National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan Order 2015

2015/140

Coat of Arms of New Zealand

National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan Order 2015

Jerry Mateparae, Governor-General

Order in Council

At Wellington this 2nd day of June 2015

Present:
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council

Pursuant to sections 39(1) and 45 of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002, His Excellency the Governor-General makes the following order, acting—

(a)

on the advice and with the consent of the Executive Council; and

(b)

on the recommendation of the Minister of Civil Defence made following compliance with sections 41 and 42 of that Act.

Order

1 Title

This order is the National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan Order 2015.

2 Commencement

This order comes into force on 1 December 2015.

3 National civil defence emergency management plan

(1)

The national civil defence emergency management plan (including its appendices) set out in the Schedule is made.

(2)

The period for which the national civil defence emergency management plan remains operative begins on 1 December 2015 and ends with the close of 30 November 2020.

4 Publication in other forms not prohibited

To avoid doubt, nothing in this order prohibits the publication of the national civil defence emergency management plan, in whole or in part, in a style suitable for particular users of the plan, including publication—

(a)

in a different format; or

(b)

with or without graphics; or

(c)

with or without additional material.

5 Revocation

Schedule National civil defence emergency management plan

cl 3(1)

Contents

1Status
2Interpretation
3Incorporation by reference
4Purpose of this plan
5Audience for this plan
6Scope of this plan
7Objectives of this plan
8Goals of National CDEM Strategy
9Relationship of objectives of this plan to goals of National CDEM Strategy
10Hazards and risks to be managed at national level
11State of national emergency
12State of local emergency and other emergencies
13ODESC system
14Lead agency role in emergencies at national level
15Support agency role in emergencies at national level
16Director
17National Controller
18Group Controllers and Local Controllers
19General responsibilities
20Roles and responsibilities across 4 Rs
21Introduction
22Objective
23Principles
24Role of MCDEM during reduction and readiness
25Role of MCDEM during response and recovery
26Introduction
27Objective
28Principles
29Role of CDEM Groups across 4 Rs
30Introduction
31Objective
32Principles
33Currently formed clusters
34Cluster chairpersons
35Introduction
36Principles
37Introduction
38Objective
39Principles
40Role of New Zealand Police during reduction and readiness
41Role of New Zealand Police during response and recovery
42Introduction
43Objective
44Principles
45Role of fire services during reduction and readiness
46Role of fire services during response and recovery
47Introduction
48Objective
49Principles
50Role of health and disability services during reduction and readiness
51Role of health and disability services during response and recovery
52Introduction
53Objective
54Principles
55Role of New Zealand Defence Force during readiness
56Role of New Zealand Defence Force during response
57Introduction
58Objective
59Principles
60Role of lifeline utilities during reduction and readiness
61Role of lifeline utilities during response and recovery
62Introduction
63Objective
64Principles
65Role of welfare services agencies during reduction and readiness
66Role of welfare services agencies during response and recovery
67Registration
68Needs assessment
69Inquiry
70Care and protection services for children and young people
71Psychosocial support
72Household goods and services
73Shelter and accommodation
74Financial assistance
75Animal welfare
76Introduction
77Objective
78Principles
79Management of buildings during reduction and readiness
80Management of buildings during response and recovery
81Introduction
82Objective
83Principles
84Role of science and research organisations during reduction and recovery
85Role of science and research organisations during readiness and response
86Introduction
87Objective
88Principles
89Legislation involving aspects of reduction
90Reduction at national level
91Reduction under this plan
92Introduction
93Objective
94Principles
95Readiness activities
96Introduction
97Business continuity planning
98Emergency management planning
99Introduction
100CDEM capability development strategy
101CDEM competency framework
102Capability development activities
103Introduction
104National CDEM Exercise Programme
105Exercising and testing activities
106Introduction
107CDEM Monitoring and Evaluation Programme
108Monitoring and evaluation activities
109Introduction
110National CDEM public education strategy
111National CDEM public education programme
112Introduction
113Objectives
114Principles
115Coordinated Incident Management System
116Transition to recovery
117Introduction
118Objective
119Principles
120National warning system
121Introduction
122Objective
123Principles
124MCDEM use of NCMC when lead agency
125Use of NCMC by other lead agencies
126Introduction
127Objective
128Principles
129Reporting information during emergency
130Introduction
131Objectives
132Principles
133National roles
134Introduction
135Objective
136Principles
137CDEM logistics activities
138Introduction
139Objective
140Principles
141Management of evacuation
142Types of evacuation
143Phases of evacuation
144Introduction
145Objective
146Principles
147National roles
148Approval to accept or request international assistance
149Requests for international assistance
150Offers of international assistance
151United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA)
152Introduction
153Objectives
154Principles
155Transition from response to recovery
156National recovery activities
157CDEM Group recovery activities
158Exit strategy
159Introduction
160Objectives
161Principles
162Government financial support to local authorities during response
163Government financial support to local authorities during recovery
164Special policy for recovery

Part 1 Introduction

1 Status

This plan—

(a)

is made under sections 39(1) and 45 of the Act; and

(c)

becomes operational on 1 December 2015; and

(d)

may be amended in accordance with section 47 of the Act at any time; and

(e)

must be reviewed (and may, following the review, be amended or revoked and replaced) under section 46 of the Act (unless reviewed earlier) if—

(i)

this plan has been operative for 5 years or more; and

(ii)

it is more than 5 years since this plan has been reviewed; and

(f)

continues in force under section 45(b) of the Act if not replaced.

General

2 Interpretation

(1)

In this plan, unless the context otherwise requires,—

4 Rs means—

(a)

reduction (identifying and analysing risks to life and property from hazards, taking steps to eliminate those risks if practicable, and, if not, reducing the magnitude of their impact and the likelihood of their occurrence to an acceptable level); and

(b)

readiness (developing operational systems and capabilities before an emergency happens, including self-help and response programmes for the general public and specific programmes for emergency services, lifeline utilities, and other agencies); and

(c)

response (actions taken immediately before, during, or directly after an emergency to save lives and property, and to help communities recover); and

(d)

recovery (the co-ordinated efforts and processes used to bring about the immediate, medium-term, and long-term holistic regeneration and enhancement of a community following an emergency)

agency means a government or non-government organisation or entity (other than a CDEM Group) with responsibilities under this plan

building has the same meaning as in sections 8 and 9 of the Building Act 2004

CDEM means civil defence emergency management

CDEM Group means a Civil Defence Emergency Management Group established under section 12 of the Act

CIMS means New Zealand Coordinated Incident Management System

cluster means a group of agencies that interact to achieve common CDEM outcomes

DHB means a district health board established under section 19 of the New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000

DPMC means the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

ECC means an Emergency Coordination Centre, which is a facility that operates at the CDEM Group level to co-ordinate and support 1 or more EOCs that are activated within a group area in response to an emergency

EOC means an Emergency Operations Centre, which is a facility that operates at the agency, territorial authority, or unitary authority level and is used to manage the response to an emergency

fire services includes the fire service units maintained by the New Zealand Fire Service, the National Rural Fire Authority, rural fire authorities, airport rescue fire services, the New Zealand Defence Force, industrial fire brigades registered under section 36 of the Fire Service Act 1975, and other fire service resources owned by private organisations

GNS Science means the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Limited

group area means the geographical area for which a CDEM Group is responsible

health and disability services means the disability support services, public health services, and personal health services as those terms are defined in section 6(1) of the New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000

lead agency means the agency with the primary mandate for managing the response to an emergency, as specified in Appendix 1

Local Controller means a Local Controller appointed under section 27 of the Act

MCDEM means the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management

National CDEM Strategy means the National Civil Defence Emergency Management Strategy completed under section 31 of the Act

NCMC means the National Crisis Management Centre

New Zealand Police means the instrument of the Crown continued in existence by section 7(1) of the Policing Act 2008

NSC means the National Security Committee of Cabinet

NWCG means the National Welfare Coordination Group

ODESC means the Officials Committee for Domestic and External Security Coordination

ODESC system means the system of domestic and external security co-ordination

PHU means a Public Health Unit of a DHB

recovery office means a recovery office established at the local, CDEM, or national level

SCE means a sector co-ordinating entity that is an organisation, a group of sector representatives, or an individual agreed by a utility sector to provide a single point of contact to the NCMC or an ECC

support agency means any agency, other than the lead agency, that has a role or responsibilities during the response to an emergency

supporting documentation includes detailed explanations, standard operating procedures, the Director’s guidelines, codes, and technical standards

supporting plan means a plan issued by the Director under section 9(3) of the Act in support of the arrangements set out in this plan

The Guide means The Guide to the National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan that is issued by the Director under section 9(3) of the Act

this plan means the national civil defence emergency management plan

UNOCHA means United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

(2)

The following terms have the same meaning as in section 4 of the Act: civil defence emergency management, Director, emergency, emergency services, Group Controller, hazard, lifeline utility, local authority, Minister, National Controller, national significance, Recovery Co-ordinator, risk, state of emergency, state of local emergency, state of national emergency, territorial authority, unitary authority.

3 Incorporation by reference

(1)

Section 40 of the Act allows incorporation by reference of material that is too large or otherwise impractical to be printed as part of this plan.

(2)

No documents are incorporated by reference under this plan; however, other materials are mentioned (see The Guide).

Part 2 Purpose and objectives of this plan

4 Purpose of this plan

The purpose of this plan is to state the guiding principles and roles and responsibilities for CDEM across the 4 Rs at the national level so that all agencies and CDEM Groups are able to—

(a)

understand the hazards and risks; and

(b)

work to reduce those hazards; and

(c)

build resilience in respect of those hazards; and

(d)

build capability and capacity to provide co-ordinated, integrated, and effective responses to, and recovery from, emergencies.

5 Audience for this plan

This plan is for agencies and CDEM Groups with roles and responsibilities in CDEM across the 4 Rs before, during, or after—

(a)

a state of national emergency; or

(b)

an emergency requiring co-ordination and support at the national level.

6 Scope of this plan

This plan—

(a)

is a statement of the frameworks, objectives, principles, roles, and responsibilities across the 4 Rs that—

(i)

are in place on the date that this plan is made; and

(ii)

apply across agencies and CDEM Groups; and

(iii)

take account of existing statutory responsibilities of agencies and CDEM Groups across the 4 Rs to manage hazards and risks; and

(b)

applies to any emergency requiring CDEM at a national level, including—

(i)

a state of national emergency; or

(ii)

an emergency requiring co-ordination and support at the national level; and

(c)

is supported by The Guide, which—

(i)

augments this plan; and

(ii)

includes additional material that enables this plan; and

(d)

may be amended in accordance with section 47 of the Act.

7 Objectives of this plan

This plan has the following objectives:

(a)

objective A: establishes the context for CDEM at the national level, including the hazards and risks to be managed; and

(b)

objective B: sets out a concept of operations for CDEM at the national level for any emergency; and

(c)

objective C: outlines arrangements for the co-ordination of CDEM during a state of national emergency; and

(d)

objective D: states the roles and responsibilities of agencies and CDEM Groups across the 4 Rs.

8 Goals of National CDEM Strategy

The National CDEM Strategy sets out the following 4 goals:

(a)

goal 1: increase community awareness, understanding, preparedness, and participation in respect of CDEM; and

(b)

goal 2: reduce the risks from hazards to New Zealand; and

(c)

goal 3: enhance New Zealand’s capability to manage emergencies; and

(d)

goal 4: enhance New Zealand’s capability to recover from emergencies.

9 Relationship of objectives of this plan to goals of National CDEM Strategy

(1)

The objectives of this plan assist in giving effect to the goals of the National CDEM Strategy as follows:

(a)

objective A of this plan relates generally to goals 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the National CDEM Strategy; and

(b)

objectives B, C, and D of this plan relate to the achievement of goals 3 and 4 of the National CDEM Strategy.

(2)

This plan is the primary means of improving the ability of government to manage an event of national significance.

Part 3 Hazards and risks

10 Hazards and risks to be managed at national level

(1)

This Part states the hazards and risks to be managed at the national level and this plan identifies the CDEM necessary at the national level to manage those hazards and risks.

(2)

The following hazards, either singularly or in combination, have the potential to cause emergencies that may require co-ordination or management at the national level:

(a)

earthquakes:

(b)

volcanic hazards:

(c)

landslides:

(d)

tsunamis:

(e)

coastal hazards (including coastal erosion, storm surges, and large swells):

(f)

floods:

(g)

severe winds:

(h)

snow:

(i)

droughts:

(j)

wild fires and urban fires:

(k)

animal pests and diseases:

(l)

plant pests and diseases:

(m)

infectious human disease pandemics (including water-borne illnesses):

(n)

infrastructure failure:

(o)

hazardous substance incidents:

(p)

major transport accidents:

(q)

food safety incidents (for example, accidental or deliberate contamination of food):

(r)

terrorism.

(3)

This plan may be used to address the consequences of an emergency arising from any hazard.

(4)

Understanding of the risks associated with specific hazards and event scenarios is based on assessments undertaken by CDEM Groups, agencies, and the science and research sector.

(5)

Possible consequences include—

(a)

displaced, isolated, injured, ill, and deceased persons, psychosocial concerns, deterioration of community well-being, and other matters involving the welfare of people and animals:

(b)

loss of lifeline utility services (for example, telecommunications, transport, energy, water, and waste water networks):

(c)

damage to buildings and structures:

(d)

direct and indirect economic losses, restrictions on commerce, migration and trade, and the impairment of financial systems:

(e)

degradation of the ecological, physical, amenity, and heritage values of areas and resources.

(6)

The recommended risk management standard to be used as the basis for risk assessment and management in New Zealand is AS/NZS ISO 31000.2009.

(7)

This plan adopts a functional approach to the 4 Rs (across agencies and their activities) to cover any combination and scale of consequences arising from an emergency.

(8)

The co-ordination and resources necessary at the national level may vary depending on local management of the emergency.

(9)

Different lead agencies and emergency management planning arrangements may be mandated under other Acts.

(10)

Pre-planning may be undertaken, and supporting plans may be developed, in support of this plan when the consequences are identified and response and recovery arrangements are considered necessary.

(11)

The approach adopted in subclauses (7) and (8) acknowledges the existing and developing risk reduction measures and practices at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels.

(12)

The identification and assessment of hazards and risks that require management under this plan are ongoing processes that include consideration of—

(a)

new knowledge; and

(b)

risks that vary over time; and

(c)

the potential influence of climate change on hazards and risks.

(13)

Each agency and CDEM Group should, to the extent that it relates to its role and responsibilities under this plan,—

(a)

monitor the developments and evolving trends in hazards and risks and communities’ vulnerability to them; and

(b)

factor any changes into its planning and operational activities across the 4 Rs in accordance with—

(i)

its duties under the Act; and

(ii)

its roles and responsibilities under this plan; and

(iii)

any other mandate under which it operates that supports achieving the goals of the National CDEM Strategy; and

(c)

identify and implement measures and mechanisms to reduce the risks from hazards.

Part 4 Management of emergencies

States of emergency

11 State of national emergency

(1)

Section 66 of the Act authorises the Minister, under certain conditions specified in that section, to declare that a state of national emergency exists over the whole of New Zealand or any areas or districts.

(2)

In the event that a state of national emergency is declared,—

(a)

any state of local emergency then in force in the area to which the state of national emergency applies ceases to have effect; and

(b)

the Director, or the National Controller in accordance with a delegation under section 10 of the Act, will co-ordinate, direct, and control the resources made available for CDEM.

12 State of local emergency and other emergencies

For any emergency, other than a state of national emergency, the arrangements in this plan may be used to support—

(a)

CDEM Groups during—

(i)

an emergency of national significance; or

(ii)

a state of local emergency declared under section 68 or 69 of the Act; or

(iii)

any other emergency:

(b)

a lead agency at the national level during an emergency where the MCDEM is not the lead agency (see Appendix 1).

Crisis management arrangements

13 ODESC system

(1)

The ODESC system is used by central government in the oversight and governance of national security issues, including during significant crises or security events where consequences of national significance warrant the co-ordination of all-of-government planning and prioritisation.

(2)

The ODESC system—

(a)

brings together information for Ministers, co-ordinates analysis and development of options, and assists decision making in Cabinet; and

(b)

is collective without affecting the existing responsibilities of Ministers or agencies; and

(c)

operates at 3 levels as follows:

(i)

the NSC; and

(ii)

the ODESC; and

(iii)

watch groups and working groups of senior officials, as required.

(3)

The NSC—

(a)

is the key decision-making body of executive government for co-ordinating and directing national responses to major crises or circumstances affecting national security (either domestic or international); and

(b)

is chaired by the Prime Minister; and

(c)

has power to act where the need for urgent action or operational or security considerations require it.

(4)

The ODESC—

(a)

is a group of senior officials; and

(b)

is chaired by the chief executive of the DPMC; and

(c)

is the strategic mechanism for co-ordinating an all-of-government response to events; and

(d)

supports Ministers in developing high-level strategic direction, policy, and priorities, and in authorising additional resources to deal with crises; and

(e)

exercises policy oversight and advises the Prime Minister, Cabinet, and, when activated, the NSC.

14 Lead agency role in emergencies at national level

(1)

A lead agency is the agency with the primary mandate for managing the response to an emergency, and at the national level the lead agency’s role is to—

(a)

monitor and assess the situation; and

(b)

plan for and co-ordinate the national response; and

(c)

report to the ODESC and provide policy advice; and

(d)

co-ordinate the dissemination of public information.

(2)

A lead agency—

(a)

should develop and maintain capability and capacity to ensure that it is able to perform its role; and

(b)

may draw on the advice and expertise of expert emergency managers in doing so.

(3)

The specific hazard, and its primary consequences to be managed in an emergency, determines which agency is the lead agency at the national level (lead agencies at the national and regional levels are listed in Appendix 1).

(4)

The MCDEM, when it is the lead agency, is to use the arrangements in this plan in a manner that is consistent with the functions carried out and powers exercised by the Director and the National Controller under the Act.

