls, ponds, rock gardens, paved areas, and steps.

    (18) Horticultural Engineering

    Drainage and irrigation, methods and equipment used, planning, lay out under various conditions; construction and layout of buildings, roads, pathways; water supplies, pumps, pipe friction, soil heating equipment; an advanced knowledge of methods of glasshouse heating, ventilating, and cooling.

    (19) Horticultural Management and Administration

    Keeping of receipts and payments, records, revenue and expenditure accounts; wages, banking and insurance procedures; labour organisation and management; commercial and other laws affecting horticulture; financial management and control of horticultural units; annual and development budgeting necessary for the efficient management of such units.

    (20) Special Subject

    Selected from:

    • (a) Ornamental and Recreational Horticulture.

    • (b) Nursery Management.

    • (c) Commercial Floriculture.

    • (d) Fruit Growing.

    • (e) Vegetable Production.

    • (f) Some other approved topic (see clause 8(8) of this scheme).

    (21) Oral and Practical Examination III (1 day)—A more advanced knowledge of subjects 9 and 14 is assumed.

    Instruments and equipment used in mapping, surveying, and levelling, their use and care. A knowledge of methods employed and preparation of estimates for constructional work, e.g., the cut and fill required to level a given area, the amount of material required for a specified path, road, wall, etc. Drainage; types of drainage, grades and falls, methods employed, equipment and materials used.

    Tree surgery and pruning of specimen trees and all types of trees and shrubs. Preparing and packing flowers and nursery stock for transit or market. Harvesting and storing seeds. Identification of plants: botanical and common names, family, origin, methods of propagation and use in horticulture. Identification of pests and diseases and sprays and spraying for control of plant diseases and pests. Identification of weeds and their control. The candidate shall submit a plan (his own work) of a garden, park, or nursery for discussion on planting, design, and layout. The quality of the workmanship to be examined.

    (22) Thesis

    As prescribed in clause 9 of this scheme.


Schedule 2
Scheme of training and examination of candidates for the National Certificate and National Diploma in Horticulture (fruit) of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

1
  • (1) In this scheme, unless the context otherwise requires,—

    Diploma means the National Diploma in Horticulture (Fruit) N.D.H. (Fruit) granted by the Institute

    Examining Board means the Examining Board of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

    Institute means the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

    National Certificate means the National Certificate in Horticulture (Fruit) granted by the Institute

    Orchard means any commercial or semi-commercial horticultural holding producing pip, stone, citrus, sub-tropical, or berry fruits.

    (2) Subject to the provisions of subclause (1) of this clause, unless the context otherwise requires, terms defined in the scheme of training and examination of candidates for the National Certificate and National Diploma in Horticulture shall, when used in this scheme, have the meanings assigned to them in that scheme.

Award of certificate and diploma
2
  • The Examining Board, acting for and on behalf of the Institute may issue a National Certificate to a candidate who has passed all the subjects of the first-, second-, and third-year examinations, and a Diploma to a candidate who has passed the Diploma Examination:

    Provided in each case that the candidate satisfies all the conditions prescribed by the Board for the appropriate examination.

Subjects of examination
3
  • (1) The subjects for the National Certificate and the Diploma Examination shall be:

    • 1. Horticultural Botany I.

    • 2. Plant Protection I.

    • 3. Soil Science I.

    • 4. Horticultural techniques.

    • 5. Horticultural Botany II.

    • 6. Plant Protection II.

    • 7. Soil Science II.

    • 8. Fruit Production I.

    • 9. Oral and Practical Examination I.

    • 10. Fruit Crop Botany.

    • 11. Plant Protection III.

    • 12. Fruit Production II.

    • 13. Horticultural Machinery and Structures

    • 14. Oral and Practical Examination II.

    • 15. Fruit Production III.

    • 16. Horticultural Management.

    • 17. Special Subject I.

    • 18. Special Subject II.

    • 19. Thesis.

    (2) The subjects in groups 1-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-18, and 19 shall represent 1 year's study for each group.

    (3) The oral and practical examinations will be combined and will be designed to test the candidate's appreciation and understanding of operations and activities normally carried out on a commercial horticultural holding producing fruit.

General requirements
4
  • Before being eligible to qualify for the Certificate or the Diploma of the Institute, a candidate shall comply with the following conditions:

    • (a) (a) He shall apply to the Institute for registration and submit evidence that he has obtained or is obtaining appropriate practical experience:

      Provided that no registration shall be effective before the first day of January nearest the candidate's sixteenth birthday:

    • (b) He shall, on registration, furnish evidence that he has completed a course in Form V or has a qualification which the Examining Board accepts as an equivalent or higher qualification; or he shall satisfy the Examining Board that he is competent to proceed with the examinations of the Institute:

    • (c) He shall submit for the approval of the Examining Board on such occasions as it may require an account, in the form of a diary, of the work in which he has been engaged, and of such other matters of horticultural interest as have engaged his attention:

      Provided that, if the Examining Board considers that the diary submitted by the candidate is not satisfactory, it may require the candidate to modify and re-submit the diary:

    • (d) He shall satisfy the Examining Board that he has had appropriate practical experience, mainly in fruit production, for the period prescribed for the examination concerned (hereafter in this scheme referred to as practical experience).

Equivalent status
5
  • For the purpose of the award of a Certificate or a Diploma the Examining Board may, in its discretion,—

    • (a) Accept a pass in an equivalent or higher examination held by some competent public authority as equivalent to a pass in the corresponding or a lower examination of the Institute; or accept a pass in 1 or more subjects of such an examination as equivalent to a pass in 1 or more corresponding subjects of the Institute's examinations:

    • (b) Waive any of the conditions of the examination including the period of practical experience, if the Examining Board is satisfied that substantially equivalent conditions have been complied with by the candidate:

    • (c) Adopt a system of cross-crediting whereby a candidate, having obtained a pass in any subject in the Schemes of Examinations held under the Royal. New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notices numbers 1954/207, 1957/149, 1961/122, and 1968/122, may be credited with a pass in any 1 or more corresponding subjects examined under this scheme.

