Direction to Require Screening Notice 2007

Reprint as at 22 March 2007

Direction to Require Screening Notice 2007

(SR 2007/78)


Note

Changes authorised by section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989 have been made in this reprint.

A general outline of these changes is set out in the notes at the end of this reprint, together with other explanatory material about this reprint.

The Direction to Require Screening Notice 2007 is administered by the Ministry of Transport.


Pursuant to section 77A(1) of the Civil Aviation Act 1990, in order to enhance aviation security to enable New Zealand to be part of a concerted international response to a threat to aviation security, notice is given that I have directed the Aviation Security Service to perform the functions listed in the Schedule. This direction is consistent with the recommended security control guidelines for screening liquids, gels, and aerosols issued by the International Civil Aviation Organization. This notice comes into force on 31 March 2007.


Schedule

The Aviation Security Service must, at every international screening point, screen and, if necessary, undertake reasonable searches for liquids, aerosols, and gels, including (but not limited to)—

  • (a) water and other drinks, soups, syrups, jams, stews, sauces, and pastes (including toothpaste); and

  • (b) foods in sauces or containing a high liquid content; and

  • (c) creams, lotions, cosmetics, and oils; and

  • (d) gels (including hair and shower gels); and

  • (e) contents of pressurised containers (including shaving foam, other foam, and deodorants); and

  • (f) waxy substances (including hair wax); and

  • (g) mascara, lipstick, lip gloss, and lip balm; and

  • (h) any item of similar consistency at room temperature to the items specified in paragraphs (a) to (g).

For the purposes of this direction, international screening point means a passenger inspection and screening station that is used for screening and searching people and items that enter a sterile area that services international flights (including transit flights).

Dated at Wellington this 20th day of March 2007.

Harry Duynhoven,
Minister for Transport Safety.


Explanatory note

This note is not part of the notice, but is intended to indicate its general effect.

This notice, which comes into force on 31 March 2007, is published in the Gazette (2007) as required by section 77A(1) of the Civil Aviation Act 1990. It is published in the Statutory Regulations series (2007) in accordance with the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989 to augment the circulation and accessibility of the notice. The notice sets out the direction that the Minister for Transport Safety has given to the Aviation Security Service requiring the Aviation Security Service to screen and, if necessary, to undertake reasonable searches for liquids, aerosols, and gels at international screening points.


Issued under the authority of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989.

Date of notification in Gazette: 22 March 2007.


Contents

  • 1General

  • 2Status of reprints

  • 3How reprints are prepared

  • 4Changes made under section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989

  • 5List of amendments incorporated in this reprint (most recent first)


Notes
1 General
  • This is a reprint of the Direction to Require Screening Notice 2007. The reprint incorporates all the amendments to the Direction to Require Screening Notice 2007 as at 22 March 2007, as specified in the list of amendments at the end of these notes.

    Relevant provisions of any amending enactments that have yet to come into force or that contain relevant transitional or savings provisions are also included, after the principal enactment, in chronological order.

2 Status of reprints
  • Under section 16D of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989, reprints are presumed to correctly state, as at the date of the reprint, the law enacted by the principal enactment and by the amendments to that enactment. This presumption applies even though editorial changes authorised by section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989 have been made in the reprint.

    This presumption may be rebutted by producing the official volumes of statutes or statutory regulations in which the principal enactment and its amendments are contained.

3 How reprints are prepared
  • A number of editorial conventions are followed in the preparation of reprints. For example, the enacting words are not included in Acts, and provisions that are repealed or revoked are omitted. For a detailed list of the editorial conventions, see http://www.pco.parliament.govt.nz/legislation/reprints.shtml or Part 8 of the Tables of Acts and Ordinances and Statutory Regulations, and Deemed Regulations in Force.

4 Changes made under section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989
  • Section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989 authorises the making of editorial changes in a reprint as set out in sections 17D and 17E of that Act so that, to the extent permitted, the format and style of the reprinted enactment is consistent with current legislative drafting practice. Changes that would alter the effect of the legislation are not permitted.

    A new format of legislation was introduced on 1 January 2000. Changes to legislative drafting style have also been made since 1997, and are ongoing. To the extent permitted by section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989, all legislation reprinted after 1 January 2000 is in the new format for legislation and reflects current drafting practice at the time of the reprint.

    In outline, the editorial changes made in reprints under the authority of section 17C of the Acts and Regulations Publication Act 1989 are set out below, and they have been applied, where relevant, in the preparation of this reprint:

    • omission of unnecessary referential words (such as of this section and of this Act)

    • typeface and type size (Times Roman, generally in 11.5 point)

    • layout of provisions, including:

      • indentation

      • position of section headings (eg, the number and heading now appear above the section)

    • format of definitions (eg, the defined term now appears in bold type, without quotation marks)

    • format of dates (eg, a date formerly expressed as the 1st day of January 1999 is now expressed as 1 January 1999)

    • position of the date of assent (it now appears on the front page of each Act)

    • punctuation (eg, colons are not used after definitions)

    • Parts numbered with roman numerals are replaced with arabic numerals, and all cross-references are changed accordingly

    • case and appearance of letters and words, including:

      • format of headings (eg, headings where each word formerly appeared with an initial capital letter followed by small capital letters are amended so that the heading appears in bold, with only the first word (and any proper nouns) appearing with an initial capital letter)

      • small capital letters in section and subsection references are now capital letters

    • schedules are renumbered (eg, Schedule 1 replaces First Schedule), and all cross-references are changed accordingly

    • running heads (the information that appears at the top of each page)

    • format of two-column schedules of consequential amendments, and schedules of repeals (eg, they are rearranged into alphabetical order, rather than chronological).

5 List of amendments incorporated in this reprint (most recent first)