(5)

A lead agency, other than the MCDEM,—

(a)

is expected to co-ordinate the management of the emergency in accordance with its own emergency management plan and its statutory functions and powers; and

(b)

may use the provisions of this plan in support of its management of the consequences of the emergency if required.

15 Support agency role in emergencies at national level

(1)

Each support agency should develop and maintain capability and capacity to ensure that it is able to perform its role.

(2)

During the response to an emergency, when the MCDEM is the lead agency at the national level, each support agency is expected to—

(a)

co-ordinate, directly or through established clusters, with the MCDEM to provide an integrated response; and

(b)

provide a liaison officer to the NCMC to represent the relevant agency or cluster; and

(c)

report to, and operate in accordance with the direction of, the National Controller; and

(d)

manage its own response in support of the MCDEM.

(3)

Particular agencies may be asked to be represented at the ODESC system level, to report to the ODESC on their respective areas of responsibility, and to respond to strategic direction from the ODESC.

(4)

In an emergency managed at the national level by a lead agency other than the MCDEM, the MCDEM may act as a support agency to the lead agency and will—

(a)

provide a liaison officer to the lead agency to facilitate advice and information transfers and to manage requests for operational activities related to CDEM; and

(b)

undertake any other functions and activities as agreed with the lead agency; and

(c)

provide NCMC facilities support to the lead agency.

16 Director

(1)

The functions and powers of the Director are set out in sections 8 and 9 of the Act and, in relation to this plan, include responsibility for—

(a)

co-ordinating, for the purposes of CDEM, the use of resources made available under this plan; and

(b)

directing and controlling the resources available for CDEM during a state of national emergency; and

(c)

controlling the exercise of powers and the performance of functions and duties of CDEM Groups and Group Controllers during a state of national emergency; and

(d)

ensuring that the Minister and the ODESC are adequately briefed on the situation during an emergency; and

(e)

informing the Minister and the ODESC of assistance likely to be required for response and recovery operations; and

(f)

establishing processes under this plan that will allow the response to, and recovery from, an emergency to be given effect; and

(g)

advising the Minister on any special policies for implementing CDEM support; and

(h)

performing any functions under section 8 of the Act and exercising any powers under section 9 of the Act that are necessary to achieve the purpose of this plan.

(2)

The Director is a member of the ODESC.

17 National Controller

(1)

The National Controller may—

(a)

be appointed by the Director under section 10(1) of the Act:

(b)

be delegated the Director’s functions and powers specified in sections 8(2)(h) and 9(2)(a) of the Act for the purposes of dealing with a state of national emergency:

(c)

if no delegation has been made under section 10(1) of the Act, be the Director, who has all of the power conferred on the National Controller under the Act.

(2)

If appointed, and delegated the powers and functions of the Director, a National Controller,—

(a)

during a state of national emergency, directs, controls, and co-ordinates, for the purposes of CDEM, the use of resources made available under this plan; and

(b)

during an emergency of national significance, co-ordinates national resources to support the local response; and

(c)

during an emergency managed by a lead agency other than the MCDEM, co-ordinates the CDEM activities in support of the response to that emergency.

(3)

The National Controller ordinarily undertakes and exercises his or her functions and powers in an emergency from the NCMC.

(4)

During a state of national emergency, the National Controller is able to—

(a)

deploy forward to the affected area to better control and direct the national response; or

(b)

deploy representatives forward to the affected areas.

(5)

If the National Controller or representatives are deployed forward, there must be clear delineation of functions and responsibilities between the forward elements and those retained in the NCMC.

18 Group Controllers and Local Controllers

Each CDEM Group—

(a)

must, under section 26 of the Act, appoint by name or reference—

(i)

a suitably qualified and experienced person as Group Controller for its group area to carry out the functions under section 28 of the Act; and

(ii)

at least 1 suitably qualified and experienced person to perform the functions and duties and exercise the powers of the Group Controller on the occurrence of a vacancy in the office of Group Controller or in the absence from duty of the Group Controller; and

(b)

may, under section 27 of the Act, appoint by name or reference 1 or more suitably qualified and experienced persons as Local Controllers.

Part 5 Roles and responsibilities

General

19 General responsibilities

(1)

The machinery of government must continue to function (even though this may be at a reduced level) during and after an emergency.

(2)

The Act puts certain responsibilities on government agencies, emergency services, lifeline utilities, and local authorities, including the responsibilities of—

(a)

functioning during an emergency to the fullest possible extent (even though this may be at a reduced level); and

(b)

responding to emergencies as required.

(3)

Section 59 of the Act requires every government department, CDEM Group, local authority, emergency service, lifeline utility, and any other agency required by the Act, any regulations made under the Act, or any CDEM plans to take all necessary steps to—

(a)

undertake CDEM; or

(b)

perform its functions and duties under the Act.

(4)

Agencies may have obligations under their own legislation to deal with hazards and consequences, and the Act and this plan do not affect those obligations.

(5)

Non-governmental organisations do not have specific responsibilities under the Act, but this plan acknowledges their importance in an emergency.

(6)

The principal mechanism for the national co-ordination of non-governmental organisations with other agencies in response and recovery is via the relevant clusters.

(7)

Volunteers do not have defined roles and responsibilities in this plan, but they are acknowledged as an important resource and are often an integral part of response and recovery activities at the CDEM Group and local levels.

(8)

Volunteers are managed and co-ordinated at a CDEM Group or local authority level.

20 Roles and responsibilities across 4 Rs

In addition to the specific roles and responsibilities of agencies in this Part of this plan, all agencies are to carry out activities across the 4 Rs in accordance with Parts 6, 7, 8, and 9 of this plan.

Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management

21 Introduction

(1)

The MCDEM is the lead agency responsible for co-ordinating the management of emergencies resulting from various hazards (see Appendix 1), using the arrangements in this plan and the functions and powers of the Director and the National Controller under the Act.

(2)

The MCDEM may act as a support agency by co-ordinating the CDEM response to any emergency managed by another lead agency.

22 Objective

The objective of the MCDEM is to provide leadership, strategic guidance, national co-ordination, and the facilitation and promotion of various key activities across the 4 Rs to achieve the purpose of the Act.

23 Principles

The principles underlying the role of the MCDEM are to—

(a)

provide leadership and strategic direction for CDEM; and

(b)

provide co-ordination across a wide range of agencies and sectors, recognising that emergencies involve a multi-agency response; and

(c)

promote research initiatives that identify hazards and inform actions to reduce risks to communities; and

(d)

promote risk reduction strategies; and

(e)

promote hazard awareness and emergency preparedness in communities and organisations; and

(f)

provide planning and preparation for response and recovery; and

(g)

build capacity and capability—

(i)

to support, co-ordinate, and manage at the national level the response to, and recovery from, an emergency; and

(ii)

to adapt to changing demands; and

(h)

promote and support a means to enable a co-ordinated and holistic recovery from an emergency.

24 Role of MCDEM during reduction and readiness

(1)

The functions of the Director under section 8 of the Act include carrying out reduction and readiness activities.

(2)

The MCDEM supports the Director in carrying out those activities and will—

(a)

contribute to the development of research, policy, regulation, frameworks, and guidance that facilitate understanding risk and the 4 Rs; and

(b)

promote and advocate reduction; and

(c)

plan for response and recovery; and

(d)

provide for public education; and

(e)

provide for capability development; and

(f)

carry out national CDEM exercises; and

(g)

monitor and evaluate preparedness and performance; and

(h)

manage, develop, and maintain appropriate national response and recovery capability; and

(i)

support agencies and CDEM Groups in undertaking their roles and responsibilities under the Act; and

(j)

appoint, develop, and maintain key operational positions, including a National Controller, a National Recovery Manager, a National Public Information Manager, a National Welfare Manager, a National Lifeline Utility Co-ordinator, and operations, intelligence, planning, and logistics staff.

25 Role of MCDEM during response and recovery

(1)

The functions under section 8 of the Act include carrying out response and recovery activities.

(2)

The MCDEM supports the Director and the National Controller in carrying out those activities and will—

(a)

activate and co-ordinate national-level response and recovery activities from the NCMC or its recovery office; and

(b)

support and co-ordinate CDEM Group response and recovery activities; and

(c)

report to the ODESC and the Minister; and

(d)

issue emergency management information, including national warnings and advisories, national situation reports, and national response and recovery action plans; and

(e)

issue public information.

CDEM Groups

26 Introduction

Each CDEM Group—

(a)

is, in the case of 2 or more local authorities, a joint standing committee of those local authorities established under section 12 of the Act; and

(b)

is, in the case of a unitary authority, a committee of the unitary authority established under section 12 of the Act; and

(c)

is responsible for overseeing the delivery of CDEM in its group area in accordance with section 17 of the Act; and

(d)

is supported by each member of the CDEM Group, the Co-ordinating Executive Group appointed under section 20 of the Act, and any partner agencies that have CDEM duties, roles, and responsibilities within the group area.

27 Objective

The objective of each CDEM Group is to provide leadership in the delivery of co-ordinated and collaborative arrangements for CDEM among member local authorities, partner agencies, clusters, and communities within its group area.

28 Principles

The principles underlying the role of CDEM Groups are to—

(a)

promote the sustainable management of hazards; and

(b)

empower communities to achieve acceptable levels of risk; and

(c)

provide for planning and preparation for response to, and recovery from, emergencies; and

(d)

co-ordinate programmes and activities, and encourage co-operation and joint action, among agencies across the 4 Rs; and

(e)

provide the basis for the integration of local with national CDEM policies, processes, and operations.

29 Role of CDEM Groups across 4 Rs

(1)

The functions of a CDEM Group, and of each member, are listed in section 17 of the Act.

(2)

The functions aim to co-ordinate and support CDEM activities within the group area across the 4 Rs.

(3)

For the purposes of this plan, the functions of each CDEM Group, and each member, are to—

(a)

identify the hazards and risks in its group area that may result in an emergency that requires national-level support and co-ordination; and

(b)

undertake, where practicable, any actions to reduce hazards and risks in its group area that may require national-level support and co-ordination in an emergency; and

(c)

establish the means within its group area, in line with national guidelines and in collaboration with its supporting agencies, to provide timely warning of hazards, and public information about them; and

(d)

develop, maintain, and regularly review its capability for reduction, readiness, response, and recovery within its group area, and take part in relevant exercises under the National CDEM Exercise Programme; and

(e)

appoint, develop, and maintain key operational positions, including Local Controllers and CDEM Group Controllers, Recovery Managers, Public Information Managers, Welfare Managers, Lifeline Utility Co-ordinators, and operations, intelligence, planning, and logistics staff.

(4)

A CDEM Group may be requested or directed by the National Controller to activate its CDEM arrangements to the appropriate level, whether or not a state of emergency has been declared, in support of a response that is—

(a)

within its group area; or

(b)

within the group area of another CDEM Group; or

(c)

being managed by a lead agency other than MCDEM.

(5)

During a state of national emergency, each CDEM Group is to give effect to the directions of the National Controller.

Clusters

30 Introduction

(1)

A cluster is a group of agencies, either within or across sectors, that interact to achieve common outcomes, including the performance of a function or related functions.

(2)

An agency’s membership in a cluster does not limit any of the agency’s statutory obligations under the Act or any other enactment.

31 Objective

The objective of a cluster is to provide co-ordination across agencies to carry out a function or related functions across the 4 Rs, including—

(a)

joint planning; and

(b)

establishing and maintaining inter-agency communications; and

(c)

providing access to shared resources; and

(d)

avoiding duplication.

32 Principles

The principles underlying the role of clusters are to—

(a)

operate in a co-ordinated multi-agency environment; and

(b)

form clusters at the national level (but also at the CDEM Group and local levels where appropriate); and

(c)

be flexible (with agencies able to join, exit from, or merge with clusters, for the purpose of enhancing arrangements, while allowing the overlapping of functions or membership where appropriate); and

(d)

determine their own membership; and

(e)

organise themselves, including establishing their internal management structures, co-ordinators, and emergency management plans; and

(f)

develop and exercise liaison at the appropriate level of operation with local EOCs, ECCs, or the NCMC.

33 Currently formed clusters

Currently formed clusters include—

(a)

transport providers; and

(b)

telecommunications providers; and

(c)

lifeline utilities; and

(d)

welfare services; and

(e)

public information providers; and

(f)

science and research providers; and

(g)

international assistance providers; and

(h)

the visitors sector; and

(i)

search and rescue.

34 Cluster chairpersons

(1)

Each cluster is expected to select one of its members to be the chairperson and secretariat for the cluster.

(2)

As the chairperson, the selected member is responsible for bringing together the emergency management planning for the cluster.

(3)

As the secretariat, the selected member is responsible for giving administrative support, distributing information, and working as a clearing house.

Emergency services generally

35 Introduction

Emergency services, which include the New Zealand Police, the New Zealand Fire Service, the National Rural Fire Authority, the rural fire authorities, and health and disability services, have duties under section 63 of the Act.

36 Principles

The principles underlying the role of emergency services are to—

(a)

ensure that planning encompasses the 4 Rs and enables an effective response to all emergencies; and

(b)

have,—

(i)

at the national level, a senior officer—

(A)

who has the authority to co-ordinate the actitivies of the officer’s emergency service; and

(B)

who is appointed by the relevant chief executive or national commander of each emergency service to liaise with the National Controller or designated staff within the NCMC; and

(ii)

at the CDEM Group level, a senior officer assigned to the Co-ordinating Executive Group of each CDEM Group; and

(c)

use the CIMS framework to guide the co-ordination of each emergency service’s operations; and

(d)

ensure that the responsibility of each service for its primary functions is in no way transferred or modified by the declaration of a state of emergency (staff continue to work under their service’s command structures and established procedures); and

(e)

liaise with and act within the co-ordination and direction of the National Controller, or the appropriate Local Controllers or Group Controllers, when the consequences of an emergency require the response to be co-ordinated through plans and arrangements under the Act; and

(f)

request a declaration of a state of emergency for an affected area via the Local Controller, Group Controller, or National Controller when an officer in charge of an emergency service considers that an emergency has occurred or may occur and emergency powers under the Act will or might be required to co-ordinate, direct, or control a response to that emergency; and

(g)

notify the chief executive or national commander of the emergency service that a liaison has been established for a significant co-ordinated response or declaration of a state of emergency; and

(h)

plan for, and provide, welfare support to staff to enable staff to carry out their functions in response to, and in recovery from, an emergency; and

(i)

participate in readiness planning at the national and CDEM Group level.

New Zealand Police

37 Introduction

(1)

The functions of the New Zealand Police, as described in section 9 of the Policing Act 2008, include—

(a)

keeping the peace:

(b)

maintaining public safety:

(c)

law enforcement:

(d)

crime prevention:

(e)

community support and reassurance:

(f)

national security:

(g)

participation in policing activities outside New Zealand:

(h)

emergency management.

(2)

In addition to the functions of the New Zealand Police under the Policing Act 2008, during an emergency the New Zealand Police will support coroners as required under the Coroners Act 2006 (including developing, maintaining, and implementing the Mass Fatalities Plan).

(3)

By virtue of their day-to-day role as co-ordinators of incidents or emergencies and their 24-hour availability, the New Zealand Police will frequently be required to accept the initial responsibility for co-ordination of an emergency.

(4)

The emergency management plans of the New Zealand Police provide for the smooth transfer of this support role to the appropriate lead agency once that agency is ready.

38 Objective

The objective of the New Zealand Police is to minimise the consequences of an emergency on individuals and the community by carrying out the functions of New Zealand Police under the Policing Act 2008.

39 Principles

(1)

The principles underlying the role of the New Zealand Police are to—

(a)

use, at the discretion of the constable in charge (subject to any direction given by a New Zealand Police operation or tactical commander),—

(i)

the ordinary New Zealand Police powers; and

(ii)

the special powers created by the declaration of a state of emergency; and

(b)

co-ordinate inter-district movement of New Zealand Police personnel in consultation with the National Controller; and

(c)

exercise, when needed, the powers of compulsion under the Act when a state of emergency is in force (including entry onto premises, closing of roads and public places, evacuation, and directing activities); and

(d)

authorise a person, other than a constable, to exercise, when needed, any of the powers of compulsion under the Act when a state of emergency is in force.

(2)

The powers of the New Zealand Police, including those in the Act, are summarised in The Guide.

40 Role of New Zealand Police during reduction and readiness

(1)

The New Zealand Police maintain business continuity plans to ensure that critical New Zealand Police functions can continue during an emergency.

(2)

Those plans identify key risks, prioritise business, plan for the continuance of critical business, and provide for the redeployment of staff in support of other districts.

(3)

New Zealand Police emergency and command planning forms the basis for New Zealand Police operations, including action in a state of emergency, and refers to and integrates with CDEM plans at national, CDEM Group, and local levels.

(4)

The New Zealand Police participate in multi-agency emergency management planning and exercises contributing to a co-ordinated response using the CIMS.

(5)

New Zealand Police emergency management plans also provide for—

(a)

early control of the scene of an emergency, co-ordinating essential services, preserving life, and protecting property; and

(b)

the establishment of a New Zealand Police operations headquarters; and

(c)

the callout of sufficient personnel to meet New Zealand Police requirements; and

(d)

basic procedures for dealing with an emergency, including alerting and liaising with other emergency services; and

(e)

liaison at the appropriate level of the response with other elements.

(6)

The New Zealand Police regularly test and exercise response arrangements and participate in the National CDEM Exercise Programme.

41 Role of New Zealand Police during response and recovery

(1)

The role of the New Zealand Police during the response to and recovery from an emergency is to—

(a)

maintain the functions of the New Zealand Police as outlined in section 9 of the Policing Act 2008 and the Act; and

(b)

assist with the dissemination of warning messages; and

(c)

assist the movement of rescue, medical, fire, and other essential services; and

(d)

co-ordinate movement control over land, including communications and traffic control; and

(e)

conduct category I search and rescue operations; and

(f)

support category II search and rescue operations; and

(g)

carry out disaster victims identification; and

(h)

control access to and within an affected area so as to assist rescue, medical, fire, and other essential services; and

(i)

conduct any initial evacuations to ensure protection of life; and

(j)

co-ordinate inquiries to assist family, whānau, and next of kin to make contact with each other; and

(k)

trace missing persons and notify their next of kin; and

(l)

assist coroners as required by the Coroners Act 2006, in close liaison with the Ministry of Justice and health services; and

(m)

support Controllers at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels and, when requested, appoint New Zealand Police liaison officers to the NCMC, ECCs, and local EOCs.