Conduct of examinations
6
  • (1) The examinations for the Institute's Certificate and Diploma shall be held in the month of November in each year at such centres as may be recognised by the Examining Board from year to year as suitable and necessary:

    Provided that oral and practical examinations may be held at times and places specified by the Examining Board.

    (2) Every candidate for an examination shall, not later than the 31st day of July preceding the examination, give notice in such manner as the Examining Board may determine, of his intention to sit the examination.

Examination fees
7
  • Every candidate for examination in respect of examinations conducted by the Institute shall pay to the Institute the fee which the Board may prescribe for each subject.

Further requirements
8
  • (1) One or more subjects may be taken at a time, and a candidate may be credited with a pass in 1 or more subjects.

    (2) The award of the National Certificate will not be made until the candidate has passed in all subjects numbers 1-14 in clause 3(1) of this scheme and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had 3 years' appropriate practical experience.

    (3) The subjects (numbers 1) Horticultural Botany I, Plant Protection I, Soil Science I, and Horticultural Techniques may be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate or at any subsequent examination:

    Provided that they shall not be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate if the registration was effected later than the 31st day of May in the year in which the examinations are held.

    (4) A candidate shall observe the following provisions as to order of subjects:

    • (a) A candidate shall not take a second or third stage of a subject until he has passed the previous stage of that subject:

    • (b) Except with the consent of the Examining Board a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the third-year group (numbers 1-14) until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects of the first-year group (numbers 1-14) of clause 3(1) of this scheme:

    • (c) Except with the consent of the Examining Board a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the fourth- and fifth-year groups numbers 15-19 until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects numbers 1-14 of clause 3(1) of this scheme

    (5) The Oral and Practical Examination I and the subject Fruit Production I shall not be taken until the candidate has passed not fewer than 3 of the subjects of the first year (numbers 1-4) and has at least 2 years' practical experience. The Oral and Practical Examination II shall not be taken until the candidate has at least 3 years' appropriate practical experience.

    (6) A pass in the Diploma Examination shall not be awarded until the candidate has passed all the subjects of that examination, and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had 2 years' appropriate practical experience after being awarded the National Certificate or has had not less than 5 years in all of such experience, as may be accepted by the Examining Board.

    (7) Where the required period of practical experience will end not later than the 31st day of May in any year it may be assumed, but only for the purpose of entering for an examination, to have ended on the 31st day of October of the preceding year if the candidate undertakes to continue in his employment until the required period of practical experience is completed.

    (8) The candidate shall be free to suggest any topic not listed for Special Subjects I and II within the objectives of each of these, but prior approval of the Examining Board must be received before the candidate may proceed with the topic. The topic, whether selected from the prescribed list or otherwise chosen by the candidate, must be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 31st day of October in the year before the examination. The Examining Board may appoint, for the candidate, a consultant who will define the objectives and outline a study course for the selected area of specialisation referred to in this subclause (8).

    (9) The following provisions shall apply to the thesis for the Diploma:

    • (a) The thesis for the Diploma shall be submitted to the Examining Board not sooner than the August following the passing of all but 1 of the subjects numbered 15-18 in clause 3(1) of this scheme:

    • (b) The thesis, together with a statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 30th day of September in the year of examination.

    (10) The Diploma may be awarded With Distinction, this being determined on the candidate's performance in all phases of the course, including the thesis. In the consideration of the award, greater emphasis will be placed on the results obtained in the later years of the Diploma course.

    (11) Notwithstanding anything hereinbefore provided, in the event of any candidate producing to the Examining Board evidence, in such form as it shall consider sufficient, of his intention to leave New Zealand for the purpose of pursuing his horticultural studies, the Examining Board may approve of the candidate presenting himself for the examination for the National Certificate, or for the Diploma, although his practical experience is 1 year less than that prescribed at that stage for the Certificate or Diploma for which he desires to sit. If in any such case the candidate passes the examination, he shall be provisionally recognised as having done so, but the appropriate Certificate or Diploma shall not be issued until he produces satisfactory evidence of the completion by him of the required period of practical experience.

Thesis
9
  • Every candidate for the Diploma shall submit a thesis dealing concisely with a selected aspect, or with some portion of a selected aspect of fruit production to be chosen by the candidate, and approved by the Examining Board. The candidate's choice of subject shall be submitted for the approval of the Examining Board not less than 8 months before the date of the examination. In the thesis the candidate shall describe some work actually carried out by him. The Examining Board will appoint an adviser whom the candidate may consult at any time regarding his thesis material and who may suggest to the candidate appropriate approaches to his work and in the presentation of his material. The credit to be assigned to the thesis shall depend upon the evidence afforded of ability to summarise previous knowledge, to carry out good practical work, where applicable, to make independent observations, and to present the results satisfactorily. Two copies of the thesis, together with a statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board in accordance with clause 8(9) of this scheme. The Examining Board shall examine the thesis, and decide whether it is satisfactory. One copy of the thesis shall be returned to the candidate as soon as the decision of the Examining Board is made. The top copy shall be deposited in a library determined by the Examining Board. The thesis must be permanently bound within a cover, so that sheets cannot be lost or displaced.

Prescriptions of subjects
10
  • The prescriptions in the subjects of the examinations shall be as follows:

    (1) Horticultural Botany I

    The plant and its environment—introductory ecological aspects.

    Morphology and anatomy of the seed plant (cells, tissues, organs—roots, stems, leaves).

    Life forms (annual, biennial, perennial—evergreen, deciduous, herbaceous, woody).

    Flower, fruit, seed, germination.

    Methods of reproduction (asexual, sexual, introduction to inheritance).

    Plant naming. Botanical nomenclature and elementary classification.

