Family Violence Bill

  • enacted
  • Previous title has changed
4 Principles

The following principles are to guide the achievement of the purpose of this Act:

(a)

family violence, in all its forms, is unacceptable:

(b)

decision makers should, whenever appropriate, recognise that family violence is often behaviour that appears to be minor or trivial when viewed in isolation, but forms part of a pattern of behaviour that causes cumulative harm:

(c)

decision makers should, whenever appropriate, recognise that family violence often is or includes coercive or controlling behaviour:

(d)

decision makers should, whenever appropriate, recognise that children are particularly vulnerable to family violence, including seeing or hearing violence against others:

(e)

decision makers should, whenever appropriate, recognise that children are at particular risk of lasting harm to their current and future well-being:

(f)

decision makers should, whenever appropriate, recognise that other factors (for example, all or any of disability, health condition, and old age) may mean that people are particularly vulnerable to family violence:

(g)

decision makers should, whenever appropriate, recognise that early intervention helps to stop and prevent family violence:

(h)

perpetrators of family violence should face effective responses to, and sanctions for, family violence:

(i)

perpetrators of family violence should have access to, and in some cases be required to engage with, services to help them stop and prevent their family violence:

(j)

victims of family violence should have access to services to help secure their safety from family violence:

(k)

arrangements that support the ongoing safety and well-being of a victim of family violence should whenever practicable be sustained (for example, employment, education, housing, or community involvement):

(l)

responses to family violence should be culturally appropriate and, in particular, responses involving Māori should reflect tikanga Māori (Māori customary values and practices):

(m)

decision makers should consider the views of victims of family violence, and respect those views unless a good reason exists in the particular circumstances for not doing so (for example, because doing so would or may compromise victims’ safety):

(n)

decision makers should collaborate, whenever appropriate, to identify, stop, prevent, and otherwise respond to family violence:

(o)

access to the court should be as speedy, inexpensive, and simple as is consistent with justice.