(2)

To provide for inter-agency co-ordination, the New Zealand Police ensure—

(a)

participation in the development of response and recovery action plans; and

(b)

the national co-ordination of New Zealand Police resources in support of the emergency operations; and

(c)

when requested, the appointment of a New Zealand Police liaison officer to the Controller at the relevant level (national, CDEM Group, local), on an ongoing basis; and

(d)

the exchange of situation reports at respective levels (national, CDEM Group, local).

(3)

The New Zealand Police support coroners to enable them to carry out their functions under section 4 of the Coroners Act 2006, which include—

(a)

deciding whether to carry out a post-mortem; and

(b)

authorising the release of a body; and

(c)

deciding whether to open an inquest; and

(d)

giving the immediate family and representatives of the immediate family of a person thought to be deceased notice of the processes required by law to be performed or followed in relation to the death.

(4)

The New Zealand Police has overall responsibility for the recovery and identification of human remains, will recover deceased persons, and may take them to a temporary holding area before transportation to a mortuary facility.

(5)

The New Zealand Police will liaise closely with the family of the deceased, coroners, iwi authorities, health authorities, funeral directors, and relevant local authorities to ensure that legal, cultural, spiritual, and health-related matters are addressed.

(6)

The New Zealand Police CDEM operations are summarised in The Guide.

Fire services

42 Introduction

The National Commander of the New Zealand Fire Service, working in support of the Director and the National Controller, is responsible for—

(a)

co-ordinating the fire services; and

(b)

providing resources required to undertake requests for assistance.

43 Objective

The objective of the fire services under this plan is to provide services to minimise the consequences of an emergency for people, property, and the environment.

44 Principles

The principles underlying the role of the New Zealand Fire Service in this plan are to—

(a)

plan for, and prepare to fully participate in, the response to any emergency, while at the same time maintaining the capability to deliver its existing operational mandate; and

(b)

work in concert with the requirements of national, CDEM Group, and local CDEM plans; and

(c)

ensure that fire services incident management structures adhere to, or work within, the direction and principles of the current CIMS structure; and

(d)

develop and maintain the capacity to provide an operational response (including incident management, liaison, and advisory support) to CDEM at the national, CDEM Group, and local level; and

(e)

liaise with other members of the fire services to co-ordinate an effective response to an emergency.

45 Role of fire services during reduction and readiness

(1)

The New Zealand Fire Service maintains business continuity plans to ensure that its functions can continue during an emergency.

(2)

Those plans identify key risks, prioritise business, plan for the continuance of critical business, and provide for the redeployment of staff.

(3)

The New Zealand Fire Service emergency and command planning forms the basis for fire services operations, including action in a state of emergency, and refers to and integrates with CDEM plans at national, CDEM Group, and local levels.

(4)

The New Zealand Fire Service participates in multi-agency emergency planning and exercises contributing to a co-ordinated response using the CIMS.

(5)

The New Zealand Fire Service operates and reviews co-ordination schemes between fire brigades in accordance with the Fire Services Act 1975.

46 Role of fire services during response and recovery

(1)

The role of the fire services during the response to and recovery from an emergency includes, subject to arrangements agreed between the fire services in relation to a particular emergency,—

(a)

firefighting to control, contain, and extinguish fires; and

(b)

containing releases and spillages of hazardous substances; and

(c)

urban search and rescue (the New Zealand Fire Service is formally recognised as having a heavy urban search and rescue capability and the ability to co-ordinate urban search and rescue within New Zealand, and the capability to carry out urban search and rescue includes the national support team and urban search and rescue task forces (consisting of technicians, medical staff, engineers, and search dogs)); and

(d)

limiting damage, including the salvage of essential material from endangered locations; and

(e)

redistributing water, in consultation with the relevant territorial authorities, for firefighting.

(2)

On the declaration of a state of emergency, no additional powers or authority are conferred on the fire services (rather, the fire services continue to operate under the relevant sections of their Acts).

(3)

Section 28 of the Fire Service Act 1975 confers authority on the Chief Fire Officer of the relevant fire district, or, if absent, the Deputy Chief Fire Officer, or, in the absence of both, the person who, for the time being, is in charge of a fire incident or other emergency, to direct those under that officer’s control to do whatever is necessary, within reason, for the protection of life and property.

(4)

During an emergency,—

(a)

the Fire Region Commander of the New Zealand Fire Service, or the Fire Region Commander’s designated representative,—

(i)

is responsible to the Local Controllers or the CDEM Group Controllers for the mobilisation, co-ordination, and control of the fire services; and

(ii)

is located, if required, in the ECC, or the EOC; and

(iii)

should maintain communications with the national fire co-ordination centre, inform the Local Controllers or the CDEM Group Controllers of significant incidents, and advise on subsequent actions taken or to be taken; and

(iv)

supports the Local Controllers or the CDEM Group Controllers and is responsible for co-ordinating fire services operations and providing the resources required to undertake requests for assistance; and

(v)

is the fire services adviser to the Local Controllers or the Group Controller; and

(vi)

advises on fire services operations, urban search and rescue priorities, and the resources required to continue operations; and

(b)

the National Commander of the New Zealand Fire Service, or the National Commander’s designated representative,—

(i)

is responsible to the Director and the National Controller for the mobilisation, co-ordination, and control of fire services; and

(ii)

is located, if required, in the NCMC; and

(iii)

should maintain communications with the national fire co-ordination centre, inform the Director and the National Controller of significant incidents, and advise on subsequent actions taken or to be taken; and

(iv)

supports the Director and the National Controller and is responsible for co-ordinating fire services operations and providing the resources required to undertake requests for assistance; and

(v)

advises on fire services operations, urban search and rescue priorities, and the resources required to continue operations.

(5)

Under section 36 of the Forest and Rural Fires Act 1977, principal fire officers of the rural fire authorities have powers to control fires occurring in forest and vegetation within their districts.

(6)

If a regional fire emergency exists under section 39 of the Forest and Rural Fires Act 1977, the National Rural Fire Officer may, in the public interest, take charge or appoint a Principal Rural Fire Officer or other appropriate fire officer to take charge for the duration of the emergency.

(7)

If a state of emergency declaration is proposed in a rural fire authority’s area in response to a rural fire, the appropriate Local Controllers or CDEM Group Controllers will ensure appropriate liaison with the Principal Rural Fire Officer before and after the emergency is declared.

Health and disability services

47 Introduction

(1)

Health and disability services in New Zealand are delivered by a network of organisations and people, including—

(a)

the Minister of Health, who has overall responsibility for New Zealand’s health and disability system; and

(b)

the Ministry of Health, which acts as principal adviser to the Minister of Health and the Government on health and disability policy, and leads and supports the sector to achieve better health for New Zealanders; and

(c)

DHBs, which plan, manage, provide, and purchase services for the population of their district, including primary care, public health services, aged care, and services provided by other non-government health providers; and

(d)

primary health organisations, which provide health care in the community, usually from general practitioners or practice nurses; and

(e)

public health services, which provide environmental health, communicable disease control, and health promotion programmes; and

(f)

ambulance services, which provide pre-hospital care and transport for patients in the community, and inter-hospital transport where patients require referral for specific treatment.

(2)

An emergency may combine a sharp rise and variations in demand for health and disability services with the disruption of facilities and infrastructure, during which—

(a)

there may be pressure on hospitals and other health and disability services and facilities:

(b)

communities may experience public health problems, and those who have suffered loss and disruption may require psychological support:

(c)

hospitals, health and disability services, medical equipment, ambulances, and related facilities or equipment may be damaged.

(3)

Even where a hazard does not directly affect health and disability services or their infrastructure, disruption to other services (for example, roads, electricity, or water supplies) can have serious consequences for their services or infrastructure.

(4)

If staff cannot get to work or lifeline utilities fail, facilities and services may have to be reduced or relocated, or stopped altogether, which may endanger community health and safety.

48 Objective

The objective of the health and disability service providers during an emergency is to provide services to minimise the consequences of the emergency for the health of individuals and the community.

49 Principles

The principles underlying the role of health and disability services during emergencies are to—

(a)

maintain an emergency management structure for the health and disability service providers that enables a consistent and effective response to emergencies at the local, regional, and national levels, and that supports, to the greatest extent possible, the protection of the general population, health and disability services workers, and health and disability services clients; and

(b)

provide services that, to the greatest extent possible, meet the needs of patients and clients and their communities during and after an emergency, even when resources are limited, while ensuring that responses do not create or exacerbate inequalities for particularly vulnerable or hard-to-reach populations; and

(c)

ensure that health and disability services are as resilient to the consequences of hazards and risks as is reasonably practicable.

50 Role of health and disability services during reduction and readiness

(1)

The Director-General of Health, on behalf of the Minister of Health, has overall responsibility for health and disability services in all phases of emergency management.

(2)

The Ministry of Health is responsible for—

(a)

policy development; and

(b)

maintaining the National International Health Regulations Focal Points in accordance with the International Health Regulations (2005); and

(c)

national planning for a health-related emergency; and

(d)

developing, maintaining, and exercising the National Health Emergency Plan and its supporting documents; and

(e)

preparing a business continuity plan for the Ministry of Health.

(3)

DHBs are responsible for—

(a)

leading and co-ordinating local reduction and readiness planning across health and disability service providers within their districts; and

(b)

developing, maintaining, and exercising health emergency plans for significant incidents and emergencies affecting their districts, and co-operating with neighbouring DHBs in the development of inter-DHB, sub-regional, regional, and national emergency plans and capability as appropriate to decide how services will be delivered in an emergency (acknowledging DHBs’ role as both funders and providers of health and disability service providers, including the provision of support directly or indirectly to other affected parts of the country); and

(c)

ensuring that all their plans adequately provide that public, primary, secondary, tertiary, mental, and disability health services require health and disability service providers to have plans and resources in place to ensure that they can respond to an emergency in an integrated and effective manner; and

(d)

ensuring that health and disability services are ready to function to the fullest possible extent during and after an emergency by ensuring—

(i)

the continuity of care for existing patients, the management of increased demand for services (including the provision of surge capacity), and that assistance is provided to enable the recovery of services (including business continuity); and

(ii)

the preparation of plans that are integrated across the sector and that are aligned with the plans of the other emergency services and the regional CDEM Group plan and other response agencies; and

(iii)

that their own planning and responses are integrated with public health planning and responses.

(4)

PHUs and the Ministry of Health have a responsibility to—

(a)

develop plans specific to public health emergencies (for example, pandemics); and

(b)

integrate public health planning and responses; and

(c)

advise local agencies and lifeline utilities about public health aspects of their business continuity planning.

(5)

Land and air ambulance providers are responsible for—

(a)

ensuring the continuity of care for existing patients, the management of increased demand for services (including the provision of surge capacity), and that assistance is provided to enable the recovery of services (including business continuity); and

(b)

preparing incident and emergency management plans that are integrated across the sector and that are aligned with the plans of relevant DHBs, the plans of other emergency services, and CDEM Group plans; and

(c)

integrating their own planning and response with public health planning and response; and

(d)

supporting DHB regional groups and CDEM Groups as required; and

(e)

contributing to emergency management planning led by the Ministry of Health.

(6)

Health and disability service providers are responsible for—

(a)

ensuring the continuity of care for existing patients, the management of increased demand for services (including the provision of surge capacity), and that assistance is provided to enable the recovery of services (including business continuity); and

(b)

preparing incident and emergency management plans that are integrated across the sector and are aligned with the plans of the relevant DHBs, the plans of other emergency services, and CDEM Group plans; and

(c)

integrating their own planning and response with public health planning and response; and

(d)

supporting DHB regional groups and CDEM Groups as required; and

(e)

contributing to emergency management planning led by the Ministry of Health.

51 Role of health and disability services during response and recovery

(1)

In an emergency, DHBs and other health and disability service providers are expected to activate response and recovery plans to minimise the consequences of the emergency on their populations and to maintain services to the fullest practicable extent.

(2)

The Ministry of Health has operational roles, including—

(a)

monitoring any developing emergencies; and

(b)

activating the National Health Emergency Plan and National Health Co-ordination Centre as appropriate; and

(c)

co-ordinating and managing the health and disability service providers’ response to emergencies that have significant regional or national consequences; and

(d)

acting as lead agency in an all-of-government response to a health emergency, such as an epidemic or a pandemic.

(3)

DHBs are responsible for—

(a)

co-ordinating the local health sector response to emergencies; and

(b)

ensuring appropriate co-ordination of all health and disability service providers and close liaison with CDEM Groups and local authorities; and

(c)

continuing their services and managing any increased demand.

(4)

PHUs are responsible for—

(a)

maintaining their services and managing any increased demand; and

(b)

responding to emergencies involving risk to public health; and

(c)

co-ordinating via local DHB EOCs; and

(d)

liaising with the ECC or the local EOC during an emergency.

(5)

Land and air ambulance providers are responsible for—

(a)

continuing their services and managing any increased demand; and

(b)

co-ordinating via local DHB EOCs, the Ambulance National Crisis Co-ordination Centre, the National Health Co-ordination Centre, and other ambulance providers.

(6)

Health and disability service providers are responsible for—

(a)

continuing their services and managing any increased demand; and

(b)

co-ordinating via local DHB EOCs.

New Zealand Defence Force

52 Introduction

(1)

During an emergency, the New Zealand Defence Force is a support agency.

(2)

Given the nature of the New Zealand Defence Force operations, forces can be deployed at short notice to assist with the response.

(3)

The general legal basis for provision of New Zealand Defence Force support to aid to the civil power is provided for in section 9 of the Defence Act 1990.

(4)

Section 9(1)(a) and (b) of the Defence Act 1990 authorises the New Zealand Defence Force to be used in New Zealand or elsewhere to—

(a)

perform any public service; or

(b)

provide assistance to the civil power in a time of emergency.

53 Objective

(1)

The objective of the New Zealand Defence Force is to provide appropriate support to government authorities during an emergency, while maintaining operational outputs and missions.

(2)

This means that all efforts will be made to support the lead agency, taking into account the Government’s priorities; however, the New Zealand Defence Force cannot guarantee that certain resources will always be available, because they may be involved in another Government-directed mission.

54 Principles

(1)

The principles underlying the role of the New Zealand Defence Force are to—

(a)

ensure that New Zealand Defence Force personnel deployed to assist the response to an emergency will remain under military command while the lead agency directs the New Zealand Defence Force units assigned to the response; and

(b)

ensure that requests for New Zealand Defence Force assistance are in the form of a general task or a desired effect rather than a request for a specific resource or piece of equipment; and

(c)

provide, after analysis of the general task or desired effect, the most suitable personnel and equipment to complete the task or achieve the effect.

(2)

In performing general public services or providing assistance, New Zealand Defence Force personnel are not empowered to exercise New Zealand Police powers; however, service personnel are to act to save life in any circumstance, and to act on a specific lawful request by the New Zealand Police.

55 Role of New Zealand Defence Force during readiness

The New Zealand Defence Force undertakes to do the following to ensure that it is sufficiently prepared to respond to an emergency:

(a)

manage business continuity plans at levels that are necessary to ensure that defence functions can continue during and after an emergency; and

(b)

maintain contingency plans for response to an emergency; and

(c)

conduct internal training and participate in exercises at the national level to maintain response proficiency; and

(d)

participate in planning and training sessions with the MCDEM and CDEM Groups.

56 Role of New Zealand Defence Force during response

(1)

During an emergency, the New Zealand Defence Force—

(a)

will provide liaison officers to the NCMC, the ECC, and, if necessary, the local EOC (the liaison officers will advise on potential support operations by the New Zealand Defence Force and provide updates on the progress of any tasks that the New Zealand Defence Force is conducting in the respective areas or levels; however, the liaison officers are not authorised to accept tasks); and

(b)

can utilise certain forces assigned at short notice to support emergencies (forces are held ready for response at the regional and national levels and include land, air, and sea assets as necessary); and

(c)

will co-ordinate New Zealand Defence Force assets at either the local level (ECC) or national level (the NCMC), depending on the type and scale of the emergency and the mode of operation of the NCMC.

(2)

Requests for the support of the New Zealand Defence Force beyond local levels of commitment must be made by the CDEM Groups through the National Controller.

Lifeline utilities

57 Introduction

(1)

Lifeline utilities, as described in the Act, provide essential and enabling infrastructure and services that support commercial and domestic activity.

(2)

Lifeline utilities deliver services (for example, water supply, wastewater and stormwater collection, electricity, gas, and petroleum distribution, telecommunications, broadcasting, and transportation networks, including roads, railways, airports, and ports).

(3)

Lifeline utilities have duties under section 60 of the Act.

58 Objective

The main duty of lifeline utilities during and after an emergency is to be able to deliver the services they normally provide to the fullest possible extent (even though this may be at a reduced level).

59 Principles

The principles underlying the role of lifeline utilities are to—

(a)

identify and understand the full range of hazards and risks and implement reduction strategies; and

(b)

prioritise the continuity of operations and supply of services in accordance with response priorities set by the Local Controller, Group Controller, or National Controller (even though this may be at a reduced level); and

(c)

plan co-operatively with local authorities, CDEM Groups, emergency services, and other lifeline utilities; and

(d)

establish emergency procedures for communication with government agencies, CDEM Groups, emergency services, and other lifeline utilities; and

(e)

identify examples of best practice, and share and apply them where appropriate; and

(f)

facilitate solutions to issues that are sector specific and do not require government assistance and support; and

(g)

develop common and effective approaches to the 4 Rs; and

(h)

co-ordinate with other lifeline utilities to promote service restoration following an emergency; and

(i)

provide information on the status of networks to the EOC, ECC, and NCMC as appropriate.