    The lower plants—brief coverage—general aspects, life cycles.

    (2) Plant Protection I

    An elementary knowledge of pests and diseases of plants.

    Attention is to be given to biological, cultural, and chemical control. This will include a brief knowledge of the identification of important pests and diseases and the safe use of the more common therapeutants.

    A general knowledge of the principles of plant quarantine and their application in New Zealand.

    (3) Soil Science I

    Soil formation; soil forming factors; soil development; physical properties; chemical properties; soil organic matter; biological properties.

    (4) Horticultural Techniques

    Review of the scope and location of ornamental horticulture and commercial horticultural industries.

    Horticultural and botanical terms.

    Propagation of plants from seed and vegetatively.

    Preparation of soil or growing medium.

    Techniques of raising horticultural plants from seed.

    Techniques of raising horticultural plants vegetatively.

    The culture of horticultural plants, outdoors and under protection.

    Harvesting, marketing, or use of horticultural plants (for market, process, or ornament).

    Equipment, labour, organisation, and records in horticultural practice.

    (5) Horticultural Botany II

    Plant physiology.

    Plant maintenance—photosynthesis, digestion, respiration, transport, water, and salt uptake.

    Growth and development—related to vegetative and reproductive growth.

    Flower and fruit development. Internal factors—hormones, dormancy, re-distribution of nutrients, storage and utilisation of reserves.

    External factors—light, temperature, water, photoperiodism, vernalisation, mineral nutrition.

    (6) Plant Protection II

    Herbicides and their uses. Weed control.

    The formulation of herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides, including acaricides, nematocides, and bactericides and their uses and legislation governing their use.

    (7) Soil Science II

    Soils of New Zealand; study of soils in the field; soil fertility; drainage; irrigation; tillage operation; fertilisers; soil testing; soil conservation.

    (8) Fruit Production I

    Areas of production in New Zealand; trends in the industry; relationship of production to locality and potential markets; selection of crop land, layout, relationship to capital; the influence of rootstocks on crop production; the initial management of the holding.

    (9) Oral and Practical Examination I

    The student will be questioned about the operations carried out in an orchard, and may be asked to demonstrate the techniques used. (Dairy to be submitted at examination time. In marginal cases the diary may determine whether or not the candidate gains a pass.)

    (10) Fruit Crop Botany

    Crop ecology and control of environment; applied plant physiology with particular emphasis on growth substances, nutrition, apical dominance, pruning, control of flowering; genetics and plant breeding; pollination; identification of weeds and weed biology; interaction of factors affecting yield.

    (11) Plant Protection III

    The control of plant pests and diseases involving a knowledge of ecology, life histories, host parasite relationships. Pest and disease forecasting. Soil borne and seed borne pests and diseases and their control. Pests and diseases of glasshouse crops and their control. Spray schedules used for the main fruit and vegetable crops and in nursery and ornamental horticulture including crops under glass.

    (12) Fruit Production II

    The production, harvesting, and marketing of major types of pip, stone, and berry fruits, grapes, citrus, and other sub-tropical fruits.

    (13) Horticultural Machinery and Structures

    Tractors, rotary hoes, and their implements.

    Spraying, irrigation, and mowing machinery.

    Construction, use, and maintenance of equipment.

    The design, construction, and operation of grading, packing, and storage buildings, and associated equipment.

    Harvesting aids.

    Precautions in using electricity.

    (14) Oral and Practical Examination II

    A more advanced treatment of the operations than in Oral and Practical Examination I. Practical aspects of the formal subjects up to and including subjects of year III will be incorporated.

    (15) Fruit Production III

    Production management and interaction of factors affecting yield and quality in fruit crops, including berry fruits.

    (16) Horticultural Management

    Nature of management; the use of resources; budgeting; organisation and method; labour relations; elements of marketing; records; legislation.

    (17) Special Subject I

    Selected from the following or other approved topic (see clause 8(8) of this scheme):

    Apical dominance; drainage; irrigation; weed control; specific disease control; propagation; rootstocks; spacing; pruning; training methods; mineral nutrition; harvesting; mechanical aids for harvesting; storage; post-harvest treatment of fruit; packaging and presentation

    (18) Special Subject II

    A detailed consideration of the production, harvesting, packing, and marketing of a specific fruit crop such as apple, apricot, avocado, Chinese gooseberry, citrus, grapes, passion fruit, peach, pear, plum, strawberries, tamarillos, cane or bush fruit.

    (19) Thesis

    As prescribed in clause 9 of this scheme.


Schedule 3
Scheme of training and examination of candidates for the National Certificate and National Diploma in Horticulture (vegetable) of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

1
  • (1) In this scheme, unless the context otherwise requires,—

    Diploma means the National Diploma in Horticulture (Vegetable) N.D.H. (Vegetable) granted by the Institute

    National Certificate means the National Certificate in Horticulture (Vegetable) granted by the Institute

    Vegetable and glasshouse crop production or either refers to activities on any commercial or semi-commercial holding producing vegetables or berry fruit for the fresh or process markets either outdoors or under glass

    Institute means the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

    Examining Board means the Examining Board of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated.

    (2) Subject to the provisions of subclause (1) of this clause, unless the context otherwise requires, terms defined in the scheme of training and examination of candidates for the National Certificate and National Diploma in Horticulture shall, when used in this scheme, have the meanings assigned to them in that scheme.

Award of certificate and diploma
2
  • The Examining Board, acting for and on behalf of the Institute, may issue a National Certificate to a candidate who has passed all the subjects of the first-, second-, and third-year examinations, and a Diploma to a candidate who has passed the Diploma Examination:

    Provided in each case that the candidate satisfies all the conditions prescribed by the Board for the appropriate examination.

Subjects of examination
3
  • (1) The subjects for the National Certificate and the Diploma Examination shall be:

    • 1. Horticultural Botany I.

    • 2. Plant Protection I.

