Supplementary Order Paper No 440

No 440

House of Representatives

Supplementary Order Paper

Tuesday, 6 May 2014

Food Bill


Proposed amendments

Hon Damien O’Connor, in Committee, to move the following amendments:

Clause 4

In clause 4(e) replace food. (page 22, line 5) with food; and.

After clause 4(e) (page 22, after line 5), insert:

  • (f) require the introduction of country of origin requirements in accordance with the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code 2002.

Clause 7

In clause 7, after the definition of corrective action (page 26, after line 27), insert:

country of origin requirements has the same meaning given to it in Food Standard 1.2.11 of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code 2002

New clause 346A

After clause 346 (page 251, after line 3), insert:

346A Regulations about country of origin requirements
  • The Governor-General must, by Order in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister, make regulations providing for country of origin requirements in accordance with Food Standard 1.2.11 of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code 2002.


Explanatory note

This Supplementary Order Paper amends the Food Bill to require the responsible Minister to adopt Food Standard 1.2.11 of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code 2002, which would introduce mandatory country of origin labelling for some foods manufactured or prepared for sale or sold in New Zealand or imported into New Zealand.

Country of origin labelling is required in Europe, the United States of America, Canada, and Australia. The Australian country of origin labelling standard, which commenced in 2006, requires packaged food and unpackaged fresh and processed fruit, vegetables, nuts, spices, herbs, legumes, seeds, seafood, and pork, to be distinctly labelled with the country of origin. From July this year, this was extended to unpackaged beef, sheep and chicken meat. Although New Zealand is a party to the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code, we have exempted ourselves from this requirement.

This Government’s position for not adopting mandatory country of origin labelling is that it has no benefit in terms of informing consumers of food safety or public health risks. This position is out of step with other developed economies. It also misses the point that Kiwis deserve to know where their food is grown, and the system under which any handling and processing occurred.