60 Role of lifeline utilities during reduction and readiness

(1)

To help fulfil their duties under section 60 of the Act, all lifeline utilities are to—

(a)

develop business continuity plans to—

(i)

identify critical assets and business processes, assess their vulnerabilities, and undertake appropriate actions to reduce the risks they face; and

(ii)

outline response and recovery arrangements, including appropriate contracting arrangements with key suppliers; and

(b)

focus on both reduction and readiness, including planning co-operatively with—

(i)

other lifeline utilities (whether or not in the same sector), especially those on which they are dependent; and

(ii)

relevant government agencies; and

(iii)

CDEM Groups; and

(c)

regularly test and exercise their response arrangements and participate in the National CDEM Exercise Programme.

(2)

National lifeline utilities are to—

(a)

work with the MCDEM to prearrange a means of national level sector co-ordination that best suits their sector (this usually entails establishing a single entity that takes responsibility for managing sector readiness, response, and recovery information, which in turn promotes co-ordinated activity); and

(b)

participate in testing of sector co-ordination entity arrangements.

(3)

The MCDEM is responsible for nominating and training National Lifeline Utility Co-ordinators to perform co-ordination functions during readiness, response, and recovery.

(4)

CDEM Groups are responsible for nominating and training CDEM Group Lifeline Utility Co-ordinators to perform co-ordination functions during readiness, response, and recovery, including establishing relationships and sector planning arrangements during reduction and readiness.

61 Role of lifeline utilities during response and recovery

(1)

To help fulfil their duties under section 60 of the Act, all lifeline utilities are to—

(a)

activate business continuity, response, and recovery plans; and

(b)

establish contact through the Lifeline Utility Co-ordinator with the relevant EOC or ECC, or the NCMC, and provide information on the status of their networks and estimated repair times; and

(c)

operate within established CDEM co-ordination mechanisms.

(2)

National lifeline utilities are to co-ordinate at the national level using established sector co-ordination entities.

(3)

Lifeline utilities are to co-ordinate at a regional level using established sector co-ordination entities.

(4)

The MCDEM has responsibility for co-ordinating across sectors at the national level, utilising the National Lifeline Utilities Co-ordinator to perform this function.

(5)

CDEM Groups are to utilise their CDEM Group Lifeline Utilities Co-ordinators to co-ordinate lifeline utilities at the local and regional level.

(6)

Each Lifeline Utilities Co-ordinator, at the CDEM Group and national levels, is to—

(a)

lead the lifeline utility co-ordination operations in their ECC or recovery office and the NCMC or its recovery office; and

(b)

link the lifeline utility co-ordination function at any ECC or its recovery office and the NCMC or its recovery office; and

(c)

provide information and advice to the National Controller or the CDEM Group Controller, or the National Recovery Manager or the CDEM Group Recovery Manager, on the consequences of an emergency and response and recovery priorities; and

(d)

provide information to lifeline utilities or sector co-ordination entities on CDEM priorities.

Welfare services

62 Introduction

(1)

Welfare services support individuals, families and whānau, and communities in being ready for, responding to, and recovering from emergencies, which includes the following welfare services sub-functions:

(a)

registration:

(b)

needs assessment:

(c)

inquiry:

(d)

care and protection services for children and young people:

(e)

psychosocial support:

(f)

household goods and services:

(g)

shelter and accommodation:

(h)

financial assistance:

(i)

animal welfare.

(2)

Effective welfare planning is based on a good understanding of affected communities, including their cultural and demographic makeup, strengths, and vulnerabilities.

(3)

Agencies responsible for the co-ordination of welfare services sub-functions and relevant support agencies are covered in clauses 67 to 75 of this plan.

(4)

The MCDEM is the agency responsible at the national level for the co-ordination across welfare services sub-functions, and it appoints a National Welfare Manager to fulfil this function.

(5)

The MCDEM is responsible for the appointment of suitable and experienced personnel to be alternative National Welfare Managers and for ensuring that training is provided to enable them to co-ordinate the welfare services function during response and recovery.

(6)

Each CDEM Group is responsible for—

(a)

the co-ordination of and arrangements for local delivery of welfare services; and

(b)

the appointment of a suitably senior and experienced CDEM Group Welfare Manager to fulfil that function; and

(c)

the appointment of suitable and experienced personnel to be alternative CDEM Group Welfare Managers and to ensure that training is provided to enable them to co-ordinate the welfare services function during response and recovery.

(7)

Welfare services are delivered at the local level and co-ordinated and supported at the CDEM Group and national levels.

63 Objective

The objective of the welfare services function is to carry out activities across the 4 Rs to provide for the needs of people affected by an emergency and to minimise the consequences of the emergency for individuals, families and whānau, and communities.

64 Principles

The principles applying to the delivery of welfare services are to—

(a)

recognise the diverse and dynamic nature of communities; and

(b)

strengthen self-reliance as the foundation for individual and family and whānau and community resilience; and

(c)

ensure that emergency welfare services address the specific welfare needs of individuals, families and whānau, and communities; and

(d)

ensure flexibility in the services provided and how they are best delivered; and

(e)

integrate and align with local arrangements and existing welfare networks.

65 Role of welfare services agencies during reduction and readiness

(1)

Each agency involved with welfare services responsibilities is to—

(a)

develop and review plans to ensure continuity of its essential services and contribution to wider welfare provision; and

(b)

plan collaboratively with agencies responsible for co-ordinating relevant welfare services sub-functions to ensure that arrangements are aligned; and

(c)

develop capacity and capability relevant to its role in an emergency; and

(d)

establish regular communication and reporting lines within its local, regional, and national offices; and

(e)

establish and maintain inter-agency communications.

(2)

Each agency responsible for co-ordinating welfare services sub-functions is to—

(a)

provide leadership to support agencies to develop arrangements; and

(b)

develop, maintain, and exercise arrangements for the co-ordination or delivery of relevant welfare services sub-functions; and

(c)

plan co-operatively with all support agencies with a role in delivering the relevant welfare services sub-function to ensure that arrangements are aligned; and

(d)

regularly test and exercise its response and recovery arrangements and participate in the National CDEM Exercise Programme; and

(e)

participate as an active member on—

(i)

the NWCG at the national level; and

(ii)

all Welfare Coordination Groups at the CDEM Group level.

(3)

The National Welfare Manager is to—

(a)

co-ordinate the welfare services function during reduction and readiness; and

(b)

chair the NWCG, whose members are the agencies responsible for each of the welfare services sub-functions (the NWCG provides strategic oversight of planning and development of integrated welfare services); and

(c)

in consultation with the NWCG, plan and co-ordinate at the national level the delivery of welfare services across welfare services sub-functions during response and recovery; and

(d)

communicate and report on the progress of readiness activities for the welfare services function to NWCG members, CDEM Groups, and the Director.

(4)

The CDEM Group welfare manager is to—

(a)

co-ordinate the CDEM Group welfare services function during reduction and readiness; and

(b)

chair the CDEM Group’s Welfare Co-ordination Group, whose members are the agencies responsible for each of the welfare services sub-functions in the CDEM Group area; and

(c)

oversee the establishment and maintenance of arrangements and plans for—

(i)

delivery of welfare services at the local level during response and recovery; and

(ii)

co-ordination across welfare services sub-functions during response and recovery; and

(d)

communicate and report on the progress of the readiness activities for the welfare services function to the Co-ordinating Executive Group, Welfare Co-ordination Group members, and the National Welfare Manager.

66 Role of welfare services agencies during response and recovery

(1)

Each agency with welfare services responsibilities is to—

(a)

provide timely services and information on those services to affected communities; and

(b)

identify strategies and actions to support effective co-ordination of services, and monitor and report to the agency that is responsible for the relevant welfare services sub-functions on welfare issues and activities; and

(c)

establish regular communication and reporting lines within its local, regional, and national offices; and

(d)

support the welfare services function with additional personnel at national, CDEM Group, and local levels where a need is identified and it is practicable to do so.

(2)

Each agency responsible for co-ordinating welfare services sub-functions is to,—

(a)

at the national level,—

(i)

work with the relevant support agencies to ensure community needs are being met and that services and information (for operational and public information purposes) are integrated; and

(ii)

collaborate with other agencies with responsibility for the co-ordination of other welfare services sub-functions; and

(iii)

report on the relevant welfare services sub-function for which it is responsible to the National Welfare Manager in the NCMC during response or the National Recovery Office during recovery; and

(b)

at the CDEM Group level,—

(i)

work with relevant support agencies to ensure that community needs are being met and that services and information (for both operational and public information purposes) are integrated; and

(ii)

collaborate with other agencies that are responsible for other welfare services sub-functions to ensure that services and information are co-ordinated, integrated, and aligned to meet community needs; and

(iii)

report on the co-ordination and performance of the welfare services sub-function for which it is responsible to the CDEM Group welfare manager in the ECC during response or the CDEM Group recovery office during recovery.

(3)

National welfare co-ordination is provided when a CDEM Group considers that national support would be beneficial, when multiple CDEM Groups are affected, or when the National Controller determines that national co-ordination is required.

(4)

At the national level, during response and recovery, the National Welfare Manager is responsible for co-ordination of the welfare services function.

(5)

The National Welfare Manager is to—

(a)

be responsible to the National Controller during response or to the National Recovery Manager during recovery for co-ordination of the delivery of welfare services; and

(b)

co-ordinate the agencies responsible for welfare services sub-functions during response and recovery to ensure that the delivery of services and information is integrated and aligned to meet community needs; and

(c)

co-ordinate with CDEM Group Welfare Managers at ECCs during response or the CDEM Group recovery office during recovery; and

(d)

co-ordinate and integrate national welfare activities with other functions and activities in support of the National Controller during response and the National Recovery Manager during recovery; and

(e)

communicate and report on the provision of welfare services and provide advice to the National Controller.

(6)

At the CDEM Group level, during response and recovery, the CDEM Group Welfare Manager is responsible for co-ordination of the welfare services function.

(7)

The CDEM Group Welfare Manager is to—

(a)

be responsible to the Group Controller in response or the CDEM Group Recovery Manager during recovery for co-ordination of the delivery of services; and

(b)

co-ordinate the agencies responsible for welfare services sub-functions during response and recovery to ensure that the delivery of services and information are integrated and aligned to meet community needs; and

(c)

co-ordinate with local welfare managers (where these arrangements exist) at local EOCs during response or the local recovery office during recovery; and

(d)

co-ordinate and integrate their CDEM Group welfare activities with other ECC functions and activities in support of the Group Controller; and

(e)

communicate and report on the provision of welfare services and provide advice to the Group Controller; and

(f)

co-ordinate with the National Welfare Manager and other CDEM Group Welfare Managers to ensure consistent and co-ordinated delivery of welfare services and information to affected communities; and

(g)

be capable of assisting in welfare services co-ordination at any ECC or, if requested, the NCMC.

67 Registration

(1)

Registration involves collecting information from people to identify who has been directly affected by an emergency and may require emergency welfare services.

(2)

Registration information informs the needs assessment sub-function and can be used to support the inquiry sub-function.

(3)

At the national level, the MCDEM is the agency responsible for the provision of the CDEM welfare registration system for registering people who are affected by an emergency and who may require emergency welfare services.

(4)

At the CDEM Group level, CDEM Groups are responsible for registering people who have been affected by an emergency and who may require emergency welfare services.

68 Needs assessment

(1)

At the national level, the MCDEM is the agency responsible for providing advice and co-ordinating the needs assessment sub-function.

(2)

Needs assessment includes the provision of a system to assist with meeting immediate and ongoing welfare needs, and co-ordinating the actions required to meet those needs, in an integrated and flexible way.

(3)

At the national level, the MCDEM provides a system to facilitate the collection of data to inform the assessment of immediate and ongoing welfare needs.

(4)

At the national level, support from the following agencies may be required to plan for and co-ordinate an integrated approach to needs assessment:

(a)

the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, in co-ordination with foreign diplomatic missions accredited to New Zealand, to provide information and advice on foreign nationals; and

(b)

the Ministry of Health, to co-ordinate a national health service response, including health personnel, and to provide advice on specific human health and disability issues; and

(c)

the Ministry for Primary Industries, to co-ordinate information—

(i)

provided by rural support trusts and other stakeholder networks about identified needs on farms and in rural communities; and

(ii)

about animal welfare; and

(d)

the Ministry of Social Development, to determine eligibility for—

(i)

financial assistance; and

(ii)

temporary accommodation for displaced persons; and

(e)

the New Zealand Police, to co-ordinate inquiries and provide information; and

(f)

the Office for Disability Issues, to provide information and advice in support of the co-ordination of assistance to people with disabilities; and

(g)

Te Puni Kōkiri (national and regional offices), to work with other government agencies and CDEM Groups to facilitate and co-ordinate support to Māori who require assistance, and to engage with iwi, hapū, whānau, and Māori communities to ensure that their needs are met; and

(h)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to co-ordinate the provision of trained New Zealand Red Cross personnel to support community-based needs assessment and outreach; and

(i)

the Salvation Army, to co-ordinate the provision of its trained personnel to support community-based needs assessment and outreach; and

(j)

St John, to co-ordinate the provision of ambulance personnel to support the Ministry of Health response to welfare services; and

(k)

Victim Support, to co-ordinate the provision of trained support workers and personnel to support community-based needs assessment and outreach.

(5)

At the CDEM Group level, CDEM Groups are responsible for co-ordinating the needs assessment sub-function, including—

(a)

collating and analysing identified welfare needs; and

(b)

working with support agencies, including community-based organisations and networks, to identify and deliver appropriately integrated services and information to address welfare needs.

(6)

At the CDEM Group level, support from the following agencies may be required to provide the following services:

(a)

DHBs, to co-ordinate a regional health service response, including health personnel and the assessment of health and disability requirements; and

(b)

the Ministry for Primary Industries,—

(i)

to identify needs on farms and in rural communities through rural support trusts and other stakeholder networks; and

(ii)

to identify animal welfare needs; and

(c)

the Ministry of Social Development, to determine eligibility for—

(i)

financial assistance; and

(ii)

temporary accommodation for displaced persons; and

(d)

the New Zealand Police, to co-ordinate inquiries and provide information; and

(e)

Te Puni Kōkiri (national and regional offices), to work with other government agencies and CDEM Groups to facilitate and co-ordinate support to Māori who require assistance, and to engage with iwi, hapū, whānau, and Māori communities to ensure that their needs are met; and

(f)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to provide trained New Zealand Red Cross personnel to support community-based needs assessment and outreach; and

(g)

the Salvation Army, to provide its trained personnel to support community-based needs assessment and outreach; and

(h)

St John, to co-ordinate the provision of ambulance personnel to support the regional health response to welfare needs, in consultation with the Ministry of Health and DHBs; and

(i)

Victim Support, to provide trained personnel to support community-based needs assessment and outreach.

69 Inquiry

(1)

Inquiry involves identifying people who have been affected by an emergency and assisting family, whānau, and significant others to make contact.

(2)

The New Zealand Police is the agency responsible for a process to co-ordinate inquiries.

(3)

At the national level, the following agencies are required to plan for and support the New Zealand Police to facilitate the inquiry process:

(a)

the MCDEM, as the agency responsible for the provision of the CDEM welfare registration system; and

(b)

the Ministry of Education, as the agency responsible for providing enrolment information (when legally able to do so) to the New Zealand Police about the current location of children and their families who have been affected by an emergency; and

(c)

the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, as the agency responsible for the provision of information about foreign nationals; and

(d)

the Ministry of Health, via contracts with DHBs and primary care and ambulance services, as the agency responsible for patient registration; and

(e)

the New Zealand Red Cross, for the provision of an international tracing facility through International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies partners.

(4)

At the CDEM Group level, the following agencies are required to plan for, and support the New Zealand Police to facilitate, the inquiry process:

(a)

CDEM Groups, using the CDEM welfare registration system; and

(b)

DHBs and primary care and ambulance services, to ensure that patient management systems are maintained and available for inquiry purposes using the National Health Index system (which allows interrogation and enables restricted information to be shared with agencies, such as the New Zealand Police, when requested); and

(c)

the Ministry of Education, to provide (when legally able to do so) information to the New Zealand Police that will assist in identifying children and their families who have been affected by an emergency.

70 Care and protection services for children and young people

(1)

At the national and CDEM Group levels, the Ministry of Social Development, through Child, Youth and Family, is the agency responsible for planning the delivery and co-ordination of statutory care and protection services to those children and young people who have been identified (after registration) as being separated from their parents, legal guardians, or usual caregivers during an emergency.

(2)

To provide these services, support from the following agencies at both the national and CDEM Group levels may be required:

(a)

the Ministry of Education, to work with education providers to ensure continuity of care to children and young people at educational facilities during an emergency (a handover of care to the New Zealand Police, or another appropriate agency, will occur for those children and young people who cannot be reunited with their parent, guardian, or other approved person within a reasonable time frame); and

(b)

the New Zealand Police, as the agency responsible for a process to co-ordinate inquiries (where inquiries have been made by responding agencies in relation to establishing contact between a child or young person and their family, whānau, or usual caregiver and have not been successful, and the child’s or young person’s physical or mental well-being is, or is likely to be, impaired, the New Zealand Police will exercise their powers under section 48 (unaccompanied children and young persons) of the Children, Young Persons, and Their Families Act 1989); and

(c)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to support and supervise unaccompanied children during emergencies, as required, and to notify the New Zealand Police as soon as practicable; and

(d)

Te Puni Kōkiri (national and regional offices), to provide independent advice and support to iwi, hapū, whānau, and other Māori communities and to work with central and local government authorities to reconnect tamariki and rangatahi who have become separated from their usual carers during an emergency.

71 Psychosocial support

(1)

The Ministry of Health is the agency responsible for co-ordinating the provision of psychosocial support at the national level, and is to provide the required health services by funding, planning, and providing services, including by contracting organisations.

(2)

Psychosocial support following an emergency involves focusing on the psychological and social interventions that will support community recovery.