    • 3. Soil Science I.

    • 4. Horticultural Techniques.

    • 5. Horticultural Botany II.

    • 6. Plant Protection II.

    • 7. Soil Science II.

    • 8. Vegetable Production I.

    • 9. Oral and Practical Examination I.

    • 10. Vegetable Crop Botany.

    • 11. Plant Protection III.

    • 12. Vegetable Production II.

    • 13. Horticultural Machinery and Structures.

    • 14. Oral and Practical Examination II.

    • 15. Vegetable Production III.

    • 16. Horticultural Management.

    • 17. Special Subject I.

    • 18. Special Subject II.

    • 19. Thesis.

    (2) The subjects in groups 1-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-18, and 19 shall represent 1 year's study for each group.

    (3) The oral and practical examinations will be combined and will be designed to test the candidate's appreciation and understanding of operations and activities normally carried out on a commercial horticultural holding producing vegetables and berry fruit.

General requirements
4
  • Before being eligible to qualify for the Certificate or the Diploma of the Institute, a candidate shall comply with the following conditions:

    • (a) He shall apply to the Institute for registration and submit evidence that he has obtained or is obtaining appropriate practical experience:

      Provided that no registration shall be effective before the first day of January nearest the candidate's sixteenth birthday:

    • (b) He shall, on registration, furnish evidence that he has completed a course in Form V or has a qualification which the Examining Board accepts as an equivalent or higher qualification; or he shall satisfy the Examining Board that he is competent to proceed with the examinations of the Institute:

    • (c) He shall submit for the approval of the Examining Board on such occasions as it may require an account, in the form of a diary, of the work in which he has been engaged, and of such other matters of horticultural interest as have engaged his attention:

      Provided that, if the Examining Board considers that the diary submitted by the candidate is not satisfactory, it may require the candidate to modify and re-submit the diary:

    • (d) He shall satisfy the Examining Board that he has had appropriate practical experience mainly in vegetable and glasshouse crop production or either for the period prescribed for the examination concerned (hereafter in this Schedule referred to as practical experience).

Equivalent status
5
  • For the purpose of the award of a Certificate or a Diploma the Examining Board may, in its discretion,—

    • (a) Accept a pass in an equivalent or higher examination held by some competent public authority as equivalent to a pass in the corresponding or a lower examination of the Institute; or accept a pass in 1 or more subjects of such an examination as equivalent to a pass in 1 or more corresponding subjects of the Institute's examinations:

    • (b) Waive any of the conditions of the examination, including the period of practical experience, if the Examining Board is satisfied that substantially equivalent conditions have been complied with by the candidate:

    • (c) Adopt a system of cross-crediting whereby a candidate, having obtained a pass in any subject in the Schemes of Examinations held under the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notices numbers 1954/207, 1957/149, 1961/122, and 1968/122, may be credited with a pass in any 1 or more corresponding subjects examined under this scheme.

Conduct of examinations
6
  • (1) The examinations for the Institute's Certificate and Diploma shall be held in the month of November in each year at such centres as may be recognised by the Examining Board from year to year as suitable and necessary:

    Provided that oral and practical examinations may be held at times and places specified by the Examining Board.

    (2) Every candidate for an examination shall, not later than the 31st day of July preceding the examination, give notice in such manner as the Examining Board may determine, of his intention to sit the examination.

Examination fees
7
  • Every candidate for examination in respect of examinations conducted by the Institute shall pay to the Institute the fee which the Board may prescribe for each subject.

Further requirements
8
  • (1) One or more subjects may be taken at a time, and a candidate may be credited with a pass in 1 or more subjects.

    (2) The award of the National Certificate will not be made until the candidate has passed in all subjects numbers 1-14 in clause 3(1) of this scheme, and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had 3 years' appropriate practical experience.

    (3) The subjects (numbers 1-4) Horticultural Botany I, Plant Protection I, Soil Science I, and Horticultural Techniques may be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate or at any subsequent examination:

    Provided that they shall not be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate if the registration was effected later than the 31st day of May in the year in which the examinations are held.

    (4) A candidate shall observe the following provisions as to order of subjects.

    • (a) A candidate shall not take a second or third stage of a subject until he has passed the previous stage of that subject:

    • (b) Except with the consent of the Examining Board, a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the third-year group (numbers 10-14) until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects of the first-year group (numbers 1-4) of clause 3(1) of this scheme.

    • (c) Except with the consent of the Examining Board, a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the fourth- and fifth-year groups numbers 15-19 until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects numbers 1-14 of clause 3(1) of this scheme.

    (5) The Oral and Practical Examination I and the subject Vegetable Production I shall not be taken until the candidate has passed not fewer than 3 of the subjects of the first year (numbers 1-4) and has at least 2 years' practical experience. The Oral and Practical Examination II shall not be taken until the candidate has at least 3 years' appropriate practical experience.

    (6) A pass in the Diploma Examination shall not be awarded until the candidate has passed all the subjects of that examination, and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had 2 years' appropriate practical experience after being awarded the National Certificate or has had not less than 5 years in all of such experience, as may be accepted by the Examining Board.

    (7) Where the required period of practical experience will end not later than the 31st day of May in any year it may be assumed, but only for the purpose of entering for an examination, to have ended on the 31st day of October of the preceding year if the candidate undertakes to continue in his employment until the required period of practical experience is completed.

    (8) The candidate shall be free to suggest any topic not listed for Special Subjects I and II within the objectives of each of these, but prior approval of the Examining Board must be received before the candidate may proceed with the topic. The topic, whether selected from the prescribed list or otherwise chosen by the candidate, must be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 31st day of October in the year before the examination. The Examining Board may appoint, for the candidate, a consultant who will define the objectives and outline a study course for the selected area of specialisation referred to in this clause (8).

