Ngati Ruanui Claims Settlement Act 2003

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Schedule 7
Statutory acknowledgement for Tangahoe River

s 88

Statutory area

The area to which this statutory acknowledgement applies is the area known as the Tangahoe River, as shown on SO 14740.

Preamble

Under section 88, the Crown acknowledges the statement by Ngati Ruanui of the cultural, spiritual, historical, and traditional association of Ngati Ruanui with the Tangahoe River as set out below.

Cultural, spiritual, historical, and traditional association of Ngati Ruanui with the Tangahoe River

Ngati Ruanui history informs us that the people of the Kahui Maunga (mountain people of the highest rank) inhabited the South Taranaki area prior to the arrival of the Aotea Waka. They in turn were vanquished and enveloped through warfare and intermarriage into the Aotea, Ruanui-a Pokiwa history. One of the areas in which these people were renowned to have flourished is known as the Tangahoe River and valley.

The late Ueroa (Charlie) Ngarewa, an elder of both Tangahoe and Ngati Hine descent, gave one version of the origin of the name Tangahoe. He said the name Tangahoe was given to the river because of an incident that occurred, in which the steering oar was lost from a large deep-sea fishing waka as it attempted to return to the Tauranga waka. The comment was made that if there were 2 steering oars like that of the Waka Tipua of Turi Ariki, then the flight to its resting place would remain true. Turi was the Ariki (Rangatira of highest rank) of the Aotea Waka.

Tangahoe:the steering oars of Turi Ariki

The Tangahoe River has been a major supply of food and water resources to its people both prior to, and since, the arrival of the Aotea Waka. The valley, like the rest of the southern lands, was a fertile paradise. Because of the mild temperatures, it was without extremes and promoted lush vegetation that was checked only by the occasional equinoctial weather patterns. Birds such as manunui (which made its nests amongst the koromiko bushes), kereru (the food of nga Ariki), pukeko (the treasured species brought on the Aotea Waka), tiwaiwaka (the guardian left by Kupe), kahu (the sentinel), kakapo, kiwi, korimako, miromiro (the custodians of the forest), and pipiwharauroa (the heralder of the new year) flourished in the berry-filled trees, like the koromiko, kohia, hinau, piripiri, mamaku, and rewarewa at the side of the eel- and koura-filled creeks. Fish, such as the piharau, kokopu, tunaheke, patiki, and shellfish, were abundant in the waters and on the reefs at the mouth of the river.

During the time of internal warfare, the valley through which the river runs was a trap for the unwary. The many re-entrants and secondary valleys provided natural hiding and attacking areas and, if necessary, places of refuge.

To the people of Ngati Ruanui, all the rivers and their respective valleys are of the utmost importance because of their physical, spiritual, and social significance in the past, present, and future.

Purposes of statutory acknowledgement

Under section 89, and without limiting the rest of this schedule, the only purposes of this statutory acknowledgement are—

  • (a) to require consent authorities, the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, or the Environment Court to have regard to this statutory acknowledgement in relation to the Tangahoe River, as provided for in sections 90 to 92; and

  • (b) to require consent authorities to forward summaries of resource consent applications to the governance entity, as provided for in section 94; and

  • (c) to enable the governance entity and any member of Ngati Ruanui to cite this statutory acknowledgement as evidence of the association of Ngati Ruanui with the Tangahoe River as provided for in section 95; and

  • (d) to provide a statement by Ngati Ruanui of the association of Ngati Ruanui with the Tangahoe River for inclusion in a deed of recognition.

Limitations on effect of statutory acknowledgement

  • (1) Except as expressly provided in sections 89 to 92 and 95,—

    • (a) this statutory acknowledgement does not affect, and is not to be taken into account by, any person exercising a power or performing a function or duty under any statute, regulation, or bylaw; and

    • (b) no person, in considering a matter or making a decision or recommendation under any statute, regulation, or bylaw, may give greater or lesser weight to the association of Ngati Ruanui with the Tangahoe River described in this statutory acknowledgement than that person would give under the relevant statute, regulation, or bylaw if this statutory acknowledgement did not exist in respect of the Tangahoe River.

  • (2) Except as expressly provided in subpart 5 of Part 5, this statutory acknowledgement does not affect the lawful rights or interests of a person who is not a party to the deed of settlement.

  • (3) Except as expressly provided in subpart 5 of Part 5, this statutory acknowledgement does not have the effect of granting, creating, or providing evidence of an estate or interest in, or any rights relating to, the Tangahoe River.

  • (4) Clause (1)(b) does not limit clause (1)(a).

No limitation on the Crown

This statutory acknowledgement does not preclude the Crown from providing a statutory acknowledgement to a person other than Ngati Ruanui in respect of the Tangahoe River.