(3)

At the national level, support from the following agencies may be required to co-ordinate the following services:

(a)

the Ministry of Education, to support schools and early childhood providers during the emergency or traumatic incident by working alongside the traumatic incident teams or management teams of those schools and providers to assist them in responding to an emergency or incident and implementing an emergency response plan; and

(b)

the Ministry for Primary Industries, to fund rural support trusts and other organisations to provide psychosocial support to rural communities after an emergency that affects the primary industry sector and that meets the Ministry’s funding criteria; and

(c)

the Ministry of Social Development, to provide information and resources to help individuals, families and whānau, and communities to connect to psychosocial support providers; and

(d)

Te Puni Kōkiri (national and regional offices), to provide—

(i)

links to iwi and Māori providers (which can give psychosocial support and work with government agencies, local authorities, and CDEM Groups to ensure that Māori and others are supported); and

(ii)

advice on the most appropriate cultural responses to support Māori affected by an emergency; and

(e)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to provide psychological first aid during emergencies and ongoing psychosocial and bereavement support services as required throughout recovery; and

(f)

the Salvation Army, to provide psychosocial support, including pastoral support, from trained teams; and

(g)

Victim Support, to facilitate access to approved counsellors (who will provide direct support to affected persons during and after an emergency).

(4)

At the CDEM Group level, DHBs are responsible for co-ordinating the provision of psychosocial support services (DHBs advise non-government organisations and primary health organisations on the type and nature of services needed for ongoing psychosocial support).

(5)

At the CDEM Group level, support from the following agencies may be required to provide the following services:

(a)

DHBs, to provide specialist public health, mental health, and addiction services; and

(b)

primary health organisations, to provide general practice and primary care services; and

(c)

the Ministry of Education, to support schools and early childhood providers during an emergency or a traumatic incident by working alongside the traumatic incident teams or management teams of those schools and providers to assist them in responding to the emergency or incident and implementing an emergency response plan; and

(d)

the Ministry for Primary Industries, to fund rural support trusts and other organisations to provide psychosocial support to rural communities following an emergency that affects the primary industry sector and that meets the Ministry’s funding criteria; and

(e)

the Ministry of Social Development, to provide information and resources to help individuals, families and whānau, and communities to connect to psychosocial support providers; and

(f)

Te Puni Kōkiri (national and regional offices), to provide—

(i)

links to iwi and Māori providers (which can give psychosocial support and work with government agencies, local authorities, and CDEM Groups to ensure that Māori and others are supported); and

(ii)

advice on the most appropriate cultural responses to support Māori affected by an emergency; and

(g)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to provide psychological first aid during emergencies and ongoing psychosocial and bereavement support services as required throughout recovery; and

(h)

the Salvation Army, to provide psychosocial support, including pastoral support, from trained teams; and

(i)

Victim Support, to provide access in an emergency to trained support workers who deliver direct emotional and practical support, information, and personal advocacy to affected persons during and after emergencies, crime, and trauma, and to facilitate access to approved counsellors as required; and

(j)

community-based organisations and networks to assist affected persons to connect with social support and services; and

(k)

agencies and organisations that provide employee assistance programmes, to consider what support those agencies and organisations require in an emergency.

72 Household goods and services

(1)

At the national level, the MCDEM is the agency responsible for providing advice and co-ordinating the provision of household goods and services and other essential items (including food, water, groceries, medication, cooking fuel, clothing, bedding, sanitation, and pet food) to people who have been displaced or who are sheltering in place.

(2)

At the national level, the following is a selection of agencies that may be required to co-ordinate advice and assistance on the provision of specific services:

(a)

the Ministry of Health, to provide advice on health considerations; and

(b)

the Ministry for Primary Industries, to provide advice on food safety; and

(c)

the New Zealand Defence Force, to provide advice on the co-ordination of the provision and distribution of water, food, and other essential items (including sanitation facilities); and

(d)

the New Zealand Food & Grocery Council Incorporated, to provide advice on the provision and distribution of food and grocery items; and

(e)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to provide advice on the distribution of water, food, and other essential items; and

(f)

the Salvation Army, to support the distribution of household goods and services, especially food, clothing, and furnishings.

(3)

At the CDEM Group level, CDEM Groups are responsible for planning and co-ordinating the provision of household goods and services and other essential items to people who have been displaced or who are sheltering in place.

(4)

At the CDEM Group level, support from the following agencies may be required to provide the following services:

(a)

DHBs, to provide medication and other items to support primary care and pharmacies and PHUs (supported by territorial authority environmental health officers), and to provide advice on public health issues; and

(b)

local authorities, to procure, and co-ordinate the distribution of, household goods and services; and

(c)

the Ministry for Primary Industries, to provide advice on food safety; and

(d)

the New Zealand Defence Force, to support the provision and distribution of water, food, and other essential items (including sanitation facilities); and

(e)

the New Zealand Food & Grocery Council Incorporated, to provide advice on the provision and distribution of food and grocery items; and

(f)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to support the distribution of household goods and services; and

(g)

the Salvation Army, to support the distribution of household goods and services, especially food, clothing, and furnishings.

73 Shelter and accommodation

(1)

The provision of shelter and accommodation is for people who have to leave their homes as a result of an emergency (displaced people).

(2)

This sub-function is divided into the following categories:

(a)

shelter, provided, usually in a communal facility (possibly, but not necessarily, a pre-designated civil defence centre), for only a few days to protect displaced people from the elements and danger (some basic welfare services may be provided at the facility); and

(b)

emergency accommodation, provided to displaced people who cannot return to their homes for short periods, generally only a few days and not more than about 2 weeks; and

(c)

temporary accommodation, provided to displaced people who cannot return to their homes for a prolonged period (generally several weeks, months, or, possibly, years).

(3)

At the national level, the MCDEM is the agency responsible for providing advice and co-ordinating the provision of shelter and emergency accommodation.

(4)

The Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment is the agency responsible for the co-ordination of the provision of temporary accommodation, in particular,—

(a)

planning in advance for service delivery and technical support systems; and

(b)

prompting information gathering and analysis to ascertain the likely temporary accommodation demand and the most appropriate supply options for the affected populations; and

(c)

encouraging operational partnerships at both national and CDEM Group level for successful implementation of temporary accommodation plans.

(5)

Support from the following agencies is required to plan for and co-ordinate the provision of shelter and accommodation services:

(a)

CDEM Groups,—

(i)

to assess, within their CDEM Group area, the need for shelter and emergency accommodation for displaced people, including displaced people from another region; and

(ii)

to co-ordinate the provision of shelter and emergency accommodation within their CDEM Group area for displaced people, including displaced people from another region; and

(iii)

to provide the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment with advice, information, and access to council-controlled temporary accommodation facility options; and

(b)

Housing New Zealand Corporation, to provide the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment with advice, information, and access to Housing New Zealand Corporation temporary accommodation options (buildings and landholdings); and

(c)

the Ministry of Education, to link CDEM Groups with appropriate school boards of trustees for advice, information, and access to shelter or emergency accommodation options (buildings and landholdings); and

(d)

the Ministry of Health, to link CDEM Groups or the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment, or both, with DHBs for advice and information about managing any environmental health or communicable disease risks to public health associated with shelter, emergency accommodation, and temporary accommodation facilities; and

(e)

the Ministry of Social Development, to determine eligibility for temporary accommodation for displaced persons; and

(f)

the New Zealand Defence Force, to provide the MCDEM, CDEM Groups, and the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment with advice, information, and access to shelter, emergency accommodation, and temporary accommodation options (buildings and landholdings) in accordance with section 9 of the Defence Act 1990; and

(g)

Te Puni Kōkiri national and regional offices, to provide—

(i)

advice and assistance to CDEM Groups to link with marae that can assist with shelter and emergency accommodation and manaakitanga (care and support); and

(ii)

advice to the Ministry of Social Development so that appropriate assessments of needs are undertaken for temporary accommodation for displaced Māori; and

(iii)

advice and assistance to the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment so that appropriate matching and placement case management for temporary accommodation for displaced Māori are undertaken; and

(iv)

advice and assist the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment to link with marae and appropriate marae trustees for advice, information, and access to marae temporary accommodation options (buildings and landholdings); and

(h)

the Salvation Army, to provide CDEM Groups with advice, information, and access to Salvation Army shelter and emergency accommodation, and to support displaced people living in shelter or emergency accommodation.

74 Financial assistance

(1)

The Ministry of Social Development is the agency responsible at the national and CDEM Group levels for the co-ordination of the financial assistance sub-function.

(2)

The Ministry of Social Development co-ordinates the provision of information about, and access to, the range of financial assistance available to people affected by an emergency.

(3)

At the national level, support from the following agencies may be required to plan for and co-ordinate the following services:

(a)

the Accident Compensation Corporation, to ensure—

(i)

claimants who are unable to work because of a covered injury receive, or continue to receive, weekly compensation payments (in lieu of their salary); and

(ii)

the continuation of payments to treatment providers or the deferral of levy payments in certain circumstances; and

(b)

the Earthquake Commission, to provide information about—

(i)

claim lodgement and the settlement processes for natural disaster damage as defined in the Earthquake Commission Act 1993; and

(ii)

settlement of valid claims under the Earthquake Commission Act 1993 by way of payment, reinstatement, or replacement at the Earthquake Commission’s discretion; and

(c)

the Inland Revenue Department, to provide tax relief and income assistance through a range of measures; and

(d)

the Insurance Council of New Zealand, to provide specific disaster recovery information to assist with minimising loss, information on how to lodge insurance claims, and insurance company contacts; and

(e)

the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment, to help businesses to recover by providing information and support; and

(f)

the Ministry for Primary Industries, to provide, after an emergency affecting primary industry sector producers, on-farm relief that meets the Ministry’s funding criteria; and

(g)

the New Zealand Red Cross, to manage a national relief appeal and financial support services in the form of an independent relief or recovery cash grant process; and

(h)

the Salvation Army, to manage a relief appeal to assist affected persons in the most appropriate way.

(4)

At the CDEM Group level, support may be required by the following organisations:

(a)

local authorities,—

(i)

to participate in a disaster relief fund trust (if such a trust has been established in the region); and

(ii)

to manage and administer mayoral relief funds; and

(b)

the Accident Compensation Corporation,—

(i)

to provide compensation to claimants with a covered injury as a result of the emergency; and

(ii)

to ensure the continuation of payments to treatment providers or the deferral of levy payments in certain circumstances; and

(c)

the Earthquake Commission, to provide information about—

(i)

claim lodgement and the settlement processes for natural disaster damage as defined in the Earthquake Commission Act 1993; and

(ii)

settlement of valid claims under the Earthquake Commission Act 1993 by way of payment, reinstatement, or replacement at the Earthquake Commission’s discretion; and

(d)

the Inland Revenue Department, to deliver tax relief and income assistance; and

(e)

the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment, to help businesses to recover by providing information and support; and

(f)

the Ministry for Primary Industries, to provide, after an emergency affecting primary industry sector producers, on-farm relief that meets the Ministry’s funding criteria; and

(g)

the Salvation Army, to manage a relief financial appeal to assist affected persons in the most appropriate way; and

(h)

community-based organisations and networks, to assist affected persons to connect with financial assistance and services.

(5)

Depending on the consequences of an emergency, the Government may authorise extra measures of assistance.

75 Animal welfare

(1)

All animal owners, or persons in charge of animals, should develop their own plans to care for their animals during emergencies.

(2)

At the national and CDEM Group levels, the Ministry for Primary Industries is the agency responsible for—

(a)

co-ordinating the provision of the animal welfare services sub-function (including animal rescue, animal shelter, food, water, husbandry, and veterinary care and other essentials) for all animals, including companion animals, production animals, animals in research, testing, and teaching facilities, zoo and circus animals, and wildlife; and

(b)

co-ordinating the planning for animal welfare in emergencies; and

(c)

maintaining the Government’s reporting and advisory capability on animal welfare in an emergency.

(3)

To provide those services, support from the following agencies at both the national and CDEM Group levels may be required:

(a)

Federated Farmers of New Zealand, to provide direct support and co-ordination services to commercial livestock owners to assist in mitigating animal suffering as a result of an emergency; and

(b)

the New Zealand Companion Animal Council, to provide support services to companion animal owners to assist in mitigating animal suffering as a result of an emergency and returning animals to their owners; and

(c)

the New Zealand Veterinary Association,—

(i)

to provide advice on where veterinary treatment can be obtained; and

(ii)

to provide assistance in alleviating animal suffering through the co-ordination of the provision of advice, feeding, relocation, or sheltering of animals during and after an emergency; and

(iii)

to co-ordinate the provision of trained veterinary personnel to assist in affected areas; and

(iv)

to ensure rapid communication of relevant information to veterinary members and branches, especially to and from affected areas; and

(d)

the Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, to provide direct support and co-ordination services to companion animal owners to assist in mitigating animal suffering as a result of an emergency; and

(e)

territorial authorities, through animal control or animal services, to provide direct support and co-ordination services to companion animal owners to assist with the care, relocation, and housing of companion animals, and other animals, in response to an emergency; and

(f)

World Animal Protection, which may provide support in the event of a national emergency, if formally requested, in the form of an animal emergency management response (which could take the form of veterinary support, help with setting up and running temporary animal shelters, and provision of animal food).

(4)

Additional agencies listed in The Guide may be required at the national and CDEM Group level to provide animal welfare services.

(5)

The Ministry for Primary Industries will advise local authorities on the disposal of dead animals.

(6)

Medical officers of health and health protection officers will advise local authorities on the public health issues that may result from the death and disposal of animals.

Building management

76 Introduction

(1)

Buildings provide for safety, economic and social well-being, and lifeline utilities services.

(2)

The Building Act 2004 and subordinate instruments aim to ensure the effective structural and functional performance of buildings and structures, and the safety of people in and around them (which includes ensuring that buildings are not constructed on land known to pose a hazard).

(3)

Building management requires having co-ordinated readiness, response, and recovery arrangements in place that involve building owners, territorial authorities, CDEM Groups, agencies, and building professionals.

77 Objective

The objective of building management in an emergency is to—

(a)

protect life and promote safety within and in the vicinity of each building; and

(b)

minimise damage to and loss of property; and

(c)

restore building functions as soon as possible to minimise social and economic consequences of the emergency; and

(d)

minimise losses or disruption of lifeline utility services that are in or near any building.

78 Principles

The principles underlying building management are to—

(a)

adhere to the relevant statutory requirements (including the provisions of the Building Act 2004, because it provides the primary means of reducing the risk to people in and near buildings that may arise during an emergency, enabling people to use buildings without unduly endangering their well-being); and

(b)

understand that managing buildings in an emergency is best achieved through efficient and effective management of each building and stocks of buildings on an ongoing basis; and

(c)

encourage all agencies and individuals involved in building management to plan for readiness and to maintain arrangements that enable collaborative responses in an emergency; and

(d)

ensure that building professionals have demonstrable levels of competence, capability, and understanding of their responsibilities in undertaking readiness and response roles to manage buildings in an emergency; and

(e)

use common methods and standards for collecting and communicating information on the safety and functional status of buildings to assist building management in an emergency at national, CDEM Group, and local levels; and

(f)

ensure that agencies, CDEM Groups, and territorial authorities that lead aspects of building management in an emergency provide timely information to affected communities, building owners, and occupiers; and

(g)

encourage, as part of readiness, each territorial authority to collect information for each building, including information on—

(i)

its precise location, form and materials of construction, age, use, occupancy, heritage value, and earthquake-proneness; and

(ii)

any known critical structural weaknesses; and

(iii)

any critical lifeline utility services located in or near it; and

(iv)

its ownership and management arrangements.

79 Management of buildings during reduction and readiness

(1)

Building developers and owners are responsible for ensuring that buildings are designed, constructed, managed, and maintained in accordance with applicable statutory requirements to reduce risks.

(2)

Each employer has a general duty under the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 to take all practicable steps to ensure the safety of employees while at work, including developing procedures for dealing with emergencies that may affect the workplace (persons controlling a workplace have duties to manage hazards that extend to non-employees while those non-employees are legitimately at or in the vicinity of the workplace).

(3)

Under the Building Act 2004, a territorial authority, within its district, is to—

(a)

maintain the means to ensure compliance with building regulations for reducing risk; and

(b)

develop and implement a policy on earthquake-prone buildings in accordance with section 131 of the Building Act 2004; and

(c)

develop and maintain arrangements, in accordance with national guidelines and procedures, for assessments, evaluations, and steps to be undertaken for managing risks to and uncertainties as to the safety of buildings in response to and recovery from an emergency.

(4)

The Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment is to—

(a)

manage the setting of national building standards, codes, and assurance processes that address the risks of hazards; and

(b)

plan for the national co-ordination of building management in an emergency in consultation with the agencies, professional bodies, and members of the private sector that have roles, responsibilities, and interests in this regard; and

(c)

co-ordinate the following building management functions:

(i)

the training and qualification of building professionals who are able to assess buildings during and after an emergency; and

(ii)

the maintenance of rapid building-assessment processes; and

(iii)

the maintenance of arrangements for mobilising and demobilising trained rapid building assessors and detailed-engineering evaluators; and

(iv)

the maintenance of arrangements for mobilising and demobilising volunteer rapid building assessors; and

(v)

the maintenance of sufficient capability of assessors nationally to enable timely support to 1 or more CDEM Groups when local capabilities are exceeded.

(5)

The Ministry for Culture and Heritage, in consultation with the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment, is to provide cultural and heritage policy advice to the Government as requested.

(6)

The Earthquake Commission may facilitate research and education about—

(a)

natural hazards and risks, and methods to avoid and reduce them; and

(b)

the insurance arrangements that it provides for residential buildings.

(7)

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga may advise territorial authorities and owners of buildings about risks to, and the conservation of, heritage features and values.

80 Management of buildings during response and recovery

(1)

As the building consenting authority for the affected area in its district, each territorial authority is, as necessary,—

(a)

to lead rapid building assessments (further information is contained in The Guide); and

(b)

to take steps to manage the safety of people in and near a building, either in accordance with directions of the National Controller, Group Controller, or Local Controller during a state of emergency or in line with its functions under the Building Act 2004 in any other emergency, including, as applicable,—

(i)

cordoning; and

(ii)

carrying out stabilisation work and barricading; and

(iii)

carrying out demolitions and setting up partial demolition cordoning; and

(iv)

requiring the mandatory evacuation of a building or the area around a building when necessary under section 86 of the Act; and

(c)

to fulfil its responsibilities under the Act and the Building Act 2004, including facilitating the efficient and effective recovery of building functions; and

(d)

to have, in carrying out the actions specified in paragraphs (a) to (c), regard to priorities for the preservation and restoration of lifeline utility services in the affected area.