    (9) The following provisions shall apply to the thesis for the Diploma:

    • (a) The thesis for the Diploma shall be submitted to the Examining Board not sooner than the August following the passing of all but one of the subjects numbered 15-18 in clause 3(1) of this scheme:

    • (b) The thesis, together with a statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 30th day of September in the year of examination.

    (10) The Diploma may be awarded With Distinction, this being determined on the candidate's performance in all phases of the course, including the thesis. In the consideration of the Award, greater emphasis will be placed on the results obtained in the later years of the Diploma course.

    (11) Notwithstanding anything hereinbefore provided, in the event of any candidate producing to the Examining Board evidence, in such form as it shall consider sufficient, of his intention to leave New Zealand for the purpose of pursuing his horticultural studies, the Examining Board may approve of the candidate presenting himself for the examination for the National Certificate, or for the Diploma, although his practical experience is 1 year less than that prescribed at that stage for the Certificate or Diploma for which he desires to sit. If in any such case the candidate passes the examination, he shall be provisionally recognised as having done so, but the appropriate Certificate or Diploma shall not be issued until he produces satisfactory evidence of the completion by him of the required period of practical experience.

Thesis
9
  • Every candidate for the Diploma shall submit a thesis dealing concisely with a selected aspect, or with some portion of a selected aspect of vegetable production, to be chosen by the candidate, and approved by the Examining Board. The candidate's choice of subject shall be submitted for the approval of the examining Board not less than 8 months before the date of the examination. In the thesis the candidate shall describe some work actually carried out by him. The Examining Board will appoint an adviser whom the candidate may consult at any time regarding his thesis material and who may suggest to the candidate appropriate approaches to his work and in the presentation of his material. The credit to be assigned to the thesis shall depend upon the evidence afforded of ability to summarise previous knowledge, to carry out good practical work, where applicable, to make independent observations and to present the results satisfactorily. Two copies of the thesis together with a statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board in accordance with clause 8(9) of this scheme. The Examining Board shall examine the thesis, and decide whether it is satisfactory. One copy of the thesis shall be returned to the candidate as soon as the decision of the Examining Board is made. The top copy shall be deposited in a library determined by the Examining Board. The thesis must be permanently bound within a cover, so that sheets cannot be lost or misplaced

Prescriptions of subjects
10
  • The prescriptions in the subjects of the examinations shall be as follows:

    (1) Horticultural Botany I

    The plant and its environment—introductory ecological aspects.

    Morphology and anatomy of the seed plant (cells, tissues, organs—roots, stems, leaves).

    Life forms (annual, biennial, perennial—evergreen, deciduous, herbaceous, woody).

    Flower, fruit, seed, germination.

    Methods of reproduction (asexual, sexual, introduction to inheritance).

    Plant naming. Botanical nomenclature and elementary classification.

    The lower plants—brief coverage—general aspects, life cycles.

    (2) Plant Protection I

    An elementary knowledge of pests and diseases of plants.

    Attention is to be given to biological, cultural, and chemical control. This will include a brief knowledge of the identification of important pests and diseases and the safe use of the more common therapeutants.

    A general knowledge of the principles of plant quarantine and their application in New Zealand.

    (3) Soil Science I

    Soil formation; soil forming factors; soil development; physical properties; chemical properties; soil organic matter; biological properties.

    (4) Horticultural Techniques

    Review of the scope and location of ornamental horticulture and commercial horticultural industries.

    Horticultural and botanical terms.

    Propagation of plants from seed and vegetatively.

    Preparation of soil or growing medium.

    Techniques of raising horticultural plants from seed.

    Techniques of raising horticultural plants vegetatively.

    The culture of horticultural plants, outdoors and under protection.

    Harvesting, marketing, or use of horticultural plants (for market, process, or ornament).

    Equipment, labour, organisation, and records in horticultural practice.

    (5) Horticultural Botany II

    Plant physiology.

    Plant maintenance—photosynthesis, digestion, respiration, transport, water, and salt uptake.

    Growth and development—related to vegetative and reproductive growth.

    Flower and fruit development. Internal factors—hormones, dormancy, redistribution of nutrients, storage and utilisation of reserves. External factors—light, temperature, water, photoperiodism, vernalisation, mineral nutrition.

    (6) Plant Protection II

    Herbicides and their uses. Weed control.

    The formulation of herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides, including acaricides, nematocides, and bacterioides and their uses and legislation governing their use.

    (7) Soil Science II

    Soils of New Zealand; study of soils in the field; soil fertility; drainage; irrigation; tillage operation; fertilisers; soil testing, soil conservation.

    (8) Vegetable Production I

    Areas of production in New Zealand; trends in the industry; relationship of production to locality and markets; selection of land, layout, relationship to capital, the glasshouse environment; management of the holding; more advanced methods of plant production.

    (9) Oral and Practical Examination I

    The student will be questioned about the operations carried out on a commercial horticultural holding producing vegetables and berry fruit and may be asked to demonstrate the techniques used. (Diary to be submitted at examination time. In marginal cases the diary may determine whether or not the candidate gains a pass.)

    (10) Vegetable Crop Botany

    Crop ecology and control of environment; applied plant physiology with particular emphasis on growth substances, nutrition, apical dominance, pruning, control of flowering; genetics and plant breeding; pollination, identification of weeds and weed biology; interaction of factors affecting yield.

    (11) Plant Protection III

    The control of plant pests and diseases involving a knowledge of ecology, life histories, host parasite relationships. Pest and disease forecasting. Soil borne and seed borne pests and diseases and their control.

    Pests and diseases of glasshouse crops and their control. Spray schedules used for the main fruit and vegetable crops and in nursery and ornamental horticulture including crops under glass.

    (12) Vegetable Production II

    The production, harvesting, storage, and marketing of major types of vegetables.

    (13) Horticultural Machinery and Structures

    Tractors, rotary hoes, and their implements.

    Spraying, irrigation, and heating equipment.

    Construction, use, and maintenance of equipment.

    Soil disinfection equipment.

