59 Privilege in criminal proceedings for information obtained by medical practitioners and clinical psychologists

(1)

This section—

(a)

applies to a person who consults or is examined by a medical practitioner or a clinical psychologist for drug dependency or any other condition or behaviour that may manifest itself in criminal conduct; but

(b)

does not apply in the case of a person who has been required by an order of a Judge, or by other lawful authority, to submit himself or herself to the medical practitioner or clinical psychologist for any examination, test, or for any other purpose.

(1A)

For the purpose of applying subsection (1)(b), there is no privilege under this section in relation to any communication or information (other than any previous medical record or other previous medical information about the person) that is made or obtained for the purpose of the examination or test or for the other purpose concerned.

(2)

A person has a privilege in a criminal proceeding in respect of any communication made by the person to a medical practitioner or clinical psychologist that the person believes is necessary to enable the medical practitioner or clinical psychologist to examine, treat, or care for the person for drug dependency or any other condition or behaviour that may manifest itself in criminal conduct.

(3)

A person has a privilege in a criminal proceeding in respect of information obtained by a medical practitioner or clinical psychologist as a result of consulting with or examining the person to enable the medical practitioner or clinical psychologist to examine, treat, or care for the person for drug dependency or any other condition or behaviour that may manifest itself in criminal conduct.

(4)

A person has a privilege in a criminal proceeding in respect of information consisting of a prescription, or notes of a prescription, for treatment prescribed by a medical practitioner or clinical psychologist as a result of consulting with or examining the person to enable the medical practitioner or clinical psychologist to treat or care for the person for drug dependency or any other condition or behaviour that may manifest itself in criminal conduct.

(5)

A reference in this section to a communication to, or information obtained by, a medical practitioner or a clinical psychologist is to be taken to include a reference to a communication to, or information obtained by, a person acting in a professional capacity on behalf of a medical practitioner or clinical psychologist in the course of the examination or treatment of, or care for, the person by that medical practitioner or clinical psychologist.

(6)

In this section,—

clinical psychologist means a health practitioner—

(a)

who is, or is deemed to be, registered with the Psychologists Board continued by section 114(1)(a) of the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003 as a practitioner of the profession of psychology; and

(b)

who is by his or her scope of practice permitted to diagnose and treat persons suffering from mental and emotional problems

drug dependency means the state of periodic or chronic intoxication produced by the repeated consumption, smoking, or other use of a controlled drug (as defined in section 2(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975) detrimental to the user, and involving a compulsive desire to continue consuming, smoking, or otherwise using the drug or a tendency to increase the dose of the drug.

Section 59(1A): inserted, on 8 January 2017, by section 22 of the Evidence Amendment Act 2016 (2016 No 44).