(2)

A CDEM Group, during an emergency affecting its area,—

(a)

is to co-ordinate building management activities within the area; and

(b)

may request national-level support from the National Controller when local capability is exceeded.

(3)

The Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment is to—

(a)

provide national co-ordination of building management support to a CDEM Group when requested by the Director or the National Controller; and

(b)

lead rapid building assessment functions in a state of national emergency; and

(c)

advise and report on operational building management needs and options to the Director or the National Controller; and

(d)

provide building management policy advice to the Government as requested; and

(e)

lead the securing and management of compromised building sites for forensic investigations; and

(f)

advise the Government, during recovery after an emergency, on the requirements for facilitating the efficient and effective recovery of building stock and functions.

(4)

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga may—

(a)

assist CDEM Groups and territorial authorities in identifying and managing risks to heritage buildings and sites from hazards that may arise during an emergency; and

(b)

provide advice and support to the National Controller, the Group Controller, or the Local Controller (as the case may be) and the appropriate territorial authority on matters relating to heritage during response and recovery operations.

(5)

The Ministry for Culture and Heritage, in consultation with the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment, is to provide cultural and heritage policy advice to the Government as requested.

(6)

The Earthquake Commission—

(a)

is to assist, as first loss insurer, with the repair or replacement of residential buildings; and

(b)

may provide information and support to assist other agencies and CDEM Groups in assessing damage to residential buildings, and the consequential welfare and temporary accommodation needs of the resident populations; and

(c)

is to provide advice to Government on matters relevant to its functions.

Science and research organisations

81 Introduction

(1)

Knowledge, information, and advice services are provided to agencies and CDEM Groups by universities, Crown research institutes, private organisations, and international networks.

(2)

Improving the co-ordination, promotion, and accessibility of science and research is fundamental to CDEM.

(3)

The Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment co-ordinates Crown-funded research in support of the National CDEM Strategy’s goals and objectives.

(4)

Those arrangements aim to build research capacity that—

(a)

enables avoidance or mitigation of risks that have potential for significant consequences for New Zealand’s economy, environment, or social well-being; and

(b)

develops community, organisational, and infrastructural resilience to those consequences; and

(c)

supports the dissemination of knowledge and advice, and their application by CDEM practitioners.

(5)

The Earthquake Commission, under the Earthquake Commission Act 1993, may facilitate research and education regarding natural hazards, the means of reducing the impact of natural hazards, and improving emergency management practices.

(6)

Science and research providers also undertake public and privately contracted research services involving other funding sources in support of CDEM.

(7)

In readiness for, and response to, an emergency, the science and research organisations may assist with—

(a)

hazard monitoring; and

(b)

the provision of hazard and risk information; and

(c)

scientific advice to agencies managing an emergency; and

(d)

public information on hazards and risks and safety measures.

82 Objective

The objective of science and research organisations is to provide evidence-based advice to support agencies and CDEM Groups carrying out CDEM at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels across the 4 Rs.

83 Principles

The principles underlying the role of science and research organisations are to—

(a)

consider all hazards and risks to New Zealand and societal resilience and vulnerability factors, including variability in those factors over time; and

(b)

provide for long-term basic targeted research and short-term applied research that meet identified end-user needs; and

(c)

actively develop and maintain appropriate research capabilities to a high standard; and

(d)

acknowledge the need for, and work towards, collaborative efforts to maximise the societal benefits from publicly funded research; and

(e)

endeavour to make research outputs widely known and to assist with their transfer and application as relevant for CDEM throughout New Zealand.

84 Role of science and research organisations during reduction and recovery

Research is carried out at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels, and through international collaboration, to help communities and decision makers to—

(a)

identify, understand, and communicate information on hazards; and

(b)

determine acceptable levels of risk; and

(c)

develop and implement effective means to avoid or mitigate risks; and

(d)

understand hazards and the management of their consequences; and

(e)

carry out recovery activities, including, as appropriate, reducing ongoing risks; and

(f)

monitor and review CDEM processes and outcomes.

85 Role of science and research organisations during readiness and response

(1)

Lead and support agencies may access a range of science and research organisations during an emergency to provide definitive scientific advice or to communicate risk (those organisations include universities, Crown research institutes, and private organisations).

(2)

GNS Science—

(a)

manages the GeoNet system for the detection of earthquakes, land movement, volcanic activity, and the potential for local-source tsunamis; and

(b)

assesses the threat of tsunamis with the support of a multi-agency tsunami experts panel; and

(c)

provides advice to the MCDEM on the issuing of national advisories and warnings about geological hazards; and

(d)

provides scientific advice to the NCMC, agencies, and CDEM Groups as needed; and

(e)

contributes to the management of public information on geological hazards and associated emergencies.

(3)

The Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited—

(a)

maintains a weather forecasting service and issues weather warnings to the public; and

(b)

contributes to the management of public information about weather hazards and associated emergencies; and

(c)

issues, as necessary, volcanic ash advisories for the civil aviation industry; and

(d)

provides scientific advice to the NCMC, agencies, and CDEM Groups as needed.

(4)

Regional councils and some territorial authorities monitor rainfall, lake and river levels, and volumetric flows for flood prediction and management.

(5)

National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited—

(a)

provides public information on—

(i)

climatic and seasonal risks (including drought); and

(ii)

marine geological, seafloor, and coastal hazards and processes; and

(b)

provides scientific advice to the NCMC, agencies, and CDEM Groups as needed; and

(c)

provides representatives on the tsunami experts panel.

(6)

The Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment, during and after an emergency, may take additional steps to—

(a)

integrate consistent and coherent scientific advice to agencies and CDEM Groups; and

(b)

divert existing funding or allocate new funding to ensure that the appropriate technical resources in core physical and social science, engineering, and risk management are available nationally to support the needs of agencies and CDEM Groups.

Part 6 Reduction

86 Introduction

Reduction involves identifying and analysing risks to life and property from hazards, taking steps to eliminate those risks if practicable, and, if not, reducing the magnitude of their impact and the likelihood of their occurrence to an acceptable level.

87 Objective

The objective of reduction is to take preventive steps to avoid or mitigate adverse consequences.

88 Principles

The principles underlying reduction are to—

(a)

achieve acceptable levels of risk through sustainable and practicable reduction measures to provide the best long-term solutions; and

(b)

reduce the risks to communities from hazards, including a combination of the following measures:

(i)

modifying factors that affect the likelihood of an emergency where practicable to do so; and

(ii)

modifying factors that affect exposure and vulnerability to consequences before, during, and after an emergency; and

(iii)

minimising consequences through rapid and effective interventions during and after an emergency; and

(c)

recognise that every person, community, organisation, and agency has a role to play in reduction; and

(d)

facilitate a shared understanding of who benefits from, and pays for, risk exposure for the purpose of improving decision making throughout society in determining acceptable levels of risk; and

(e)

review reduction policies and programmes regularly to reflect changes in community goals and the relevant risks and vulnerability factors; and

(f)

take a precautionary approach to managing hazards and risks where there is—

(i)

scientific or technical uncertainty about a hazard or risk; or

(ii)

potential for cumulative or cascading risks to arise.

89 Legislation involving aspects of reduction
90 Reduction at national level

(1)

Each hazard type presents different circumstances and challenges for the ways in which risk reduction is carried out.

(2)

Reduction is generally undertaken through—

(a)

the mainstream functions and activities of central and local government under their governing legislative and policy mandates; and

(b)

the risk management practices of agencies, private organisations, and individuals.

(3)

At the national level, reduction activities for all hazards include—

(a)

the development, administration, and review of policy and regulation that facilitate reduction across society (for example, land use planning, regulations for the storage, use, transport, and disposal of hazardous substances, and performance standards and codes for the design and construction of buildings and other structures); and

(b)

the delivery of risk management services (for example, biosecurity border controls, public health programmes, and establishing national priorities and funding for hazards research); and

(c)

communication about risks and the roles and expectations of the State sector, private organisations, and individuals in managing those risks; and

(d)

the establishment, monitoring, and evaluation of policies and programmes across the social, economic, built, and natural environments that improve and promote the sustainable management of hazards and support increases in individual and community resilience to the risks that those hazards pose.

91 Reduction under this plan

(1)

A guiding principle of the National CDEM Strategy for risk management is that it is—

(a)

comprehensive (meaning that it takes a measured approach to dealing with all risks through reduction, readiness, response, and recovery activities); and

(b)

integrated (meaning that it promotes co-ordinated involvement of all agencies that have a role in managing those risks).

(2)

Part 5 of this plan outlines the roles and responsibilities of agencies under this plan, which may include reduction.

(3)

This plan may further contribute to reduction through providing for efficient and effective management during the readiness, response, and recovery phases of emergencies, thereby avoiding an escalation of immediate adverse consequences and adverse consequences from future emergencies.

(4)

Each agency with specific roles and responsibilities under this plan should—

(a)

carry out its roles and responsibilities in a comprehensive and integrated manner; and

(b)

undertake to further reduce risk when carrying out readiness, response, and recovery activities.

Part 7 Readiness

92 Introduction

(1)

Readiness involves developing operational systems and capabilities before an emergency happens, including making arrangements with emergency services, lifeline utilities, and other agencies, and developing self-help and response programmes for the general public.

(2)

For agencies, readiness is achieved through planning, developing capability, exercising and testing arrangements, and monitoring and evaluating capability and capacity.

(3)

For individuals, communities, organisations, and businesses, readiness is achieved through the use of public education and community engagement programmes that build resilient communities.

93 Objective

The objective of readiness is to build capacity and capability, and to enable an effective response to, and recovery from, emergencies.

94 Principles

The principles underlying readiness are to—

(a)

understand that New Zealand has finite capacity and capability for deployment in response to, or recovery from, emergencies; and

(b)

establish and maintain ongoing processes to identify significant gaps and shortfalls in capacity and capability; and

(c)

build and maintain capacity and capability for response and recovery.

95 Readiness activities

(1)

Readiness activities include—

(a)

planning; and

(b)

developing capability; and

(c)

exercising and testing arrangements; and

(d)

monitoring and evaluation; and

(e)

public education and community engagement.

(2)

To function to the fullest possible extent (even though this may be at a reduced level) during and after an emergency and to contribute to response and recovery, each agency with responsibilities under this plan is expected to undertake readiness activities to—

(a)

develop capability, and exercise and test their arrangements; and

(b)

establish and maintain necessary equipment and operational systems, and address any need for specific interoperability and co-ordination with interdependent agencies; and

(c)

monitor and evaluate their capacity and capability to perform in different emergency situations.

Planning

96 Introduction

Effective management of emergencies is dependent upon all agencies having undertaken sufficient planning and readiness activities for both business continuity and their operational roles in response and recovery.

97 Business continuity planning

(1)

Under sections 58, 60, and 64 of the Act, each government department, lifeline utility, and local authority is required to—

(a)

undertake planning activities to ensure that it is able to function to the fullest possible extent (even though this may be at a reduced level) during and after an emergency, having particular regard to its roles and responsibilities under this plan; and

(b)

make available to the Director in writing, on request, its plan for functioning during and after an emergency.

(2)

All other agencies with roles and responsibilities under this plan should also undertake business continuity planning to ensure their ability to carry out their roles and responsibilities during response and recovery.

(3)

Avoiding, mitigating, or remedying the risks of business interruption in emergencies (including loss of interdependent services and operations) should be undertaken as part of continuing risk management within normal business processes.

(4)

Each agency should have plans and strategies for continuing its critical business processes and providing capacity for undertaking its response and recovery responsibilities in this plan.

98 Emergency management planning

Each agency with roles and responsibilities under this plan should—

(a)

undertake activities to identify hazards and understand risks; and

(b)

take a risk-based approach to planning; and

(c)

develop and maintain current emergency management plans that describe how the agency is to carry out its roles and responsibilities, including—

(i)

each aspect of its activities across the 4 Rs; and

(ii)

co-ordination with other agencies.

Capability development

99 Introduction

(1)

The capability and capacity of agencies and CDEM Groups to perform optimally in emergency management roles rely on an integrated, broad network of understandings, skills, and relationships.

(2)

In the CDEM context, capability development includes the process of developing people to perform confidently and competently under potentially high levels of stress.

(3)

Capability development encompasses recruitment, selection, teaching, support, and performance management (those functions are supported by a common framework for competencies and a national, multi-agency capability development strategy).

100 CDEM capability development strategy

(1)

The CDEM capability development strategy provides for a co-ordinated and collaborative approach to the development and delivery of training and education to CDEM personnel.

(2)

The key results of the CDEM capability development strategy are—

(a)

emergency management is recognised as a profession in New Zealand with clear professional development pathways for key roles and functions; and

(b)

emergency management leaders are knowledgeable, competent, and well supported; and

(c)

CDEM volunteers are recruited and trained for activities that both fit with their motivations and meet community needs; and

(d)

the sustainability of the strategy is ensured through mandated multi-agency collaboration and ongoing commitment; and

(e)

CDEM Groups and agencies have—

(i)

a culture of evidence-based practice; and

(ii)

systems in place to support the sharing of research and sound emergency management practice.

101 CDEM competency framework

(1)

Effective delivery of CDEM across all agencies depends on building and maintaining effective human resource capabilities.

(2)

The CDEM competency framework provides a foundation for recruitment, selection, performance management, and needs-based capability development for roles in CDEM.

(3)

The CDEM competency framework also provides a foundation for the provision of international professional accreditation.

102 Capability development activities

(1)

Agencies and CDEM Groups should determine their capability development activities through a development needs analysis process that is aligned with the CDEM competency framework.

(2)

Mechanisms for the provision of capability development to persons in CDEM roles include—

(a)

CDEM-focused or CDEM-related training and courses delivered by the MCDEM, CDEM Groups, local authorities, and education providers (for example, polytechnics, universities, or private training establishments); and

(b)

on-the-job learning and assessment (for example, supervision, mentoring, and employer-sponsored visits or study nationally and internationally); and

(c)

opportunities that support CDEM knowledge and performance (for example, standards-based delivery, planning sessions, internal communications, organisational training, exercises, and staff development programmes); and

(d)

CDEM theme-based exchanges (for example, workshops, seminars, and conferences); and

(e)

performance evaluations that are focused on assessing and improving development programmes (for example, debriefings, reviews, assessments, internal or external audits, and monitoring); and

(f)

remote delivery and assessment through distance learning; and

(g)

multi-agency collaboration (for example, joint planning for readiness, response, or recovery capability, cluster meetings, and national, CDEM Group, or local projects).

Exercising and testing

103 Introduction

(1)

Exercising and testing arrangements help to—

(a)

evaluate capability; and

(b)

identify gaps and issues; and

(c)

provide opportunities for practising established roles and responsibilities.

(2)

Lessons identified in exercises should be integrated into work programmes and used to update plans and procedures to further improve the ability of agencies to carry out response and recovery activities.

104 National CDEM Exercise Programme

(1)

The National CDEM Exercise Programme provides the means to co-ordinate exercising of the CDEM operational capability of agencies and CDEM Groups and their local partners (for example, lifeline utilities).

(2)

The National CDEM Exercise Programme—

(a)

seeks to exercise the operational arrangements within this plan, CDEM Group plans, and agency plans to—

(i)

improve response and recovery at local, CDEM Group, and national levels; and

(ii)

assess readiness; and

(b)

is supplemented by regular agency and local exercises; and

(c)

is co-ordinated by the MCDEM; and

(d)

is an element of the all-of-government National Exercise Programme (interagency) managed by the DPMC.

105 Exercising and testing activities

(1)

Each agency with roles and responsibilities under this plan should regularly exercise and test its arrangements.

(2)

Exercising arrangements may be carried out via the following means:

(a)

exercises run by an agency; and

(b)

exercises within the National CDEM Exercise Programme; and

(c)

exercises within the National Exercise Programme.

(3)

Each agency should share with other relevant agencies and CDEM Groups any lessons and improvements resulting from exercises and tests.

Monitoring and evaluation

106 Introduction

(1)

Each agency with responsibilities under this plan should continually monitor and measure progress against its goals and objectives and ensure that it has the capacity and capability necessary to perform its CDEM roles and responsibilities.

(2)

The Act sets out requirements in section 8(2)(c), (d), and (f) for the Director to monitor and evaluate—

(a)

the National CDEM Strategy; and

(b)

this plan; and

(c)

the performance of CDEM Groups and persons with responsibilities under the Act.

(3)

CDEM Groups are also responsible for monitoring and reporting on their compliance with the Act under section 17(1)(h).

107 CDEM Monitoring and Evaluation Programme

The CDEM Monitoring and Evaluation Programme aims to—

(a)

provide performance criteria and a self-assessment process that any agency or CDEM Group can use to evaluate its capacity and capability at any time; and

(b)

monitor the capacity and capability of all agencies with responsibilities under the Act by undertaking a programme of national capability assessments (all agencies will periodically complete a capability assessment to document New Zealand’s collective CDEM capability).

108 Monitoring and evaluation activities

(1)

Each agency with responsibilities under the Act and this plan should—

(a)

monitor and evaluate its capacity and capability to carry out activities across the 4 Rs by—

(i)

measuring performance against standards, benchmarks, or performance indicators; and

(ii)

exercising and testing capacity and capability; and

(iii)

analysing effectiveness; and

(iv)

tracking progress towards goals and objectives; and

(b)

monitor its compliance with the Act.

(2)

The MCDEM is responsible for the monitoring and evaluation of—

(a)

the National CDEM Strategy; and

(b)

this plan; and

(c)

CDEM Groups and other persons with responsibilities under the Act.