    The design, construction, and methods of operation of glasshouses and equipment involved in automation.

    Machinery and structures for harvesting storage, and marketing.

    Elementary surveying.

    Precautions in using electricity.

    (14) Oral and Practical Examination II

    A more advanced treatment of the operations than in Oral and Practical Examination I. Practical aspects of the formal subjects up to and including subjects of year III will be incorporated.

    (15) Vegetable Production III

    Production management and interaction of factors affecting yield and quality of protected and outdoor vegetables and berry fruit crops. The production of crops for processing and seed; mushrooms.

    (16) Horticultural Management

    Nature of management; the use of resources; budgeting; organisation and method; labour relations; elements of marketing; records; legislation.

    (17) Special Subject I

    Selected from the following or other approved topic (see clause 8(8) of this scheme):

    Drainage; irrigation; plant breeding; weed control; harvesting techniques; spacing; seed treatment; propagation; storage; therapeutants; growth substances; mineral nutrition; straw bale culture; water economy in plants; dormancy; soil disinfection.

    (18) Special Subject II

    Detailed consideration of the production, harvesting, marketing and storage of a specific crop, such as Brassica, beans, celery, cucumbers, garlic, kumara, lettuce, mushrooms, onions, peas, peppers, sweet corn, tomatoes, black currants, boysenberries, loganberries, strawberries.

    (19) Thesis

    As prescribed in clause 9 of this scheme.


Schedule 4
Scheme of training and examination of candidates for the National Certificate and National Diploma in Horticulture (nursery management) of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

1
  • (1) In this scheme, unless the context otherwise requires,—

    Diploma means the National Diploma in Horticulture (Nursery Management) N.D.H. (Nursery Management) granted by the Institute

    Examining Board means the Examining Board of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

    Institute means the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Incorporated

    National Certificate means the National Certificate in Horticulture (Nursery Management) granted by the Institute

    Nursery refers to any commercial or semi-commercial horticultural holding producing hardwood, herbaceous, or indoor plants, seedlings, or bulbs.

    (2) Subject to the provisions of subclause (1) of this clause, unless the context otherwise requires, terms defined in the scheme of training and examination of candidates for the National Certificate and National Diploma in Horticulture shall, when used in this scheme, have the meanings assigned to them in that scheme.

Award of certificate and diploma
2
  • (1) The Examining Board, acting for and on behalf of the Institute, may issue a National Certificate to a candidate who has passed all the subjects of the first-, second-, and third-year examinations, and a Diploma to a candidate who has passed the Diploma Examination:

    Provided in each case that the candidate satisfies all the conditions prescribed by the Board for the appropriate examination.

Subjects of examination
3
  • (1) The subjects for the National Certificate and the Diploma Examination shall be:

    • 1. Horticultural Botany I.

    • 2. Plant Protection I.

    • 3. Soil Science I.

    • 4. Horticultural Techniques.

    • 5. Horticultural Botany II.

    • 6. Plant Protection II.

    • 7. Soil Science II.

    • 8. Nursery Production I.

    • 9. Oral and Practical Examination I.

    • 10. Nursery Crop Botany.

    • 11. Plant Protection III.

    • 12. Nursery Production II.

    • 13. Horticultural Machinery and Structures.

    • 14. Oral and Practical Examination II.

    • 15. Nursery Production III.

    • 16. Horticultural Management.

    • 17. Special Subject I.

    • 18. Special Subject II.

    • 19. Thesis.

    (2) The subjects in groups 1-4, 5-9, 1-14, 15-18, and 19 shall represent 1 year's study for each group.

    (3) The oral and practical examinations will be combined and will be designed to test the candidate's appreciation and understanding of operations and activities normally carried out on a commercial horticultural holding producing nursery stock.

General requirements
4
  • Before being eligible to qualify for the Certificate or the Diploma of the Institute, a candidate shall comply with the following conditions:

    • (a) He shall apply to the Institute for registration and submit evidence that he has obtained or is obtaining appropriate practical experience:

      Provided that no registration shall be effective before the first day of January nearest the candidate's sixteenth birthday:

    • (b) He shall, on registration, furnish evidence that he has completed a course in Form V or has a qualification which the Examining Board accepts as an equivalent or higher qualification; or he shall satisfy the Examining Board that he is competent to proceed with the examinations of the Institute:

    • (c) He shall submit for the approval of the Examining Board on such occasions as it may require an account, in the form of a diary, of the work in which he has been engaged, and of such other matters of horticultural interest as have engaged his attention:

      Provided that, if the Examining Board considers that the diary submitted by the candidate is not satisfactory, it may require the candidate to modify and re-submit the diary

    • (d) He shall satisfy the Examining Board that he has had appropriate practical experience mainly in a nursery for the period prescribed for the examination concerned (hereafter in this Schedule referred to as practical experience).

Equivalent status
5
  • For the purpose of the award of a Certificate or a Diploma the Examining Board may, in its discretion,—

    • (a) Accept a pass in an equivalent or higher examination held by some competent public authority as equivalent to a pass in the corresponding or a lower examination of the Institute; or accept a pass in 1 or more subjects of such an examination as equivalent to a pass in 1 or more corresponding subjects of the Institute's examinations:

    • (b) Waive any of the conditions of the examination including the period of practical experience, if the Examining Board is satisfied that substantially equivalent conditions have been complied with by the candidate:

    • (c) Adopt a system of cross-crediting whereby a candidate having obtained a pass in any subject in the Schemes of Examinations held under the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notices numbers 1954/207, 1957/149, 1961/122, and 1968/122 may be credited with a pass in any 1 or more corresponding subjects examined under this scheme.

Conduct of examinations
6
  • (1) The examinations for the Institute's Certificate and Diploma shall be held in the month of November in each year at such centres as may be recognised by the Examining Board from year to year as suitable and necessary:

    Provided that oral and practical examinations may be held at times and places specified by the Examining Board.

    (2) Every candidate for an examination shall, not later than the 31st day of July preceding the examination, give notice in such manner as the Examining Board may determine, of his intention to sit the examination.

Examination fees
7
  • Every candidate for examination in respect of examinations conducted by the Institute shall pay to the Institute the fee which the Board may prescribe for each subject.

Further requirements
8
  • (1) One or more subjects may be taken at a time, and a candidate may be credited with a pass in 1 or more subjects.

    (2) The award of the National Certificate will not be made until the candidate has passed in all subjects numbers 1-14 in clause 3(1) of this scheme, and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had three years' appropriate practical experience.

    (3) The subjects (numbers 1-4) Horticultural Botany I, Plant Protection I, Soil Science I, and Horticultural Techniques may be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate or at any subsequent examination:

    Provided that they shall not be taken at the examinations held in the month of November next following the registration of the candidate if the registration was effected later than the 31st day of May in the year in which the examinations are held.

    (4) A candidate shall observe the following conditions as to order of subjects:

    • (a) A candidate shall not take a second or third stage of a subject until he has passed the previous stage of that subject

    • (b) Except with the consent of the Examining Board, a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the third-year group (numbers 1-14) until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects of the first-year group (numbers 1) of clause 3(1) of this scheme:

    • (c) Except with the consent of the Examining Board, a candidate may not take any of the subjects of the fourth- and fifth-year groups numbers 15-19 until he has satisfactorily passed all of the subjects numbers 1-14 of clause 3(1) of this scheme.

    (5) The Oral and Practical Examination I and the subject Nursery Production I shall not be taken until the candidate has passed not fewer than 3 of the subjects of the first year (numbers 1) and has at least 2 years' practical experience. The Oral and Practical Examination II shall not be taken until the candidate has at least 3 years' appropriate practical experience.

    (6) A pass in the Diploma Examination shall not be awarded until the candidate has passed all the subjects of that examination, and has satisfied the Examining Board that he has had 2 years' appropriate practical experience after being awarded the National Certificate or has had not less than 5 years in all of such experience, as may be accepted by the Examining Board.

    (7) Where the required period of practical experience will end not later than the 31st day of May in any year, it may be assumed, but only for the purpose of entering for an examination, to have ended on the 31st day of October of the preceding year if the candidate undertakes to continue in his employment until the required period of practical experience is completed.

    (8) The candidate shall be free to suggest any topic not listed for Special Subjects I and II within the objectives of each of these, but prior approval of the Examining Board must be received before the candidate may proceed with the topic. The topic, whether selected from the prescribed list or otherwise chosen by the candidate, must be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 31st day of October in the year before the examination. The Examining Board may appoint, for the candidate, a consultant who will define the objectives and outline a study course for the selected area of specialisation referred to in this subclause (8).

    (9) The following provisions shall apply to the thesis for the Diploma:

    • (a) The thesis for the Diploma shall be submitted to the Examining Board not sooner than the August following the passing of all but one of the subjects numbered 15-18 in clause 3(1) of this scheme:

    • (b) The thesis, together with a statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board not later than the 30th day of September in the year of examination.

    (10) The Diploma may be awarded With Distinction, this being determined on the candidate's performance in all phases of the course, including the thesis. In the consideration of the award, greater emphasis will be placed on the results obtained in the later years of the Diploma course.

    (11) Notwithstanding anything hereinbefore provided, in the event of any candidate producing to the Examining Board evidence, in such form as it shall consider sufficient, of his intention to leave New Zealand for the purpose of pursuing his horticultural studies, the Examining Board may approve of the candidate presenting himself for the examination for the National Certificate, or for the Diploma, although his practical experience is 1 year less than that prescribed at that stage for the Certificate or Diploma for which he desires to sit. If in any such case the candidate passes the examination, he shall be provisionally recognised as having done so, but the appropriate Certificate or Diploma shall not be issued until he produces satisfactory evidence of the completion by him of the required period of practical experience.

Thesis
9
  • Every candidate for the Diploma shall submit a thesis dealing concisely with a selected aspect, or with some portion of a selected aspect of nursery production or a related topic to be chosen by the candidate, and approved by the Examining Board. The candidate's choice of subject shall be submitted for the approval of the Examining Board not less than 8 months before the date of the examination. In the thesis the candidate shall describe some work actually carried out by him. The Examining Board will appoint an adviser whom the candidate may consult at any time regarding his thesis material and who may suggest to the candidate appropriate approaches to his work and in the presentation of his material. The credit to be assigned to the thesis shall depend upon the evidence afforded of a ability to summarise previous knowledge, to carry out good practical work, where applicable, to make independent observations, and to present the results satisfactorily. Two copies of the thesis, together with a statutory declaration by the candidate (in a form obtainable from the Institute) to the effect that it is substantially the candidate's own work, shall be submitted to the Examining Board in accordance with clause 8(9) of this scheme. The Examining Board shall examine the thesis, and decide whether it is satisfactory. One copy of the thesis shall be returned to the candidate as soon as the decision of the Examining Board is made. The top copy shall be deposited in a library determined by the Examining Board. The thesis must be permanently bound within a cover, so that sheets cannot be lost or misplaced.

Prescriptions of subjects
10
  • The prescriptions in the subjects of the examinations shall be as follows:

    (1) Horticultural Botany I

    The plant and its environment—introductory ecological aspects.

    Morphology and anatomy of the seed plant (cells, tissues, organs—roots, stems, leaves).

    Life forms (annual, biennial, perennial—evergreen, deciduous, herbaceous, woody).

    Flower, fruit, seed, germination.

    Methods of reproduction (asexual, sexual, introduction to inheritance).

    Plant naming. Botanical nomenclature and elementary classification.

    The lower plants—brief coverage—general aspects, life cycles.

    (2) Plant Protection I

    An elementary knowledge of pests and diseases of plants.