(3)

The monitoring and evaluation is to be carried out—

(a)

by reviewing and reporting progress on the National CDEM Strategy; and

(b)

by reviewing, exercising, and testing arrangements of this plan; and

(c)

by evaluating the response to, and recovery from, emergencies; and

(d)

through the CDEM Monitoring and Evaluation Programme.

Public education and community engagement

109 Introduction

(1)

CDEM public education and community engagement aims to—

(a)

build public awareness of New Zealand’s hazards and their possible consequences; and

(b)

enable individuals and communities to take the necessary steps to reduce risks and prepare for emergencies; and

(c)

work with other agencies to support and align with each other’s strategies and programmes.

(2)

Each lead agency is responsible for the development and delivery of public education and community engagement strategies and programmes relating to the hazards and risks it manages.

110 National CDEM public education strategy

The national CDEM public education strategy provides overall direction for developing and delivering public education programmes to—

(a)

increase individual and community awareness of all hazards; and

(b)

improve readiness for an emergency; and

(c)

increase community awareness, understanding, and participation in CDEM; and

(d)

define those programmes that are best co-ordinated and delivered at a national level by the MCDEM; and

(e)

identify supporting strategies for programmes delivered by CDEM Groups and local authorities at the CDEM Group and local level.

111 National CDEM public education programme

(1)

The national CDEM public education programme comprises activities that promote the national CDEM public education strategy, including—

(a)

a long-term public education strategy; and

(b)

a national mass-media campaign and supporting resources; and

(c)

a national schools programme; and

(d)

monitoring and evaluation.

(2)

Each agency developing public messages about hazards and risks is encouraged to ensure consistency with nationally agreed and supported messages for CDEM.

Part 8 Response

112 Introduction

(1)

Response involves actions taken immediately before, during, or directly after an emergency to save lives and property and to help communities begin to recover.

(2)

Response ends when the response objectives have been met or a transition to recovery has occurred.

113 Objectives

Response objectives include—

(a)

the preservation of life; and

(b)

the prevention of escalation of the emergency; and

(c)

the maintenance of law and order; and

(d)

the provision of safety and security measures for people and property; and

(e)

the care of sick, injured, and dependent people; and

(f)

the provision of essential services; and

(g)

the preservation of governance; and

(h)

the protection of assets (including buildings and their contents and cultural and historic heritage assets); and

(i)

the protection of natural and physical resources and the provision of animal welfare (to the extent reasonably possible in the circumstances); and

(j)

the continuation or restoration of economic activity; and

(k)

the putting into place of effective arrangements for the transition to recovery.

114 Principles

(1)

Agencies respond to an emergency by co-ordinating with the lead agency and activating their own plans.

(2)

Within the constraints that the emergency creates, each agency, operating within its particular mandate, is expected to—

(a)

assess the consequences of an emergency on its own staff, assets, and services; and

(b)

activate its own business continuity and emergency operational arrangements; and

(c)

maintain or restore the services it provides; and

(d)

communicate relevant information to the lead agency, other responders, and the public; and

(e)

align response activities with those of other agencies to avoid gaps and duplications.

(3)

In addition, CDEM Groups, emergency services, and lifeline utilities are expected to—

(a)

undertake initial assessments of the form, and extent of the consequences, of the emergency and potential further risks to people, property, and services within the affected area; and

(b)

co-ordinate the local efforts of their agency; and

(c)

communicate assessments and actions to the appropriate lead agency.

(4)

Recovery measures should be planned for and implemented (with necessary modifications) from the first day of the response (or as soon as practicable) and should be co-ordinated and integrated with response actions.

115 Coordinated Incident Management System

(1)

Responses to emergencies are based on the CIMS framework.

(2)

The purpose of the CIMS is to achieve effective co-ordinated incident management across responding agencies by—

(a)

establishing common structures, functions, and terminology to be used by agencies in incident management, yet within a framework that is flexible, modular, and scalable so that it can be tailored to circumstances specific to any level or type of incident; and

(b)

enabling agencies to develop their own processes, procedures, and training for the execution of the CIMS.

(3)

To give effect to the CIMS, those fulfilling key roles at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels during the response are expected to be trained and practised in its use.

(4)

The CDEM response under this plan recognises the CIMS response levels.

116 Transition to recovery

(1)

Planning for the transition from response to recovery needs to occur during response.

(2)

Transitional arrangements are set out in clause 155 of this plan.

National warnings and advisories

117 Introduction

(1)

National warnings and advisories provide information about the potential or actual threat to people, property, areas, or social or economic activities.

(2)

National warnings and advisories do not cover—

(a)

long-term or slowly evolving threats about which information is disseminated through the usual communications of relevant agencies; or

(b)

the actions to be taken by agencies and the procedures for responding to national warnings and advisories.

(3)

The effectiveness of a warning or an advisory depends on—

(a)

the timeliness of the warning or advisory; and

(b)

the delivery and receipt of the warning or advisory; and

(c)

the recipients’ understanding of the necessary action to be taken in respect of the particular threat or threats; and

(d)

the readiness and response at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels.

118 Objective

(1)

The objective in respect of potential or actual threats is to issue national warnings and advisories in a timely manner so that agencies, CDEM Groups, local authorities, and people can take action to reduce loss of life, injury, and damage.

(2)

Warnings and advisories are to be given as quickly as practicable.

(3)

Where a warning is not possible, the objective is to inform the response by indicating the likely magnitude of an emergency and the extent of the affected areas.

119 Principles

(1)

Monitoring, identification, and analysis of geological and meteorological hazards and threats and subsequent issuing of hazard information is to be undertaken at all times by the following agencies:

(a)

the Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited (severe weather); and

(b)

GNS Science (earthquake, volcanic activity, and landslides); and

(c)

the MCDEM (tsunamis).

(2)

Relevant government agencies, CDEM Groups, local authorities, and lifeline utilities are to maintain arrangements to receive and respond to hazard information.

120 National warning system

(1)

The national warning system is a 24/7 process for communicating hazard information to alert recipients to the need for readiness and possible response to a potential or an imminent threat that may result in an emergency.

(2)

The MCDEM is responsible for overseeing the maintenance and function of the national warning system.

(3)

The standard operating procedure under this system specifies the principles underlying and methods of disseminating national warnings.

(4)

National warnings and advisories are provided by the MCDEM to CDEM Groups, local authorities, emergency services, agencies, lifeline utilities, and broadcasters.

(5)

CDEM Groups are responsible for—

(a)

disseminating national warnings to local communities; and

(b)

maintaining local warning systems.

(6)

If arrangements are made with the MCDEM, the national warning system can be used to issue national warnings about hazards for which warning arrangements are decided and maintained by other agencies.

National Crisis Management Centre

121 Introduction

(1)

The NCMC is a facility established by the Government to enable the national co-ordination and management of the response to and recovery from emergencies.

(2)

The MCDEM is responsible for the management, development, and maintenance of the generic NCMC facilities and reports to the ODESC in this regard.

122 Objective

The objective of the NCMC is to facilitate an all-of-government response in support of government crisis management arrangements by providing a secure, centralised facility for information gathering and information management, strategic-level oversight, decision making, and co-ordination of national responses.

123 Principles

The principles underlying the maintenance, development, and use of the NCMC are to—

(a)

keep the NCMC in a constant state of readiness for activation, with the understanding that emergencies requiring an all-of-government response may require activation of the NCMC by the lead agency or the ODESC; and

(b)

ensure that the relevant lead agency, when responding to an imminent threat or emergency, initiates the appropriate government crisis management arrangements at a speed and to a level commensurate with the threat or emergency; and

(c)

ensure that agencies with supporting roles examine the nature of the emergency or threat and activate their emergency arrangements in co-ordination with the lead agency (those agencies may be required to provide representation and support at the NCMC); and

(d)

understand that the NCMC may be activated without a declaration of a state of local or national emergency; and

(e)

ensure that all lead agencies are responsible for the maintenance of their own unique infrastructure, processes, and staffing arrangements (including provision for support agencies); and

(f)

understand that responding to any emergency has precedence over exercising and testing in the NCMC.

124 MCDEM use of NCMC when lead agency

(1)

The MCDEM, when the lead agency, uses the NCMC to support the National Controller and to co-ordinate an all-of-government response.

(2)

The NCMC is used to—

(a)

gather, collate, assess, and produce information; and

(b)

co-ordinate and direct response operations and support; and

(c)

issue public information and conduct media liaison; and

(d)

inform and advise Ministers, Cabinet, and agencies; and

(e)

co-ordinate national resources and international assistance (if required).

(3)

The nature of the emergency determines the model of activation (the NCMC may operate in any of the modes indicated in Appendix 2).

(4)

Activating the NCMC for an emergency when the MCDEM is the lead agency involves links with—

(a)

ECCs; and

(b)

support agencies; and

(c)

national lifeline utilities; and

(d)

news media.

(5)

When the MCDEM is the lead agency, other agencies may perform the role of support agency and provide liaison officers to the NCMC to assist with co-ordination at the national level in accordance with agency roles and responsibilities as set out in this plan.

(6)

When the MCDEM is the lead agency, support agencies for the NCMC may include—

(a)

GNS Science:

(b)

the DPMC:

(c)

the Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited:

(d)

the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment:

(e)

the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade:

(f)

the Ministry of Health:

(g)

the Ministry for Primary Industries:

(h)

the Ministry of Social Development:

(i)

the Ministry of Transport:

(j)

the New Zealand Customs Service:

(k)

the New Zealand Defence Force:

(l)

the New Zealand Fire Service:

(m)

the New Zealand Police:

(n)

Transpower.

125 Use of NCMC by other lead agencies

When a lead agency other than the MCDEM is using the NCMC to co-ordinate the response to an emergency, the MCDEM will—

(a)

co-ordinate the CDEM response from an alternative location; and

(b)

provide a liaison officer to the NCMC; and

(c)

provide NCMC facilities to support the lead agency.

Emergency information management

126 Introduction

(1)

Emergency information management supports decision making before, during, and after an emergency.

(2)

An appropriate and timely response requires efficient and effective information management.

(3)

The MCDEM maintains a national CDEM emergency management information system for that purpose.

127 Objective

The objective of emergency information management is to manage and exchange timely, relevant, consistent, and reliable information to aid and support decision making and enable an effective and integrated response and recovery.

128 Principles

The principles regarding information management during an emergency are to—

(a)

use, where practicable, systems that enable multi-agency use and visibility; and

(b)

use business-as-usual information supplied from and maintained by the responsible agencies; and

(c)

augment the business-as-usual information with information for the emergency, exchanged between the responding agencies; and

(d)

use normal communication methods and additional emergency communication methods in the order of their availability and effectiveness at the time; and

(e)

conform, where practicable, to equivalent business-as-usual practice and national standard specifications; and

(f)

use inter-operable data standards; and

(g)

apply business continuity principles (for example, emergency recovery, off-site backup, and multiple telecommunication paths); and

(h)

ensure that information is appropriately secured in accordance with government protocols and policy; and

(i)

apply standard requirements for official government information (in terms of security, disclosure, and record keeping) in the management and reporting of emergency information; and

(j)

ensure that personnel who are able to access official information of a sensitive or classified nature are appropriately vetted.

129 Reporting information during emergency

The following lines of reporting information during an emergency should be used on a regular basis and as far as practicable:

(a)

Local Controllers inform the Group Controller; and

(b)

Group Controllers inform the National Controller; and

(c)

the National Controller provides consolidated reports, when appropriate, to—

(i)

the Minister; and

(ii)

the ODESC; and

(iii)

CDEM Groups; and

(iv)

support agencies at the national level; and

(d)

Controllers at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels inform relevant support agencies; and

(e)

support agencies at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels inform the relevant Controllers.

Public information management

130 Introduction

(1)

Public information management during an emergency involves—

(a)

identifying the need for information, advice, or assistance required; and

(b)

gathering information and disseminating it to the public; and

(c)

media liaison and monitoring.

(2)

Public information management is necessary before, during, and after an emergency.

(3)

The target audiences for public information are all people who are, or may be, directly or indirectly affected by the emergency, including culturally and linguistically diverse communities and people with disabilities.

131 Objectives

The objectives of public information management during an emergency are to—

(a)

provide timely, accurate, and appropriate information, advice, or instruction to the public; and

(b)

build public confidence in a responsible, competent operation that makes all reasonable efforts to inform and protect the community; and

(c)

promote the effective management and co-ordination of public information between agencies, CDEM Groups, news media, and the public.

132 Principles

The principles underlying emergency public information management at the national level are to—

(a)

establish, before an emergency,—

(i)

a working relationship between news media representatives and Public Information Managers of lead agencies; and

(ii)

an understanding of each other’s expectations during an emergency; and

(b)

provide, during an emergency, dependable, accurate, and timely information to news media to help the gathering and dissemination of news and information; and

(c)

use a wide range of channels and media to reach as many people as possible, including culturally and linguistically diverse communities and people with disabilities; and

(d)

ensure that each agency that manages public information during an emergency acts according to an integrated public information management plan established by the lead agency; and

(e)

provide public information that is consistent across all agencies involved in, or supporting, the response during an emergency and that is consistent within each agency at the national, CDEM Group, and local levels (key messages must be compatible or in agreement with each other); and

(f)

understand that national agencies and CDEM Groups may pool personnel and resources to provide a professional and timely public information service.

133 National roles

(1)

During an emergency where the MCDEM is the lead agency,—

(a)

the Director or the National Controller will, as required, issue public information statements; and

(b)

the MCDEM will—

(i)

activate a public information management function to monitor and co-ordinate public information; and

(ii)

activate, as required, the memorandum of understanding with certain television and radio broadcasters for the broadcast of emergency announcements; and

(c)

the Ministry of Social Development, in consultation with, or at the request of, the National Controller, may activate the government helpline to provide information on the services and assistance available to people affected by the emergency; and

(d)

the DPMC, on the instructions of the ODESC, may convene an all-of-government communications group to develop and co-ordinate consistent national and international key messages.

(2)

The all-of-government communications group may include representatives from the following agencies:

(a)

the MCDEM:

(b)

the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment:

(c)

the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade:

(d)

the Ministry of Health:

(e)

the Ministry for Primary Industries:

(f)

the Ministry of Social Development:

(g)

the Ministry of Transport:

(h)

the New Zealand Customs Service:

(i)

the New Zealand Fire Service:

(j)

the New Zealand Police.

Logistics

134 Introduction

(1)

CDEM logistics support response and recovery by providing resources to—

(a)

maintain response capacity and capability; and

(b)

address the needs of affected communities.

(2)

This requires the procurement, transportation, accommodation, and deployment of personnel, facilities, supplies, equipment, and services.

135 Objective

The objective of CDEM logistics is to provide sufficient resources in a timely manner to support response and recovery operations.

136 Principles

The principles regarding logistics are to—

(a)

use business-as-usual processes and systems; and

(b)

understand that pre-planned systems and processes for the identification, procurement, and deployment of resources and the reconciliation of accounts and accountability reporting are essential to an effective logistics system; and

(c)

adopt a collaborative approach to logistics planning (involving all stakeholders) based on shared-risk and needs analysis before an emergency to enable a co-ordinated response; and

(d)

actively manage only those resources that are in short supply; and

(e)

understand that agencies are responsible for the procurement and management of their own resources in a co-ordinated manner, as envisaged by the CIMS (and may request assistance from the next level of Controller); and

(f)

use local resources, where practicable, before using those from other areas.

137 CDEM logistics activities

(1)

Each agency involved in CDEM logistics is to—

(a)

maintain systems and processes to ensure adequate logistics capability to support their own operations; and

(b)

co-operate with national level agencies for co-ordinated logistics planning.

(2)

During an emergency where the MCDEM is the lead agency,—

(a)

the MCDEM—

(i)

co-ordinates all-of-government logistics activities; and

(ii)

co-ordinates the use of resources that the National Controller considers critical; and

(iii)

facilitates international procurement; and

(iv)

procures resources to support the CDEM response where appropriate; and

(b)

CDEM Groups—

(i)

co-ordinate the use of resources that the CDEM Group Controller or the Local Controller considers critical; and

(ii)

inform the MCDEM of these critical resources as soon as practicable; and

(iii)

procure resources to support the CDEM response where appropriate; and

(iv)

may request the MCDEM to procure resources, when local capacity has been used; and

(c)

support agencies—

(i)

procure resources to support their response where appropriate; and

(ii)

inform the appropriate EOC or ECC or the NCMC of any critical or significant logistics-related activities; and

(iii)

inform the lead agency and other support agencies of logistics capability and available stock holdings; and

(iv)

participate in planning and co-ordination activities.

Mass evacuation

138 Introduction

Mass evacuation of a defined area is necessary when—

(a)

a potential or an imminent threat poses unacceptable risks for the safety of people remaining in the area; or

(b)

the consequences of an emergency have rendered the area uninhabitable.

139 Objective

If mass evacuation is required, the objective is to move people out of the area of risk in a timely, safe, and effective manner.

140 Principles

The principles underlying mass evacuation are to—

(a)

understand that in emergencies people are often better off sheltering in place, but that evacuation will be considered when the risks of staying in place outweigh the risks of relocating people; and

(b)

ensure that, when evacuation is necessary, people are accommodated as near to their homes as possible; and

(c)

ensure that planning for evacuation is collaborative (involving all stakeholders) and includes, where possible, consultation with affected communities; and

(d)

ensure that—

(i)

the primary responsibility for the welfare of animals lies with the owner or person in charge of the animals; and

(ii)

the evacuation of companion animals, including disability assist dogs, occurs alongside people; and

(iii)

the evacuation of production and other non-companion animals is the responsibility of the owner or person in charge of the animals.

141 Management of evacuation

(1)

Evacuations are managed at the local level in the affected area and are supported, and may be co-ordinated, by the ECC.

(2)

Co-ordination and support at the national level for evacuations will be provided when CDEM Group capability is overwhelmed.

(3)

Further information on the management of evacuation is provided in The Guide.

142 Types of evacuation

(1)

Evacuation can, as a voluntary step or mandatory requirement, occur before, during, or after an emergency.

(2)

Evacuation before an emergency may occur as a necessary precaution until—

(a)

the risk is understood or contained; or

(b)

the risk has been sufficiently managed.