    Attention is to be given to biological, cultural, and chemical control. This will include a brief knowledge of the identification of important pests and diseases and the safe use of the more common therapeutants.

    A general knowledge of the principles of plant quarantine and their application in New Zealand.

    (3) Soil Science I

    Soil formation; soil forming factors; soil development; physical properties; chemical properties; soil organic matter; biological properties.

    (4) Horticultural Techniques

    Review of the scope and location of ornamental horticulture and commercial horticultural industries.

    Horticultural and botanical terms.

    Propagation of plants from seed and vegetatively.

    Preparation of soil or growing medium.

    Techniques of raising horticultural plants from seed.

    Techniques of raising horticultural plants vegetatively.

    The culture of horticultural plants, outdoors and under protection.

    Harvesting, marketing, or use of horticultural plants (for market, process, or ornament).

    Equipment, labour, organisation, and records in horticultural practice.

    (5) Horticultural Botany II

    Plant physiology.

    Plant maintenance—photosynthesis, digestion, respiration, transport, water, and salt uptake.

    Growth and development—related to vegetative and reproductive growth.

    Flower and fruit development. Internal factors—hormones, dormancy, redistribution of nutrients, storage and utilisation of reserves. External factors—light, temperature, water, photoperiodism, vernalisation, mineral nutrition.

    (6) Plant Protection II

    Herbicides and their uses. Weed control.

    The formulation of herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides, including acaricides, nematocides, and bacterioides and their uses and legislation governing their use.

    (7) Soil Science

    Soils of New Zealand; study of soils in the field; soil fertility; drainage; irrigation; tillage operation; fertilisers; soil testing; soil conservation.

    (8) Nursery Production I

    Areas of production in New Zealand; trends in the industry; choice of crops, relationship to outlets, capital and land; layout and establishment of nurseries; management of the holding; more advanced plant propagation.

    (9) Oral and Practical Examination I

    The student will be questioned about the operations carried out in a nursery and may be asked to demonstrate the techniques used. (Diary to be submitted at examination time. In marginal cases the diary may determine whether or not a candidate gains a pass.)

    (10) Nursery Crop Botany

    Taxonomy and horticultural nomenclature; identification of weeds; crop ecology and control of environment; applied plant physiology, including use of hormones, growth retardants, etc.; mineral imbalance—symptoms of deficiency and excess—determination and correction of mineral imbalance; genetics and plant breeding.

    (11) Plant Protection III

    The control of plant pests and diseases involving a knowledge of ecology, life histories, host parasite relationships. Pest and disease forecasting. Soil borne and seed borne pests and diseases and their control. Pests and diseases of glasshouse crops and their control. Spray schedules used for the main fruit and vegetable crops and in nursery and ornamental horticulture, including crops under glass.

    (12) Nursery Production II

    The production and marketing of woody and herbaceous plants, seedlings, bulbs, and indoor plants. Utilisation of plant material.

    (13) Horticultural Machinery and Structures

    Tractors, rotary hoes, and their implements.

    Spraying, irrigation, and heating equipment.

    Construction, use, and maintenance of equipment.

    Soil disinfection equipment and soil mixing equipment.

    The design, construction, and methods of operation of glasshouses, shade and ancillary structures, and equipment used in automation.

    Machinery and structures for harvesting, storage, and marketing.

    Precautions in using electricity.

    (14) Oral and Practical Examination II

    A more advanced treatment of the operations than in Oral and Practical Examination I. Practical aspects of the formal subjects up to and including subjects of year III will be incorporated. (Diary to be submitted at examination time. In marginal cases the diary may determine whether or not a candidate gains a pass.)

    (15) Nursery Production III

    Production management and interaction of factors affecting yield and quality of annual, herbaceous, woody, and fruticose plants as produced in nurseries.

    Landscape design and construction.

    Elementary surveying.

    Turf culture.

    Retail sales outlet.

    Utilisation of plant material.

    (16) Horticultural Management

    Nature of management; the use of resources; budgeting; organisation and method; labour relations; elements of marketing; records; legislation.

    (17) Special Subject I

    Selected from the following or other approved topic (see clause 8(8) of this scheme):

    Soil and soilless media; container culture; specific aspects of propagation; extensive field production; irrigation; shading; herbicides; use of supplementary light; therapeutants; growth substances; mineral nutrition; soil disinfection; tree surgery; operation of a garden centre; tissue culture; root production and growth; maintenance of plant health.

    (18) Special Subject II

    Detailed consideration of the propagation, production, harvesting, and marketing of a specific nursery crop such as Begonia, Camellia, Fuschia, Gladiolus, Gloxinia, Pinus, Protea, Rhododendron, Saintpaulia, hyacinths, juniper, lilies, orchids, roses, tulips, apple, Chinese gooseberry, citrus, grape, peach.

    (19) Thesis

    As prescribed in clause 9 of this scheme.


Issued under the authority of the Regulations Act 1936.

Date of notification in Gazette: 11 November 1971.


Contents

  • 1General

  • 2About this eprint

  • 3List of amendments incorporated in this eprint (most recent first)


Notes
1 General
  • This is an eprint of the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture Examinations Approval Notice 1971. It incorporates all the amendments to the notice as at 6 November 2008. The list of amendments at the end of these notes specifies all the amendments incorporated into this eprint since 3 September 2007. Relevant provisions of any amending enactments that contain transitional, savings, or application provisions are also included, after the Principal enactment, in chronological order.

2 About this eprint
  • This eprint has not been officialised. For more information about officialisation, please see Making online legislation official under Status of legislation on this site in the About section of this website.

3 List of amendments incorporated in this eprint (most recent first)
  • Regulations Revocation Order 2008 (SR 2008/367): clause 3


  • 1 SR 1954/207

  • 2 SR 1957/149

  • 3 These families are defined in the wide sense (as by Engler and Prantl) rather than in the narrow sense (as by Hutchinson).