(3)

Voluntary evacuation occurs when people choose to move without being directed to do so.

(4)

Mandatory evacuation occurs when people are directed that they must leave an area because the risks of remaining there are considered too great.

(5)

Mandatory evacuation can be ordered,—

(a)

before a state of emergency is declared, by the New Zealand Police (under section 14 of the Search and Surveillance Act 2012) or the fire services, if life or property is in danger; or

(b)

after a state of emergency is declared, by the New Zealand Police, the National Controller, a CDEM Group Controller, or a person authorised as specified under section 86 of the Act.

143 Phases of evacuation

The 5 phases of an evacuation are—

(a)

the decision to evacuate:

(b)

the warning of evacuation:

(c)

the process of evacuation:

(d)

the shelter of evacuees:

(e)

the return of evacuees.

International assistance for New Zealand

144 Introduction

(1)

An emergency in New Zealand may—

(a)

generate offers of assistance from overseas governments and non-governmental organisations; or

(b)

necessitate requests from New Zealand for external assistance.

(2)

The National Controller, or the Director, as a member of the ODESC, may recommend that international assistance be requested to support the response or recovery.

(3)

The Government will approve the use of international assistance through the government crisis management arrangements of the ODESC system.

145 Objective

The objective of international assistance is to enhance New Zealand’s response capacity and capability where required following a large-scale emergency.

146 Principles

The principles underlying international assistance are to—

(a)

ensure that any international assistance is consistent with New Zealand laws and regulations; and

(b)

ensure that international assistance is based on requests made by the New Zealand Government or the acceptance of offers of assistance by the New Zealand Government; and

(c)

maintain, through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, effective lines of communication with foreign governments and international organisations on all aspects of an emergency via New Zealand’s overseas posts and foreign diplomatic missions accredited to New Zealand; and

(d)

understand that the ODESC may authorise the National Controller to provide daily situation reports to the international community; and

(e)

ensure that requests for and offers of international assistance are co-ordinated by the National Controller through the international assistance function managed by the MCDEM; and

(f)

use the following links to the international community:

(i)

existing lines of communication between the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and foreign governments and international organisations; and

(ii)

New Zealand’s overseas diplomatic posts; and

(iii)

foreign diplomatic missions resident in and accredited to New Zealand; and

(iv)

the UNOCHA; and

(v)

the Non-Governmental Organisations Disaster Relief Forum; and

(g)

ensure that all international assistance is, upon arrival in New Zealand, co-ordinated by the National Controller (who may request other agencies or officials to co-ordinate particular aspects of this assistance); and

(h)

ensure that once an international resource has been requested, and the resource has been mobilised (even if a domestic resource becomes available), the international resource arrives in New Zealand; and

(i)

ensure that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (with the assistance of the New Zealand Red Cross, the New Zealand Police, the Ministry of Health, and the New Zealand Customs Service) keeps the international community informed of the safety and whereabouts of foreign nationals.

147 National roles

(1)

During an emergency where the MCDEM is the lead agency, the Director or the National Controller may activate an international assistance function to work with relevant agencies to co-ordinate international assistance.

(2)

The international assistance function—

(a)

facilitates the communication and co-ordination of actions across agencies in respect of international assistance during an emergency in New Zealand; and

(b)

receives and collates offers of international assistance; and

(c)

receives and collates requests for international assistance; and

(d)

when required, matches requests for international assistance with offers of assistance; and

(e)

communicates through the appropriate channels requests for, and acceptance of, international assistance.

(3)

The international assistance function is co-ordinated by the MCDEM and includes representatives from the following agencies:

(a)

the DPMC:

(b)

the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade:

(c)

the Ministry of Health:

(d)

the Ministry for Primary Industries:

(e)

the New Zealand Customs Service:

(f)

the New Zealand Defence Force:

(g)

the New Zealand Fire Service:

(h)

the New Zealand Red Cross:

(i)

the Non-Governmental Organisations Disaster Relief Forum.

148 Approval to accept or request international assistance

International assistance may be initiated by a request—

(a)

for immediate support for lifesaving activities (specifically medical and urban search and rescue resources, which can be approved immediately by the National Controller); or

(b)

from the National Controller, or the Director, via the ODESC to the NSC, seeking approval to activate international assistance arrangements to support the New Zealand response for the duration of the emergency (if the NSC is unable to meet, approval will be sought from a senior Minister, or the chair of the ODESC).

149 Requests for international assistance

(1)

All requests for international assistance are to be provided to the National Controller for consideration.

(2)

The process for making requests for international assistance is detailed in The Guide.

150 Offers of international assistance

(1)

All offers of international assistance are to be provided to the National Controller for consideration and agreement before acceptance of that assistance.

(2)

The process for accepting offers of international assistance is detailed in The Guide.

(3)

Any international assistance must be able to operate within the New Zealand regulatory and legal framework.

151 United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA)

(1)

New Zealand joined the consensus on United Nations General Assembly Resolutions 46/182 and 57/150, which were adopted without vote.

(2)

General Assembly Resolution 46/182 strengthened the United Nations’ capacity to respond to both complex emergencies and natural disasters worldwide.

(3)

General Assembly Resolution 46/182 also created the position of Emergency Relief Coordinator (USG/ERC), who is the head of UNOCHA and is responsible for co-ordinating the international response to disasters, natural and human-made, as well as acting as principal adviser to the Secretary-General of the United Nations on humanitarian issues and concerns.

(4)

UNOCHA’s mandate, under the direction of the USG/ERC, includes the co-ordination of humanitarian aid response, policy development, resource mobilisation, and humanitarian advocacy.

(5)

UNOCHA is able to deploy resources to New Zealand at short notice during an emergency if requested by the New Zealand Government.

Part 9 Recovery

152 Introduction

Recovery involves the co-ordinated efforts and processes used to bring about the short-, medium-, and long-term holistic regeneration and enhancement of a community after an emergency.

153 Objectives

Recovery objectives include—

(a)

minimising the escalation of the consequences of the emergency; and

(b)

regeneration and enhancement of—

(i)

the social, psychological, economic, cultural, and physical well-being of individuals and communities; and

(ii)

the economic, built, and natural environments that support that well-being; and

(c)

taking practicable opportunities to adapt to meet the future needs of the community; and

(d)

reducing future exposure to hazards and their associated risks; and

(e)

supporting the resumption of essential community functions.

154 Principles

(1)

Recovery consists of co-ordinated efforts and processes to effect the short-, medium-, and long-term holistic regeneration and enhancement of a community after an emergency and requires that agencies work together in establishing shared goals, priorities, strategies, and information needs.

(2)

Recovery involves the community and activities across the following 4 environments:

(a)

social:

(b)

economic:

(c)

natural:

(d)

built.

(3)

Recovery should be flexible and scalable in accordance with meeting the needs of the community.

(4)

Recovery measures should be pre-planned and implemented (with necessary modifications) from the first day of the response (or as soon as practicable) and should be co-ordinated and integrated with response actions.

(5)

The aim of immediate recovery activity is to enable individuals to continue functioning as part of the wider community.

(6)

A return to past normality may be impossible (for example, continued exposure to unacceptable levels of risk from hazards may necessitate the relocation of people and property at risk).

(7)

Depending on the nature, scale, and complexity of the emergency, recovery may take a short time or many years, possibly decades.

155 Transition from response to recovery

(1)

Information received in response to an emergency should be used as a basis for developing a recovery action plan, and recovery strategy (if required), for establishing and planning effective recovery arrangements.

(2)

As the response concludes, a planned transition to recovery must be managed.

(3)

The transition from response to recovery in emergencies may be staged and variable across regions and areas.

(4)

Effective transition from response to recovery depends on understanding and agreement between Controllers and Recovery Managers.

(5)

The principal aspects of this transition are to be outlined in the recovery action plan and, if needed, the recovery strategy.

156 National recovery activities

(1)

In smaller-scale recoveries, where the scale of co-ordination is beyond the resources of the CDEM Group or the consequences of the emergency are nationally significant, the Director co-ordinates national recovery activities through a National Recovery Manager and, where necessary, the establishment of a National Recovery Office.

(2)

In large-scale recovery, the Government may establish an agency to manage and co-ordinate the Government’s interest in the recovery.

(3)

The agency will act in partnership with the affected local authorities and CDEM Groups and may be given specific roles, responsibilities, and powers.

(4)

The National Recovery Manager—

(a)

co-ordinates the establishment of, and planning for, recovery activity in the short, medium, and long term; and

(b)

implements appropriate reporting and tracking mechanisms; and

(c)

activates and co-ordinates the agencies involved in recovery; and

(d)

chairs and co-ordinates meetings of representatives from recovery task groups; and

(e)

assists with the provision of advice to the Minister and to Cabinet on recovery activity, as required; and

(f)

works with the National Controller and the Public Information Manager to ensure a smooth transition between response and recovery; and

(g)

co-ordinates the recovery activity of the relevant CDEM Groups, lifeline utilities, agencies, and international assistance following the transition from response to recovery and during the short, medium, and long term; and

(h)

if necessary, establishes a National Recovery Office to ensure that recovery activity is co-ordinated and the recovery function is implemented; and

(i)

liaises with CDEM Group Recovery Managers; and

(j)

determines and prioritises major areas of recovery; and

(k)

develops recovery policies; and

(l)

develops a national recovery action plan, and a national recovery strategy (if needed), to establish time frames for the implementation of recovery activities; and

(m)

co-ordinates advice on government assistance; and

(n)

provides national-level co-ordination of public information related to recovery.

(5)

If necessary, the Minister is able to appoint a Recovery Co-ordinator under section 29 of the Act.

157 CDEM Group recovery activities

(1)

Smaller-scale recoveries that require co-ordination at the CDEM Group level will be co-ordinated through the person responsible for recovery management for the CDEM Group (the CDEM Group Recovery Manager) and, where necessary, the establishment of a CDEM Group Recovery Office.

(2)

The CDEM Group Recovery Manager—

(a)

liaises with the National Recovery Manager and, at the local level, a local recovery manager or managers where these are appointed by the relevant territorial authority or authorities; and

(b)

undertakes planning and manages, directs, and co-ordinates activities for the recovery throughout its duration and, if necessary, establishes a CDEM Group Recovery Office to manage the recovery function; and

(c)

implements appropriate reporting and tracking mechanisms; and

(d)

works with the Group Controller and the relevant Public Information Manager to ensure a smooth transition between response and recovery; and

(e)

co-ordinates the recovery activity of the relevant territorial authorities, lifeline utilities and agencies; and

(f)

determines and prioritises major areas of recovery; and

(g)

develops the group recovery action plan, to establish time-frames for the implementation of recovery activities; and

(h)

co-ordinates advice on regional assistance; and

(i)

provides regional-level co-ordination of public information related to recovery.

158 Exit strategy

An exit strategy must be established that includes—

(a)

assistance required in the long term; and

(b)

a transition to business as usual so as to manage long-term recovery; and

(c)

planning and reporting in the long term; and

(d)

the management of public information and communications; and

(e)

opportunities for communities to discuss unresolved issues and to continue to participate in their recovery; and

(f)

changes to organisational arrangements, including the need for recovery task groups; and

(g)

debriefing and reviewing.

Part 10 Government financial support to local authorities

159 Introduction

(1)

Arrangements for government financial support provided to local authorities for emergencies are determined by Cabinet.

(2)

The current arrangements are set out in The Guide.

(3)

Wherever possible, government assistance will be provided in accordance with existing policies.

(4)

The provisions for government financial support to local authorities apply whether or not a state of emergency is, or has been, in force.

160 Objectives

The objectives of any government financial support to local authorities are to—

(a)

provide support by meeting some of the costs incurred in managing the response to and recovery from an emergency; and

(b)

provide the minimum level of assistance required to restore to an affected community the capacity for self-help; and

(c)

return an affected community to a state in which normal social and economic activity can be resumed as quickly as possible.

161 Principles

(1)

The Government considers local risks to be a local responsibility.

(2)

Government financial support is based on the expectation that local authorities will be primarily responsible for bearing the financial costs of the impact of an emergency in their geographical and functional areas of responsibility.

(3)

Government assistance is to provide solutions that are the most appropriate in the long term.

(4)

Government financial support to local authorities does not imply an obligation to restore a community—

(a)

to a better state than existed before the emergency; or

(b)

to previous levels if those levels are not sustainable in the long term.

(5)

Government policies should encourage agencies, local authorities, communities, businesses, and individuals to create resilience through proper management practices, for example, by—

(a)

analysing local hazards and understanding risk exposure:

(b)

preventing emergencies or reducing their likelihood or impact:

(c)

adjusting infrastructure and practices to reduce vulnerability, to mitigate the consequences of emergencies, and to limit potential damage:

(d)

providing for an efficient and effective response to emergencies:

(e)

providing resources for recovery (that is, physical and financial provisions, including adequate emergency reserve funds and insurance).

(6)

Risk management and its associated costs should be borne by the individuals, businesses, and local authorities that benefit from it and are best able to manage or mitigate the risk.

(7)

Individuals, businesses, and local authorities have a responsibility to the extent possible to insure against, and to attempt to minimise or mitigate, risk.

162 Government financial support to local authorities during response

Government financial support for response activities focuses on costs incurred by local authorities to—

(a)

care for directly affected people, including the costs of accommodating, transporting, feeding, and clothing people as a result of an emergency; and

(b)

take the necessary precautions or preventive actions (whether by construction, demolition, or any other means) to reduce the immediate danger to human life, where those precautions or actions were begun during the response period; and

(c)

take precautions or preventive actions aimed at reducing the potential consequences of an emergency, where those precautions or actions were begun in the period immediately before the emergency.

163 Government financial support to local authorities during recovery

(1)

Government recovery assistance will normally be provided to local authorities only if—

(a)

recovery procedures cannot be carried out without government assistance; or

(b)

a statutory requirement for action exists or a need to invoke a statute to achieve the ends desired from the recovery process exists; or

(c)

government assistance will aid the co-ordination of the recovery process to a significant extent; or

(d)

the advantages of economies of scale are apparent.

(2)

Specific principles for recovery assistance are that—

(a)

the Government has a role in the recovery process after an emergency with significant consequences; and

(b)

initial and primary responsibility for the co-ordination of recovery efforts rests with local authorities; and

(c)

any government recovery programme should be designed to restore community capacity for self-help and be consistent with any government policies regarding mitigation and alleviation measures.

164 Special policy for recovery

Special policy financial support may be available to local authorities in cases where, to decrease the likelihood of the occurrence of a similar emergency, funding in addition to existing resources is required for—

(a)

new programmes of work to meet specific needs in an affected region; or

(b)

the upgrading of facilities to a level that is higher than existed previously.

Appendix 1 Lead agencies

cls 12(b), 14(3), 21(1)

The following agencies are mandated through legislation or expertise to manage an emergency arising from the following listed hazards. Note: The role of the lead agency at the national level does not limit, is not in substitution for, and does not affect the functions, duties, or powers that other agencies and CDEM Groups may have in support of national-, CDEM Group-, and local-level management of an emergency.

HazardLead agency at national levelLead agency at local/regional levelAuthority to manage response
Geological (earthquakes, volcanic hazards, landslides, tsunamis)
MCDEMCDEM GroupCivil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002
Meteorological (coastal hazards, coastal erosion, storm surges, large swells, floods, severe winds, snow)
MCDEMCDEM GroupCivil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002
Infrastructure failureMCDEMCDEM GroupCivil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002
Drought (affecting rural sector)Ministry for Primary IndustriesMinistry for Primary IndustriesGovernment policy
Animal and plant pests and diseases (biosecurity)Ministry for Primary IndustriesMinistry for Primary IndustriesBiosecurity Act 1993
Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996
Food safetyMinistry for Primary IndustriesMinistry for Primary IndustriesFood Act 1981
Food Act 2014
Infectious human disease (pandemic)Ministry of HealthDistrict health boardEpidemic Preparedness Act 2006
Health Act 1956
Wild fireNational Rural Fire AuthorityRural Fire Authority
Department of Conservation (conservation estate)
New Zealand Defence Force
Forest and Rural Fires Act 1977
Conservation Act 1987
Defence Act 1990
Urban fireNew Zealand Fire ServiceNew Zealand Fire ServiceFire Service Act 1975
Hazardous substance incidentsNew Zealand Fire ServiceNew Zealand Fire ServiceFire Service Act 1975
Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996
TerrorismNew Zealand PoliceNew Zealand PoliceCrimes Act 1961
International Terrorism (Emergency Powers) Act 1987
Terrorism Suppression Act 2002
Major transport accidentNew Zealand PoliceNew Zealand PoliceVarious
Marine oil spillMaritime New ZealandRegional councilMaritime Transport Act 1994
Radiation incidentMinistry of HealthNew Zealand Fire ServiceRadiation Protection Act 1965
Fire Service Act 1975

Appendix 2 NCMC modes

cl 124(3)

The NCMC operates under the following modes in response

ModeRolesScale
1MonitorMonitor and assess threats and incidents that may lead to a local emergency.Lead agency: on standby
Minimal staffing to monitor impending or actual emergency
Support agencies: on standby
2EngageIn addition to monitoring activities: collect, analyse, and disseminate information on emergencies; report to or advise Government; provide public information service.Lead agency: increased staffing
Support agencies: kept informed, some activated
3AssistIn addition to engagement activities: process or co-ordinate requests for support from regional and local organisations, including assistance from overseas, and international liaison; report to or advise Government.Lead agency: partial to full staffing
Support agencies: most activated
NCMC: fully operational
4DirectIn addition to assisting activities: control and direct the overall response.Lead agency: full staffing
Support agencies: all activated
NCMC: fully operational

Michael Webster, 
Clerk of the Executive Council.

Explanatory note

This note is not part of the order, but is intended to indicate its general effect.

This order, which comes into force on 1 December 2015, makes the national civil defence emergency management plan set out in the Schedule. This plan replaces the plan set out in the Schedule of the National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan Order 2005 (which this order revokes).

Issued under the authority of the Legislation Act 2012.

Date of notification in Gazette: 4 June 2015.

This order is administered by the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management.